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gigglinggoblin

Can my dentist do this?

10 posts in this topic

About 6 weeks ago I gave up trying to get ds (10) to brush his teeth. If I do them it is a complete nightmare with screaming and shouting and flapping and bouncing and it upsets the whole house. If I send him to do them on his own he spends 20 minutes in the bathroom and then comes down and says he forgot.

 

So we had an appointment booked for 4 weeks ago, I thought 2 weeks would be ok, I could ask the dentist to give him advice (he would respect it from a dentist but not from me) and he will start doing them.

 

Had to cancel the appointment so no brushing for 6 weeks. He has very sore gums, tartar build up (we never managed to do them properly) and the dentist was no use at all, didnt speak much english and just told him he had to brush them. So she said come back in 4 weeks if there is no improveement we will take him off the records so he will not have a dentist! We are so lucky to have an NHS dentist, I really dont want this to happen. School nurse has been fab and said she will get some resources together to talk to him but with half term looming we wont have time to improve before the next appointment.

 

I have done a search and there are some great tips like use a flannel, will def try that but I cant see that getting rid of the build up. I want to call and speak to the manageer but dont know where I stand. Can I appeal on grounds of diability? If anyone has any advice I would be really grateful.

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Hi gigglinggoblin.

In our area there is a dental service that is specifically for people with additional needs.They look after people with SEN and disabilities including ASD.The staff are very aware of the needs of children with ASD .

I think the service in our area is provided by the primary care trust.The PCT is the part of the NHS which covers community NHS services such as GPs,dentists and pharmacists.

If you phone your local PCT they may be able to advise you regarding similar provision in your area.It does not sound like the current dentist is helpful at all.

Have you tried with an electric toothbrush.That may make it easier if you can persuade your child to cope with a toothbrush at all.

It is possible to use something like a piece of gauze dipped in mothwash for mouthcare.I have done that when I worked as a nurse for people who were very poorly and could not tolerate toothbrushing.It is also possible to use sponges attached to a stick [like a lolly stick].However it will not work as well as a toothbrush.Also there is a risk of being bitten in the process. :)

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I would have a word with the GP, he should be able to find a special needs dentist.

 

It's worth trying one of these. Collis-Curve toothbrush - A curved toothbrush which has been found to be suitable for individuals who normally have difficulty brushing their teeth. You could try googling it.

 

Good Luck.

 

Nellie xx

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Is your child able to chew gum , my dentist said a certain type of chewing gum can help with plaque build up. The only other thing is not to give your child anything that can cause tooth decay. I used to clean my sons teeth at night while he was asleep, I was at my wits end.

now he's OK with it, I think he thought the louder he shouted and banged his head on the wall, the more I would back down, but I just got fed up in the end and said - right we can stay here all night, and we did almost - the next night he was OK.

 

 

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My son hardly ever brushes his teeth. I have asked the Dentist to always tell him he needs to clean them better, even though his teeth are always fine (don't know how).

 

I have tried all sorts of toothpaste and brushes, but it makes no difference.

 

If his gums are sore, it will be very painful to brush his teeth, so it is a vicious circle.

 

I would investiagte the SEN Dentist (available through the NHS), as they will be very patient and understanding.

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Thank you so much for all the advice, I will look into a special needs dentist, if he ever has to have work done I think he will need sedation so better to be ready I guess. That toothbrush looks interesting, will have a look round for that too. Will buy gum, thats a good idea, he will like that. I am limiting sweets but he misses out on so much then, he hates feeling left out if all his brothers get ice cream or fizzy drinks. They dont have them all the time so its a treat and I think that makes him feel it more. We now have mouthwash, sometimes he will use it, sometimes not. I guess thats better than nothing!

 

For some reason this is the first time he has had a problem, how do they do it?? I was hoping he would get a lecture last time but his teeth were somehow ok which just gave him the message he didnt need to brush them!

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Thank you so much for all the advice, I will look into a special needs dentist, if he ever has to have work done I think he will need sedation so better to be ready I guess. That toothbrush looks interesting, will have a look round for that too. Will buy gum, thats a good idea, he will like that. I am limiting sweets but he misses out on so much then, he hates feeling left out if all his brothers get ice cream or fizzy drinks. They dont have them all the time so its a treat and I think that makes him feel it more. We now have mouthwash, sometimes he will use it, sometimes not. I guess thats better than nothing!

 

For some reason this is the first time he has had a problem, how do they do it?? I was hoping he would get a lecture last time but his teeth were somehow ok which just gave him the message he didnt need to brush them!

 

Hi.You might finds he needs sedation to have any work done.However with a few visits and a gradual introduction to a friendly ASD aware dentist you might not. :) Karen.

 

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Both my kids had problems with this. Mydaughter is worse than her brother was. We used a flannel for a long time and then a really small brush for baby teeth. We were advised by an OT specialising in Sensory integration disorder to rub her gums gently with a finger to help with the de-sensitisation. It has a bit. We also found a really groovy toothbrush that plays music louder as you brush.

My son even had to go to the dentist every few weeks at one point as the dentist was so patient and really helped him with the cleaning and build up. What made him do it more was as he hit his teenage years and started to take an interest in girls- then he had a real motivation to do it! He still has issues about brushes and certain pastes but he copes.

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I am glad it has become easier for your family, fingers crossed it will work for us too :)

 

I will get him to rub his gums and see how that works, it makes sense so its worth a try! Thanks for the tip

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