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Bagpuss

What book are you reading at the moment?

798 posts in this topic

I read that too Baggy. So raw .... I kind of wish I hadn't.

Ive nearly finished Engleby. Its narrated by a guy who is at Cambridge in the 70s so the period detail is fab, and you gradually realise that this nice reasonable bloke is actually an obsessive stalker, who may or may not have been responsible for the disappearance of a female student. I dont know yet!

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I'm halfway through 'Human Croquet' by Kate Atkinson. I'm slowly working my way through all hers. I've got one more to go after this and she has a new one out in the summer. :thumbs: Awesome author.

 

~ Mel ~

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im reading a book called cutting it about a womanwho works for a cable shopping company,im into intellectual reading as you can tell :D

i tried to read keith richards autobiog but i just couldnt get into it

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Sensory Perceptual Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome by Olga Bogdashina is what I'm reading at the moment. Almost finished it :thumbs:

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i tried to read keith richards autobiog but i just couldnt get into it

 

I'm surprised Keith Richards can remember anything about his life :lol:

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Just finished We need to talk about Kevin by Lionel Shriver. Wonderfully written, and had me gripped right to the last word, but shocking and harrowing too. I can recommend it but only if you're feeling strong. I feel the need for something a lot lighter after that, just as an antidote! :unsure:

 

K x

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I'm just starting the latest Joanna Trollope, Friday Nights, but its a race against time as theres a waiting list at the library so no renewals :(

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Every book I've read recently is filled with violence of some sort or another. I've read 'Q and A' and that was quite gruesome at times, 'The Kite Runner' which I know everyone in the world has read and got through, but I don't think I will, 'The English Passengers' which is full of people being killed, 'The Secret River', and so the list goes on.

 

I might try the new Joanna Trollope book next, hopefully there won't be any decapitations or mutilations in it!

 

I did read recently a Bill Bryson book called, 'The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid'. That was enjoyable.

 

Eva

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Sensory Perceptual Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome by Olga Bogdashina is what I'm reading at the moment. Almost finished it :thumbs:

I want to get that. Would you recommend it?

 

I enjoy the Torey Hayden books too, I have read a couple of them. The work she does is remarkable.

 

I have finally finished Nelson Mandela's autobiography. It was really long. Very interesting, but it ends on a very optimistic note, and 10 years on, there is still a lot of progress to be made in South Africa . . . but nevertheless, an interesting book!

 

Now I am reading The Chocolate Run by Dorothy Koomson. Not as good as Marshmallows for Breakfast or her first book, but enjoyable.

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Hi Tally

Yes I would recommend Duma Key - it is very long though! I am about a quarter of the way through and it is excellent - one of those books that I find hard to put down! Just got to a creepy part... won't say anymore though as I don't want to give anything away.

 

I have a couple of Torey's books but Someone Else's Kids is the first one that I have read and I found it hard to put down and agree that what she did was remarkable, especially since it was back at the start of mainstreaming SEN children.

 

What is the Chocolate Run about ?

 

Emma

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I hardly ever get the chance to read anything that isn't autism-related these days, and not even much of that just now.

 

I did an ME/CFS awareness course last year and someone recommended a self-therapy book to me in December. I ordered it straight away, full of enthusiasm, and got as far as page 8 before events overtook me and I haven't opened it since. Ironically I was too knackered to read any more :tearful:

 

However... DH got me Bill Bryson's book about Shakespeare for Christmas and I've started reading that. Not particularly interested in The Bard but Bill can get me into any subject.

 

J's at a karate grading this afternoon so I have TWO WHOLE HOURS OFF so I think I'll have a couple of chapters and a cup of tea right now.

 

Karen

x

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I've just read two books in five days.

Was just passing Oxfam's window last Saturday and saw Harlen Coben's brand new one in the window for �2. Have been waiting for the library to get it. 'The Woods' it's called and was very good, read all of his. Took it back to Oxfam this morning for them to sell again. :thumbs:

Also read a book by Ali Smith, 'Hotel World', very good. Thought I'd be disappointed after enjoying 'The Woods' so much, but it wasn't a let down at all, very moving and interesting.

Just got another one of hers from the library, 'The Accidental', hope it's as good.

 

~ Mel ~

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Dream Catcher is (In SK terms) a bit of a 'toikey'...

Best two SK novels (IMO)

The Stand (M-O-O-N. That spells Tom Cullen)

Firestarter...

 

With SK you're better off reading the older stuff and then reading up to the newer ones

 

BD :)

 

Baddad have you read the uncut version of The Stand? I managed to get it in a charity shop for 20p I find SK's style of writing really hard going but persevered with this one as its my favourite movie.I prefer James Herbert.

I've just got Blood Money by Chris Collett but finished it in an evening :unsure: so hunting for something else now..

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I have a couple of Torey's books but Someone Else's Kids is the first one that I have read and I found it hard to put down and agree that what she did was remarkable, especially since it was back at the start of mainstreaming SEN children.

 

I'm a big fan of Torey Hayden!

 

"Somebody Else's Kids" was the first one I picked up, from a library in South Africa, years ago and I was hooked from then on. I searched for her books for ages but could never find them in bookshops, and I was delighted that they had come back into print and are now freely available. I now have all of them, I think!

 

I like her writing style, and her honesty, and I think she must have been the kind of teacher most of us would like for our children. Although her experiences were of the American education system, a lot of the scenarios she describes would be familiar to many here. Some of the children she worked with were on the autistic spectrum - her books are interesting reads and very gripping stories: even though they are based on her real experiences, she knows how to construct a plot.

 

K x

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I've just started Shoot the Damn Dog, a memoir of depression, cos I want to learn more about it. Thats my daytime book cos I cant read upsetting stuff before going to sleep, so I'm definitely starting the new Joanna Trollope as well in, ooh about 5 mins time. Wish me luck as they are both on reserve at the library so I've limited time to race through them.

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Going through a nostalgic Oxford phase at the moment, just finished Jan Morris' book Oxford and I'm about to start Isolarion by James Attlee about Cowley Rd in Oxford where I lived for a while in the 80s.

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I can't wait until summer as I have an ever growing to read pile. There are 39 books on there so getting just a little bit big I think.

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I only read light stuff cann't switch off if i read anything to heavy, at the moment i'm reading, Mr darcy takes a wife, a sequel that Linda Berdoll has written to pride and prejudice, it's not bad but no one can beat Jane Austin.

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Recently finished 'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss which I highly recommend as a really good fantasy read. Now have switched onto some books from Tad Williams. The first one I read (as it was the first to arrive) was Shadowmarch the start of his latest series. It was a book that really gripped me (as did The Name of the Wind) and I found really hard to put down. It has a fair number of parallel stories but isn't as confussing as some other books I've read. I found it fairly straight foward to follow and had characters who you can feel attached to. Now I'm onto one of his older books 'The Dragonbone Chair' not very far in yet but if anything it has already got me even more absorbed than Shadowmarch did. Can't remember if I've read anything else recently I've not mentioned if I think of anything I've missed out I'll let you know.

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I finished The Chocolate Run and swapped it for Lord of the Rings (part 1).

 

Now I am reading a book by Harlan Coban, the first one of his I have read, but I am liking it a lot!

 

Next up is The Asperger Answer Book

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Picture the scene last night ....

 

Me & mr p sat up in bed reading our respective books.

 

Me: the latest Joanna Trollope

Him: The Dangerous Book for Boys (which he keeps giving me "interesting facts" from)

 

Sums up our relationship, really :lol:

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Picture the scene last night ....

 

Me & mr p sat up in bed reading our respective books.

 

Me: the latest Joanna Trollope

Him: The Dangerous Book for Boys (which he keeps giving me "interesting facts" from)

 

Sums up our relationship, really :lol:

 

 

Sounds like a match made in heaven :wub:

 

I'm reading Ann Tyler's 'The Accidental Tourist'. I'm loving it, very funny in a kind of dry and ironic way. I like books where not a lot happens....just exploring human nature and relationships I guess.

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I have just finished The Woods by Harlan Coben. I would not normally read crime novels, but it was on special offer. I really liked it, and now I want to read more of his books.

 

Now I am reading Blue Sky July by Nia Wyn. She has a child with severe cerebal palsy, and it is about her life with her child. So far, he is two years old and just learning to hold up his head. She is trying lots of therapies to help him, and her husband is feeling very left out.

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Sounds like a match made in heaven :wub:

 

I'm reading Ann Tyler's 'The Accidental Tourist'. I'm loving it, very funny in a kind of dry and ironic way. I like books where not a lot happens....just exploring human nature and relationships I guess.

 

I enjoyed that one, SV, read it a few weeks back. Loved all the weird characters.

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im now reading "the other bolyne girl"

 

:thumbs: love Philippa Gregory & love Tudor history so I was in heaven reading that. Mr p is taking me to see the film in a coupla weeks :thumbs: If you enjoy that, try The Boleyn Inheritance, also by her, its about Catherine Howard.

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Can anyone advise me on where to start with Terry Pratchett? There are so many titles & I've no idea which order they all come in :unsure:

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Just finished the latest Joanna Trollope, Friday Nights. Always enjoy her books.

 

Also just finished Shoot the Damn Dog, a memoir of depression, by Sally Brampton. A difficult & painful read but I would highly recommend it. Theres an AS connection in the middle of the book too, which I wasnt expecting.

 

Would still like advice on Terry Pratchett please :pray:

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