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pappy

Adult Aspergers assessment

61 posts in this topic

am seeing my Clinical psychology this week for the 2nd then the 3rd time on my 2nd visit am doing jigsaw puzzles and draw boxes and other things dont no what happens after that

 

I believe that you have to trust on the abilities of your clinical psychologist to draw the right conclusions, in doing so they have a number strategies and so sessions will be very different for every individual out there.

 

In a similar situation I wanted to control the situation at first and so would also get anxious about what was going to happen next in any psychological processes. I would even question what are we going to do in the next session, can I think it throug beforehand etc... Of course my psychologists knew I was then capable of turning up with pre prepared answers as a means of self protecting myself.

 

These thing are often not very easy, have trust in each other and be open and honest and see where it leads, I am sure it will work out well in the end.

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Started my DISCO assessment on Monday. The wife went with me and we were both asked lots of questions about me and my behavior etc. I have a further appointment to finish it on March 12th.

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Had my second appointment (DISCO) which went fine, lots of questions for my wive and me to answer and also looked at lots of "mood pics" and read some scenarios and answered. Have been given homework to write about my routines and what they mean to me etc and the same for my wife to write about me. 3rd and hopefully finally appointment on the 26th March.

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Pappy sounds like things are going well in the assesment process. Take things one step at a time, trust the process and be honest that's all that can be expected. These things take time and I believe that is a good thing for us as wee have to come to terms with and get comfortable with each stage,

 

best wishes, keep us all informed if you feel comfortable to do so. I suspect this is of great help for others looking on in similar situations.

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How'd you feel? :)

 

Initially, I was gutted :( I felt that I had let my wife & daughter down because of the confirmation I am an Aspie. I felt this way because all my life I have tried to be like NT types, failing miserably, mainly due to my complete disinterest in socialising, so now I know I'm an Aspie it's like there's a reason I'm the way I am and it can't be changed. I'm still coming to terms with my diagnosis (sound like a drama queen, I know) but I suppose once I start accepting the diagnosis and myself then I will feel better. I'm going to look for support groups which my assessor told me about and throw myself in. Maybe being around people like myself will help me feel more comfortable in my skin.

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I struggled too after mine - but things do get better - I haven't been to a group yet, but I think they are a good idea, have been considering it myself, and at least it gives you more knowledge and something to do while you try to process it. I think people can help sometimes.

 

And I guess at least you have some degree of explanation for the way you've felt in life (not about everything but I'm sure there are certain things that will suddenly make a hell of a lot of sense now).

 

Keep your chin up, things do get better :)

Edited by darkshine

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Congratulations on the diagnosis! You haven't let anyone down, and from here you can only understand yourself and how to deal with any problems you have better!

 

For all those looking for a diagnosis in the UK, the legislation call the Autism Act 2009 was a big milestone in Autism law and has more information on it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_Act_2009

 

It is meant to push the government, health service and local trusts to have in place a clear pathway for diagnosis for all(not just children, this focuses on adults) and the start of training and provision of services for those with ASD. In practice all of these things are still four years on relatively thin on the ground, especially dependent on the area you live.

 

The first step is contacting your GP. Go in with a list of symptoms after doing your own research, and also a list of difficulties you face. Detailing problems with socialising, interpersonal relationships and especially finding and holding work are really the things that will make the best case. Ask for a diagnosis from a someone who knows more and get them to clearly explain what will happen next.

 

You should then be referred to your local Primary Care Trust or PCT, which is really more about mental health, who may hold a meeting to determine your issues and needs, or a clinical psychologist who may be able to diagnose with the right expertise, or best of all a specialist local service which may or may not be government funded. The waiting list for a diagnosis, let alone help, may be long.

 

If you are not happy with your doctor or feel you have not been taken seriously or brushed off, make another appointment with a different doctor or surgery, you are completely within your rights to do so.

 

In the case that your area is not best equipped to help or there is a large waiting list, there may be a case for you to be sent to a different authority outside your area if funding is made possible. You can discuss this ith your doctor, but I would suggest using the National Autistic Society's Services Directory looking for diagnosis and support in your area here http://www.autism.org.uk/directory.aspx

 

Also e-mail the NAS or even join them! They are incredibly helpful and I could not recommend anyone more.

 

Pappy - Congratulations again, you've got further than many others have (including myself, now over a year waiting for an official diagnosis) and get reading on the subject, meet some others and keep posting if you ever need help :)

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I had an appointment yesterday with my GP, who told me that there is little to no funding for AS assessment in our PCT, and that unless I were to go private, I would be undiagnosed, although he is fairly confident (as are my family) that I have AS. How much would a private diagnosis set me back? The fact that the doctor suggested, unprompted, that AS might be behind my difficulties has helped a great deal, because finally someone externally has voiced the opinion. Seeking confirmation wouldn't be a life changer, so I don't see a reason why I should seek that piece of paper..

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Cambridgeshire

 

Went to see a doctor in my GP practise and he said adults cannot be diagnosed, when they had sent my adult son for diagnosis, Made an appt to see differant doctor in practise and have been referred to cambridge class, awaiting an important

Hi, i was also referred to CLASS,but my GP referred me immediately and I was 45. How did you get on? Thanks.

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I had an appointment yesterday with my GP, who told me that there is little to no funding for AS assessment in our PCT, and that unless I were to go private, I would be undiagnosed, although he is fairly confident (as are my family) that I have AS. How much would a private diagnosis set me back? The fact that the doctor suggested, unprompted, that AS might be behind my difficulties has helped a great deal, because finally someone externally has voiced the opinion. Seeking confirmation wouldn't be a life changer, so I don't see a reason why I should seek that piece of paper..

It's free, and you can be referred to CLASS,they consider anyone, from anywhere. A formal diagnosis will change your life for the better,believe me. I read the words..Diagnosis...Asperger Syndrome, it made me realise why I am am the way I am, you need written confirmation if you have it or not..go for it!!!

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After a little more than 14 months of waiting, my assessment starts today :) So far, I've heard that it consists of a cognitive assessment and a developmental history review. Is there anything else I need to know to better prepare myself for what's to come in my next sessions?

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The psychologist who did my assessment interviewed my husband. He said the best would be to interview my parents but that wasn’t possible. He asked my husband “Do you think she’s weird?”

 

 

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My 28 year old son has just had his diagnosis. His first appointment was in August and I went along with him purely to help him find where he had to go only to find that I was made more than welcome to attend the appointment too as it is very useful for the specialist to hear the views of someone who has known the person being assessed for a long time. After the first session (I think it was one and a half hours) we were both given long forms to fill in, in which we each gave our versions of how my son coped in certain situations, how be got on at school, etc., etc. We then had to post the forms back and after they had been studied we were both invited back for a two hour chat to discuss what we'd written. It transpired we saw a lot of things quite differently and we both got to hear each other's points of view which proved very helpful. In fact we had so much to say we only got through half the forms that day and had to go back for another two hour session. After that, all the detailed findings were put in a long report and we were invited back for one last two hour session to go through the report with the specialist and hear her verdict ... yes my son has AS.

 

We found the whole assessment a very positive experience, as both of us got a lot off our chests, and understand each other a lot better now.

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Hi, this is my first post.

 

im currently awaiting an assessment after asking my GP in november. He said it would probably be in London due to a lack of adult aspergers specilists locally (surrey). But, I recieved a letter from the local NAS ASSIST service saying I had been refered to them for a 45 minute appointment, I assume this is just an information on support session but was wondering if NAS are involved at all in the assessment (perhaps they make a judgement on whether they thing an assessment should be pursued?). I was wondering if anyone else has been refered to a NAS service first and what it involved (I have emailled asking them but I guess the holidays may mean they have a backlog).

 

Also, can anyone who was assessed in london (living either in london or outside) tell me how long they waited between seeing their GP and being formally assessed?

 

thanks

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Be aware that your GP may or may not know what they are talking about, and due to their egos some doctors will not have the integrity to admit that. If you do your own research, you may well be more informed than your GP. I say this from personal experience.

 

I did receive a formal diagnosis of Aspergers, eventually. It was quite a farce to get seen, but I ended up with an NHS Adult Aspergers clinic in Dorset. There was a six month wait. The actual diagnostic process took about five hours, over three appointments, over a three week period. A telephone interview with my mother about my early childhood was also part of the process. I am confident in this thorough assessment, and the detailed report.

 

Previously, I had actually been told by several "professionals" (who had not spent sufficient time with me) that I was "definitely not Aspergers". I now put this down to their "professional arrogance"; they were clearly responding to well known clichés about the syndrome, as opposed to the actual findings of specialists in the field of Adult Autism.

 

Being a "Spectrum" syndrome, one may have various Aspergers traits of varying degrees of severity, therefore being "on the spectrum" may be obvious or not. Adults tend to have spent their entire life subconsciously learning how to hide these odd characteristics, thus making adults more difficult to diagnose. The upshot is that an Aspie may suffer in silence, while the NT world expects normal behaviour, these demands can have a profound negative impact on the Aspies quality of life, bringing around anxiety, depression and isolation.

 

An accurate diagnosis is important. I also believe that a backlash of over-diagnosis' of Autism would have a negative effect on those who really require the compassion of the general public, so for this reason too, it is equally important that diagnosis aren't achieved without sufficient analysis.

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Can anyone offer advice on whether or not I should go for a formal diagnosis?

 

Now 59, I function pretty well in the world as long as I don't have to interact with other people. I have colleagues at work, and used to make myself go to social functions, but I could never think of anything to say and I don't go now. While at work I use 'we' a lot, giving the impression that I'm part of a couple. Similarly, I manage to drop phrases like 'a friend of mine' into conversation.

Outside work, I am friendly with my neighbours, but I present an NT front to them. I'd like to 'come out' about being Aspie, but it's a big step and, once done, can't be undone.

 

If I plucked up the courage to go to my GP, what would a formal diagnosis give me? I don't need financial support. What I really want to be more accepting of my condition, to meet people with whom I don't have to pretend to be NT, and maybe to have some sort of support network [emotional, not financial].

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Having read your post a few times and given it some thought, my response is: you want to be realistic about your expectations of other peoples reaction to your telling them you are an Aspie. I say this because I have found that a common response is one of indifference or condescension (as opposed to the desired recognition and understanding). The main benefit for me is that it has helped to substantiate my claims ESA and PIP (crucially alongside diagnosis of Chronic Hep C and Depression & Anxiety). This was helpful as I have been struggling to maintain work, and yet I can appear fit and competent to those without significant understanding of these conditions.

 

As for being able to be myself, this has really come from me and not from others. What I mean by this is: if the diagnosis helps you accept yourself and be less critical of your weaknesses, then you may be able to objectively appreciate your strengths too. I really needed this, but I still find I can feel inferior to NTs in social situations as a diagnosed Aspie, simply because it doesn't change the fact that often simple social interactions can be messy and incompetent when they "should" be routine. I also hoped that my family would acknowledge Aspergers, but they are unwilling to talk about it at all, even when I've mentioned it; (they just move swiftly on).

 

Having a diagnosis may give you permission to be yourself more, and in this respect it seems worthwhile. It doesn't really facilitate the compassion of those you speak to in my experience, and you can't easily say to everyone you meet: "I have Aspergers - please be tolerant of my atypical demeanor". It's just not appropriate or practical, of course.

 

When I first "came out" (as you put it :)) I felt somewhat vindicated, although I had mixed emotions about now being a confirmed Aspie. 13 months later I think I actually take more responsibility for misconstructions that arise. While it's still difficult, when things go wrong I can say to myself that I did my best.

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Wow I've got all this to come.

 

I was made aware of my differences in 2007 bit didn't get round to talking to the doctor until 2 months ago.

 

Been trying to push the speed of things by directly contacting the tuke centre.

 

Fingers crossed eh

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I've got my appointment in May. I really hope I get diagnosed. I would be so depressed if I didn't.

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