Jump to content


Photo

What is your experience learning to drive.


  • Please log in to reply
78 replies to this topic

#1 On Board

On Board

    Norfolk Broads

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lanarkshire,Scotland

Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:27 AM

Hi,

This is my first post and I hope to get information from the experience of forum members in relation to learning to drive with Aspergers and ASD.

I have been a driving instructor for over ten years and now manage a team of 40 instructors who provide lessons both on the road and at two venues in Central Belt of Scotland on private ground off road to help younger people or people not as confident get started at build their confidence and ability.

Over the years we have taught numerous people with Aspergers, Autism, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia etc and have used our collective experience to assist these new drivers.

A number of our instructors are studying a year long driving coaching course to further develop thier self awareness and student centred teaching skills and the skills being fine tuned really help.

I was at an Autism Awareness Course this week and I found it very good and I was delighted when three of the instructors I went with who are also doing the Btec Coaching course commented that - it doesn't really change what we are doing as we should already be treating every student as an individual and should be aware of what they need as the student and provide the best thing for them and the student can help us achieve that by coming up with their own solutions - I thought YES!

I am hoping through this forum and this initial topic I can get information from members about the experience they or family members had learning to drive. I hope to get the good things that helped and the not so good which resulted in barriers or a reluctance to see it through.

This way we can help others by getting it right for them.

Thanks again, Brian

Edited by On Board, 15 October 2011 - 07:30 AM.


#2 Sally44

Sally44

    K2

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5045 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:East Midlands

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:26 AM

My son is 10+, so no where near the age to drive a car.
But he does drive a 100cc quad bike on private land.

These are a few things he finds difficult, which may/maynot still be there by the time he wants to learn to drive.

He finds it very hard to change focus eg. finds it hard to drive and hold a conversation. If I ask him a question he either appears deaf [because he's focused on the driving], or he tries to answer and then is unable to monitor his driving. He has nearly crashed into hedges a couple of times because i've asked him a question and distracted him.

And similarly if he is in the process of carrying out a sequence of things, if he is distracted he loses his place within the process and has to start again from the beginning.

From a driving instructor point of view, cutting down the amount of language used whilst driving would be critical for my son. Also checking his understanding of what you want him to do could be backed up with pictures or drawings because often he thinks he has got the message, but he hasn't and he has interpreted it wrong and has no idea of that.

He would also struggle with changes in the car itself eg. reverse gear is different etc.

He often complains that cars smell bad. I think it is the plastic smell inside them. So a pleasant air freshener can help with that.

#3 bid

bid

    K2

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7649 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:01 AM

Hi Brian,

I'm an adult with AS. I found I couldn't manage the multi-tasking involved in driving a manual, but had no problems learning in an automatic.

There seems to be a really silly prejudice against automatics. What matters is becoming independent, so I would say encourage people to consider an automatic rather than struggling on with a manual, which can really undermine confidence. I found I was getting dreadful headaches just through stress when I was learning in a manual, but was on top of the world after my first lesson in an automatic.

I would also suggest considering visual aids. For example, I needed an actual map of the town where I learnt to drive, as just driving round it wasn't enough for me to learn the various routes. I needed to be able to see them on paper to understand and learn them.

Bid :)

Edited by bid, 15 October 2011 - 09:04 AM.


#4 dekra

dekra

    Ben Nevis

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 307 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:04 AM

Hi Brian, I don't have anything to add that's helpful but I think I saw an advertising board for you guys in Braehead last weekend. Both hubby and I thought it was a good idea.

#5 Tally

Tally

    K2

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6329 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Epsom Downs

Posted 15 October 2011 - 02:11 PM

My biggest difficulty is probably anticipating what other drivers are going to do, especially now that people rarely use their indicators. When cars are waiting at a junction or roundabout, I can't tell from their position in the road which way they want to turn, and am often too hesitant when other drivers can tell it would have been safe to go. Occasionally I get a driver behind me that gets very angry when I miss a gap, and they start tooting, which makes me anxious and even more hesitant, which makes them even more angry.

Another thing which could be a difficulty in ASD, is that we can be very rule-bound, and sometimes other drivers do not obey the rules. If someone looks like they are going to break the rules, it's not safe to assume they won't do that just because it's against the rules. There is a roundabout I have to use to get home from work, where it is very common for people to pull out on you when you are already on the roundabout. If I just ignored them because they are breaking the rules, I would have an accident about once per week on this roundabout. Yes, they would be held liable for my repairs, but I would be risking injury. It is much safer to prepare for the possibility and avoid an accident.

#6 lilnicki

lilnicki

    Salisbury Hill

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:20 PM

I took about 80 (oh dear) lessons to learn to drive......my first problem seemed to be that i couldn't concentrate on too many things at once........which gear to which speed etc ( i now have an automatic which makes things easier)..... i also struggled with my instructors method of teaching which was basically to let me get on with it, then use the dual controls when i did something dumb ( often!)......i think on my second lesson i remember approaching a roundabout, and i didn't know what to do, so he had to do an emergency stop....... i think for an Aspie it would be more useful to give constant instruction, at least initially until you have the hang of it. One other thing was the language he used.....ie trying to parallel park......he would say "left hand down".....what the h*ll does that mean??..... when i parallel park both my hands go up and down the steering wheel...... he should have said "clock" or "anti".....which would have been more helpful to me.

Hope this has been of some use ( oh and i still can't parallel park!!)

Nicki

#7 Lyndalou

Lyndalou

    Mt Blanc

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Aberdeenshire
  • Interests:Juggling (time, people and everything else)

    My main interests are human anthropology, psychology/mental health and history (mainly Scottish, Egyptian and Roman). I love watching forensic type or detective programmes and reading books of the same - my husband jokes that I am planning the perfect murder! I enjoy taking photographs and have a few little projects on the go :-)

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:19 PM

Over the years I had a ridiculous amount of lessons...6 periods of lessons with huge gaps between between the ages of 18 and when I eventually passed 2 years ago at 36. Every time I started again, I optimistically thought I would pass in the 'normal' amount of lessons before I ran out of cash because I'd done it before. My last lot of lessons combined an intensive course at the end of which I had no hope of passing the test and then 2x2 hourly lessons for weeks after - in all 70+ hours. 3 tests later and I got my license!!!!

My main problem was being able to co-ordinate all the various pedals / indicators / checking mirrors / using the brake pedal / looking ahead at traffic and road signs simultaneously because I was concentrating on going through all the sequences and found it difficult to alter timings and to allow for unforeseen things. Clutch control was always a problem and still is if I am a bit tired or distracted or wearing shoes with any heel. I found that I had to wear the same flat shoes for every lesson which helped.

Part of the problem was that as time wore on, I started becoming more and more upset with myself for everything not clicking and I took that frustration into the car and when I made any mistakes on some lessons I became angry or burst into tears (Gawd, my instructor kept her patience!!)- on one lesson after 10 minutes I just asked the instructor to drive me home. I chewed gum which helped me concentrate and when my instructor got to know when I was getting upset she would direct me to park up and we would do 'dry runs'. I think these probably helped because I could visualise the sequences without the added pressure of actually driving!

#8 Kazzen161

Kazzen161

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2272 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 15 October 2011 - 10:14 PM

Once my son found the right instructor for him, he was OK. However the test situation was very difficult for him. He found it hard to be with someone he had never met before and he found one examiner's voice hard to tolerate. Maybe some test practise with different instructors would have helped?

#9 On Board

On Board

    Norfolk Broads

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lanarkshire,Scotland

Posted 15 October 2011 - 11:28 PM

Once my son found the right instructor for him, he was OK. However the test situation was very difficult for him. He found it hard to be with someone he had never met before and he found one examiner's voice hard to tolerate. Maybe some test practise with different instructors would have helped?


Hi,

Thanks for the replies so far.

We are not the driving school advertised in the Glasgow Shopping Centre and you will find we provide the service from Age 10 and at half their price, so excellent value.

We have had meetings with the student and examiners before going for tests to help students get used to the examiner and at times this has been more than once which does help and we also encourage the instructors to use other instructors with us to go out with their students for the additional experience.

I think it is good to be able to visualise the experience with dry runs or the instructor doing a demo of what is expected - I do understand it must be a careful choice of words for the visualisation.

Please keep any replies coming I do appreciate this.

Thanks again, Brian

#10 caci

caci

    Snowdon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 216 posts

Posted 16 October 2011 - 11:31 AM

Sorry to hi-jack this tread, but does anyone know of a driving centre in South East Engand (preferably SE London) ,
where kids can get driving experience ?

Our son is 13, and as big as me, so a normal car would be fine, but I would like to find somewhere he can get a little experience before he applies for his license at 17.

#11 Canopus

Canopus

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2093 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 October 2011 - 01:17 PM

I have a few point to make.

Lane discipline. Something I have always had difficulty with. There must be some art to reading the road to identify which lane goes in which direction at junctions.

Large roundabouts. I found them very confusing and every roundabout appears to have its own idiosyncratic rules.

Teaching the student how to use the tachometer when changing gears is a great help. Most cars nowadays have one fitted but driving instructors don't always explain it.

There seems to be a really silly prejudice against automatics. What matters is becoming independent, so I would say encourage people to consider an automatic rather than struggling on with a manual, which can really undermine confidence.


I have been wondering whether automatics might be more popular in the future. We have a generation of teenagers that's lost much experience in shifting gears and driving instructors know it all too well.

#12 trekster

trekster

    Mt McKinley

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3600 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:nr Bristol
  • Interests:stamp collecting, cross stitching, playmobil, star trek, liverpool fc, computers

Posted 28 October 2011 - 12:48 PM

I have difficulties with vague feedback and instructions.
Having a mixture of my strengths in driving and also my weaknesses was beneficial.
Also at the end of the lesson knowing what was likely to be shown during the next 1

I had to take my theory test twice and found discussing the confusing parts of the
theory test with my instructor in practical ways helped me for my retake.

I wanted to have a real driving experience not a 'I cant drive unless my passengers
are quiet and avoid speaking to me' experience. I had the understanding that conversation
whilst on lesson could happen but if I needed to follow an instruction he would have to
interrupt.

#13 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 12 November 2011 - 10:13 PM

Had some lessons a while back in a manual car with a small company who do not know I have anything "wrong" with me - was better than I thought I'd be - did struggle with some instructions and vagueness, and roundabouts took a while to understand for some odd reason I just can't tell what people are intending to do when its busy :lol: get accused of hesitating when I am merely waiting as I feel I have the time :rolleyes: and learning about the clutch and what it does (as in other than changing gears) stupid things really... oh and cost that's probably a big issue for more than just me :wallbash:

#14 Aeolienne

Aeolienne

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1123 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leamington Spa, Warks
  • Interests:Baroque music, green issues (esp. renewable energy), hillwalking, Quakerism, reading (astronomy, fiction, popular science), practical conservation, art exhibitions, royal-watching

Posted 12 April 2012 - 02:50 PM

NB: What follows, is not, repeat not, intended to be amusing in any way whatsoever. Please do not LOL in any replies.

I can't remember how many lessons I had - I'd long lost count - only that I'd had four different instructors and two failed attempts before I passed at the age of 19. This was before the theory test was introduced.

My first instructor (who was assigned to me for no better reason than that he'd taught my brother) made me a nervous wreck. A typical blast from him would be "Didn't you know you were supposed to change down a gear before turning?" which put me on the spot. If I said "Yes" he'd yell "Then why the hell didn't you?"; if I said "No" he'd yell "Why the hell didn't you know?" On the 30th lesson my mum sat in the back of the car (at the instructor's request) and realised that a change would do me good, so we used the excuse of wanting a female instructor. So I switched, but eventually instructor #2 had to give up driving because of a hysterectomy so I was moved to the man who is now her husband. I didn't take the test until over a year after starting lessons, and despite my instructor opting for the Barnet test route because it was easier than Hendon which was the nearest, I failed. I didn't resume lessons until my second term at St Andrews uni, where I took the test twice on the Cupar route.

Unfortunately even after I passed I continued to remain nervous behind the wheel. Things were made even worse at my first graduate job, when I had a minor accident driving one of the company's pool cars. I feel nervous just writing about this here, because I soon learnt that other people found this inexplicably funny - I guess a lot of humour relies on schadenfreude. There seems to be this belief that once you have passed the test you should feel comfortable driving any model of car, yet I seem to be the exception.

I've never had my own car. In Exeter (where I lived for the longest) I'm not sure where I would have parked one. It would have been more of an advantage when I worked in Skipton, as the public-transport route to the out-of-town business park was at best tiresome, at worst nightmarish (I'm referring specifically to crossing the A59 on a dark November evening and then finding that the bus drivers couldn't see me to stop). But as so often in life, I hesitated, and when I lost the job after five months there didn't seem any point in buying a car.

But how do you overcome driving nerves if you don't own a car? Someone once suggested the advanced driving course, but when I contacted the Exeter branch of the IAM I found they expected you to have your own car, otherwise I guess it would be like going for a piano exam without an instrument to practise on. I was further confused when I learnt that RoSPA also does an advanced driving test - which is better?

In 2009 I did Pass Plus in Exeter, and earned praise from my parents when I next drove their car along a stretch of the M6. Alas, the same motorway has proved my undoing - last week as I was driving to the Lake District with my dad in the passenger seat I failed to slow down soon enough when I pulled off at junction 36 and hit the crash barrier on the roundabout. Thanks to the airbags we survived: me with bruising to the knee and clavicle, my poor dad with extensive bruising to the ribcage and hips, although not enough to need hospital treatment. I've been charged with driving without due care and attention, but may be able to avoid the six points on my licence by doing a police-endorsed driving course. But will I ever feel safe behind the wheel?

#15 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 12 April 2012 - 05:26 PM

Sounds like you've generally had such an awful experience that its all had a lasting effect...

Maybe you will feel safe behind the wheel one day - there might be a certain car you like or you might do some more classes or courses for driving practice - but I think the main issue is confidence and from the terrible start you had with an rubbish, angry and impatient teacher it might take you a fair amount of time to undo that damage - or the right teacher :)

#16 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 12 April 2012 - 06:29 PM

When I learnt to drive you had to have a man walking from with a red flag. Well maybe not but you were restricted to a max speed of 30 untill you had past your test. I had about 20 lessons, on the day of the test someone who I had never met, with a car I had never driven turned up from the driving school. I failed. I put in strait away for a sort notice test, got one about 12 days later. I didn't have anymore lessons and took the test in my own car. in a area I had never driven in before. I was due to go on a driving holiday about 3 weeks later. So not a lot of pressure. I past. The first thing I did was go for a long drive down the duel carriageway, Not many motorways about then, It was only then that I found out how long it takes to stop when going at speed. In them days few cars had power brakes or power steering. It wasn't long before my dad let me drive his Zephyr 6 A monster of a car that would do well over 100, weighing in at 2 tones. Never got stopped by the police, they couldn't keep up.

Edited by chris54, 12 April 2012 - 07:33 PM.


#17 Aeolienne

Aeolienne

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1123 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leamington Spa, Warks
  • Interests:Baroque music, green issues (esp. renewable energy), hillwalking, Quakerism, reading (astronomy, fiction, popular science), practical conservation, art exhibitions, royal-watching

Posted 12 April 2012 - 09:17 PM

Maybe you will feel safe behind the wheel one day - there might be a certain car you like

I do have a soft spot for Toyota Priuses and Trabants - well, they're the only car models that make me turn my head.
Slightly O/T but as a teenager it took me ages to learn the rules about how different car types were regarded. E.g. that you were supposed to be impressed by a Porsche and sneer at a Skoda (or at least you did 20 years ago). And like so many NT norms it baffled me. It also puzzled me why other teenage girls got all dewy-eyed over a bloke just because he had a car - hadn't society moved on from the mores depicted in 'Summer Loving' in Grease? Or were they being ironic? Who knows.

#18 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:36 PM

Who knows... people have some weird social conventions... the old Skoda's were pretty ugly compared to the ones they do now though... My favourite cars back then were unpopular with most people to say the least (this is out of everyday cars that most people could afford) and they were the VW Camper Van, VW Beetle (I once saw a black one with dark red seats like a goth mobile it actually looked kinda cool with painted flames behind the front wheels and massive chrome dual exhausts at the back) and thirdly and most weirdly I liked Mini's I swore for years I'd get a british racing green one :rolleyes: so childish!

Toyota's are ok - its hard nowadays to decide because there's all sorts of stuff to consider... On the one hand I'd like something that could go fast - but on the other hand, sensible, more eco friendly cars are much cheaper on the pocket and the environment... And of course it makes sense to buy a from a manufacturer who sells the parts at a reasonable cost (some are incredibly expensive or hard to get as they need to be ordered specially). Which in my opinion then leaves a mildly boring selection to choose from.

Not that I can afford a car anyway :lol: and I don't have my licence yet either! I've had about 10 lessons (sporadically over the last 6 months) and I still need to do the theory test - sigh - so complicated... I'd like to do the pass plus test as it covers different types of driving and I would also consider doing an advanced drivers test as well.

But having said that I'd pretty much like to try most types of driving... :D

#19 Aeolienne

Aeolienne

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1123 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leamington Spa, Warks
  • Interests:Baroque music, green issues (esp. renewable energy), hillwalking, Quakerism, reading (astronomy, fiction, popular science), practical conservation, art exhibitions, royal-watching

Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:32 PM

I do have a soft spot for Toyota Priuses and Trabants - well, they're the only car models that make me turn my head.

Add the Nissan Leaf to that. :peace:

#20 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:18 PM

I read a review on that a while back, this journalist had been loaned one to try it out, it wasn't a bad review the only thing he moaned about was the charging time and that it didn't last long enough :)

#21 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 14 April 2012 - 03:57 PM

I have an allegro for a few years, the one with the square steering wheel. It was a 1750cc 5 speed box. If you needed spare parts for the engine you had to make sure you got the right ones as it apparently was fitted (from new) with the "Wrong" engine.

#22 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 15 April 2012 - 12:04 PM

Was it fitted with the "wrong" engine on purpose? ;)

#23 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:09 PM

Apparently some were fitted with engines that were originally intended for a different modal of car. There appeared to be no record of this in the parts list, it was only the experience of mechanics finding bits didn't fit. When you got parts you had to say to the parts people that it had the non standard engine or you got the wrong parts, certain bits had to be those intended for this other modal. "Fred" in the back room would say "I know the bit you need". "Your need an oil filter from a xyz for that."

Back then when you didn't need a degree in computer science to fix cars, I did a lot of taking apart and putting back together.

Edited by chris54, 15 April 2012 - 01:11 PM.


#24 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:26 PM

I bet that threw you the first time you needed a part!

It's weird when I look at a car engine now (which was 2 weeks ago for a quick glance for sort of revision for that part of the driving test) I used to watch my grandpa fix his cars regularly and it was interesting to watch him, I had a neighbour that was teaching me bits about it but he moved away... its amazing how much they have changed... the engine I looked at was only about 7 years old but was still completely encased/covered.

It's more like computer science these days as opposed to mechanics :rolleyes:

Edited by darkshine, 15 April 2012 - 01:27 PM.


#25 Aeolienne

Aeolienne

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1123 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leamington Spa, Warks
  • Interests:Baroque music, green issues (esp. renewable energy), hillwalking, Quakerism, reading (astronomy, fiction, popular science), practical conservation, art exhibitions, royal-watching

Posted 23 April 2012 - 12:18 PM

Some perspectives on living without a car (or not). Funny how it's the Londoner who is most attached to her car!
http://www.guardian....3/features11.g2

#26 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:22 PM

Fine to say don't drive, it does depend a lot on where you live as to how that affects you.

I live in a village, we do have a bus and train service. The bus and train runs from early morning till late afternoon, buses every 2 hours. Trains about every1 or 2 hours. No buses at the weekend. No trains on Sunday. These get you into the next town, from there you then need to change for ongoing journeys.

My stepdaughter has to go each week for a half hour appointment, often twice a week, associated with being unemployed in a town about 12 miles away. Because of the trains times and connections she has to go out at 8.30am in the morning and doesn't return untill about 4pm.

Ill let you decide what life would be like without a car.

Edited by chris54, 23 April 2012 - 01:23 PM.


#27 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 April 2012 - 02:33 PM

Ill let you decide what life would be like without a car.


It would be like my life - difficult!!!!

I like to be environmentally friendly - within reason - and cars really cost a lot of money too - but to me, having a car would be freedom, I could get to places that are just too far for me to manage on public transport and as such my quality of life would improve dramatically.

When someone visits me for a few days or a week and they have a car its so much easier!!!

Like food shopping for example. It currently takes approx 90 minutes to 2 hours to do. On the rare occasion I do it I am just exhausted afterwards from the stresses of negotiating round travel issues and the length of time it takes - this is without other difficulties I have.

When my parents visit with their car it takes 45 minutes and I'm so much less tired and stressed afterwards.

I really want to get my license - even though I can't afford a car - I know that if I can one day, then at least I have a license to drive it.

#28 oxgirl

oxgirl

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3806 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:54 PM

My lad is 18 and just starting to express an interest in driving one day. He admits that he doesn't think he's ready yet, but in a year or two maybe. For my part, I really can't see him coping. He has never mastered riding a bike and even if he did now, I couldn't see him coping on the road, as his road sense is not good at all. Maybe in a couple of years he'll be more aware, but at the moment I couldn't imagine that he'd be able to maintain concentration long enough to drive safely, nor would he cope with taking in everything around him that other drivers are doing all at the same time and being aware of what their intentions are as well as mastering the actual physical part of controlling the car. I just can't see it at all.

~ Mel ~

#29 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 April 2012 - 08:30 PM

I used to sit in the passenger seat and pay attention which helped. As did reading the highway code. The main thing I have an issue with is the way the instructor says the exit on a island/roundabout...

There's also computer programs that teach the hazard perception test that are excellent for learning how to look ahead and think. I have one by DSL (driving skills for life) 2012 version that has so much info on it - plus it has the theory test stuff on there too. It was a tenner from WHSmiths - and well worth the money as it also has the highway code and a video of someone taking their driving test. Plus there's a couple of games to ease the mind :lol:

I'd recommend this to anyone even thinking of driving - before they have a lesson - I wish I'd had this software years ago - much better than a book and cheaper!!!

#30 Aeolienne

Aeolienne

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1123 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leamington Spa, Warks
  • Interests:Baroque music, green issues (esp. renewable energy), hillwalking, Quakerism, reading (astronomy, fiction, popular science), practical conservation, art exhibitions, royal-watching

Posted 25 April 2012 - 03:32 PM

One aspect of learning to drive that bugged me was the jargon. People would ask me if I'd done the three-point turn yet and I'd say no, without realising that in fact I had but under a different name. My instructor called it "turning in the road using forward and reverse gears". Does that seem really weird? Maybe a lot of you now are shouting at the computer screen "But how could you not know they are one and the same thing?" It's a problem that has bugged me in other areas of life, especially at job interviews.

#31 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 25 April 2012 - 05:03 PM

3 point turn is the term that is commonly used, but for purposes of the test it is not as it implies the number of times you go forward and backward in order to turn the vehicle. You may need to do a 5 point or even a 7 point turn dependant on the road and the vehicle you are driving. Both of which may be acceptable to the examiner. You would be unlikely to need to use more than a 3 point turn if you are taking your test in a stander car and the examiner has selected a suitable road.

Edited by chris54, 25 April 2012 - 05:03 PM.


#32 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:56 AM

They've changed the terminology to turn in the road now in the 4 books I have and the CD-rom (all dated 2011 to 2012) just to confuse us all - it was definitely turn in the road in the 90's though...

My personal pet hate is the island vs roundabout one - I prefer the term island - while my driving teacher says roundabout.

To me a roundabout is the thing in a kids playground :bounce:

#33 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 26 April 2012 - 12:16 PM

island vs roundabout


Don't realy see what you mean, The island is the bit in the middle of the roundabout, you also get island in other parts of the road.(At crossings)
Not all roundabout have a island in the middle, so large vehicles can just go over the top of them. (mini roundabouts).
And some roundabout are so big its hard to recognise them as such, The sort you sometimes get at motorway interchanges.
Of course if a roundabout has traffic lights then it not a roundabout, its a gyratory system. Not sure what the ones with part time traffic light are.

Edited by chris54, 26 April 2012 - 12:34 PM.


#34 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 April 2012 - 06:04 PM

Its cuz my family all say islands to mean roundabouts

And roundabouts are known as the spinning wooden and metal structure in children's playgrounds

Now I find out that roundabouts are in fact the things I have been referring to as islands for most of my life - its hard to remember sometimes that's all :blink: and it sounds stupid because of my previous understandings of the words.

Edited by darkshine, 26 April 2012 - 06:05 PM.


#35 Canopus

Canopus

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2093 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 May 2012 - 06:08 PM

My lad is 18 and just starting to express an interest in driving one day. He admits that he doesn't think he's ready yet, but in a year or two maybe. For my part, I really can't see him coping. He has never mastered riding a bike and even if he did now, I couldn't see him coping on the road, as his road sense is not good at all. Maybe in a couple of years he'll be more aware, but at the moment I couldn't imagine that he'd be able to maintain concentration long enough to drive safely, nor would he cope with taking in everything around him that other drivers are doing all at the same time and being aware of what their intentions are as well as mastering the actual physical part of controlling the car. I just can't see it at all.

~ Mel ~


An alternative to a car is a drivable lawnmower or similar category K vehicle. These can legally be driven solo on a provisional licence providing L plates are attached. I'm not sure whether removing the blades from a lawnmower will move it into a category B1 vehicle.

#36 robert7111a

robert7111a

    Mt Blanc

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 729 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:London

Posted 31 May 2012 - 09:33 PM

I learnt to drive later in life simply because I never had the need to own a car. My parents never owned a car and we walked everywhere as work/school was at most, 3 miles away.

The first "lot" of lessons I had was with a very well known national driving school where the instructor treated me like a dork. He didn't know I had anything wrong with me. After 8 lessons, I "sacked" the company and went with an independent bloke who treated me like a proper human being and I passed first time. I couldn't wait to get out on the motorway in my "new" second-hand battered Astra just weeks before my daughter was born. I have driven trains before on British Rail but obviously these are different monsters.

I don't have problems multitasking in a car apart from not being able to concentrate properly with passengers and the radio going at the same time.

#37 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 01 June 2012 - 12:20 PM

Cool - what was driving a train like? I've met a few train drivers and some say they saw some messed up things but the most interesting was this one guy who thought he was gonna hit a person on the tracks and it turned out to be a ghost - this guy 100% believed that - and it was interesting listening to him describe that.

One train I went on I could smell the driver or guard was smoking something other than ciggies which is pretty bad :lol:

#38 chris54

chris54

    Kilimanjaro

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1828 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:lincolnshire

Posted 01 June 2012 - 12:47 PM

My step son is a but driver, One of their windups for passengers is to put on the dark glasses, then walk out to the bus carrying a white stick, arm in arm with another driver, then get in the drivers seat and drive off.

#39 robert7111a

robert7111a

    Mt Blanc

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 729 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:London

Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:59 PM

Cool - what was driving a train like?


The first time, gave me a real rush. I was 16 and driving an electric passenger train (with driver watching) which was illegal. But in those days, drivers could flaunt the rules before the H&S stepped in

And you didn't have all the idiots who cut you up, didn't indicate, etc etc

#40 darkshine

darkshine

    Mt McKinley

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3636 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 01 June 2012 - 09:11 PM

My step son is a but driver, One of their windups for passengers is to put on the dark glasses, then walk out to the bus carrying a white stick, arm in arm with another driver, then get in the drivers seat and drive off.




I bet that got some funny reactions - assuming people even noticed :D

Edited by darkshine, 01 June 2012 - 09:12 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users