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Aeolienne

Yet another Aspie-friendly software testing company

17 posts in this topic

After Specialisterne from Denmark, Aspiritech from the USA and the UK's own AutismWorks comes Passwerk from Belgium.

 

http://www.passwerk.be

Passwerk is a unique concept, a unique company with unique people.
Passwerk employs the qualities of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with normal ability, in software testing activities.

 

er... so not very unique actually. To paraphrase Henry Ford, it would seem that the business model for Aspie-friendly employment is "you can have any job you want, so long as it involves software testing". Yawn - wake me up when someone realises that Aspies have other interests.

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"Because of their autism spectrum disorder, Passworkers have special qualities. The combination of their innate natural talents with professional training and coaching sees Passworkers excel at software testing (system tests, user acceptance tests and regression tests) and quality assurance assignments (for instance drawing up user instruction manuals, data cleansing, data and text migration, data checks, data entry, interactive scanning, etc.), amongst other duties."

 

Taken from their website, includes a few other talents. Also the company is probably unique in belgium.

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not in English

Click on the Union Jack flag.

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er... so not very unique actually. To paraphrase Henry Ford, it would seem that the business model for Aspie-friendly employment is "you can have any job you want, so long as it involves software testing". Yawn - wake me up when someone realises that Aspies have other interests.

 

I was thinking along similar lines.

 

Earlier this year I attended a meeting about setting up an AS friendly company based around microcontrollers and embedded systems as there would be more diversity than with software testing - such as CAD of board layouts, electromagnetic compatibility, digital and analogue electronics - in addition to software but not a lot has materialised so far.

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Earlier this year I attended a meeting about setting up an AS friendly company based around microcontrollers and embedded systems as there would be more diversity than with software testing - such as CAD of board layouts, electromagnetic compatibility, digital and analogue electronics - in addition to software but not a lot has materialised so far.

Let's hope it's more successful than Specialisterne Scotland.

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On a related note, a cyber security consultancy based in Harrow: securItISm

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And another one in London: Aspietec. Aren't we imaginative...

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And in Canada: Meticulon.

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And another one in the US: ULTRA Testing

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There appears to be a lot of organisations that are testing for autism but very few helping people with their lives after the diagnosis is that because it's cheaper to diagnose it than help people live their lives with it because they may need support and that costs money.

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This organisation isnt testing for autism it's trying to employ autistics to test computer systems. Diagnosis doesnt always equal support unfortunately. You still have to full-fill their criterion for support or benefits.

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Without support why bother testing people, it's false hope if you are autistic looking for support after a diagnosis then to be told sorry there is no support. Where are we supposed to go or do what is beyond the capability of an autistic person, it's no surprise there are so many depressed people turning to alcohol and drugs just to get through the day some even commit suicide who cares for these people.

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If you would like to meet asperger/autistic folk before your diagnosis try contacting andrew powell, andrew.powell@nas.org.uk

He works at the create centre in bristol (which you can access if you live in bristol) which once a week has activities at the

autism centre. They also run an autism diagnostic process.

 

http://www.awp.nhs.uk/services/specialist/autism-spectrum/diagnostic-process/

 

There are aspies who manage to function without support and ones who struggle without support or even to get a diagnosis.

 

In Bristol there is BASS also in south gloucestershire. They run autism advice services.

 

For other types of support eg community care you still have to prove you fullfill their criterion.

If you can describe your needs without a diagnosis in some cases you can qualify for disability benefits.

 

http://www.autism.org.uk/living-with-autism/benefits-and-community-care.aspx

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I have tried to access these services but because I live just outside the Bristol Boundaries I am not allowed to attend the Bristol group.

The one I am supposed to attend is in Yate and that is a minimum of two buses and approximately a two hour bus trip so combined that will mean at least four hours travelling on public transport. That with the meeting will be a whole day and I have problems using public transport alone especially in the busy periods so getting there is not feasible.

I have spoken to one of the social workers there and they don't visit people so I would have to get there myself which I can't do.

I could be given an assessment for an adult social worker but have been told because there is no financial support only the very worst cases are going to get help.

He could put me in for an assessment but because I am not one of the worse cases it's very unlikeliest I will be helped.

I live with my mother and partner who assist in ways that keep me homed and deal with my finances so that apparently does not make me worthy of help.

My partner and mother are both physically disabled and can't travel for such a long time to come with me to the centre.

I can take the bus if it's very few people which isn't often but if it gets busy people a

Lot around or they sit next to you I have to get off the bus wherever I am and walk to my destination.

It's about nine miles to Yate from where I live and it's too great a distance to walk to and home again so I can not get any help, how can having to use two buses and a four hour trip alone be helping somebody with autism.

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You could ask for a carers assessment for your mother and partner

 

http://www.autism.org.uk/living-with-autism/benefits-and-community-care/community-care-for-adults/support-for-carers.aspx

 

The new care act means by law you have to be offered a carers assessment, thats how my family got help. We were told

i couldnt get any help so my gran ended up at social services begging them before she got a carers assessment and i got

home help. i got home help on the grounds my gran could no longer cope with caring for me on top of her own health needs.

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This article mentions Specialisterne, Aspiritech and ULTRA Testing:

"Autism Without Fear: Don’t Get TOO Excited About Autism Employment Initiatives"

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-john-carley/autism-without-fear-dont-_2_b_9365380.html

Edited by Aeolienne

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