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Sensitive Teeth


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#1 Stephanie

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 01:35 PM

My 5 year old is suffering from sensitive teeth, the Dentist had a look and said there were no cavities but obviously the enamel had worn thin on a few places and every time he had something sugary or sweet, they hurt him.

He brushes them twice a day but he does eat a lot of rubbish due to his limited diet. Always has reduced sugar drinks etc. and water at school and at night.

The dentist gave him a fluoride mouthwash but it isn't helping. He just uses normal milk teeth toothpaste and then uses the mouthwash ... Aquafresh Mouthwhoosh I think it is called.

I heard about fissure sealants but my Dentist didn't mention them, even though I just checked his website and they do them there, but it says between the ages of 6-11.

Anyone had similar, used any particular products that helped??

The only saving grace is that he isn't eating sweets anymore! Bless him, he is in agony with them.

#2 Bagpuss

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 01:39 PM

Have you tried sensodyne? Either brush with it or rub it on. Would also ring dentist and check when your son can definately have fissure sealants and get him booked in. My son had fissure sealants a few years back (hes 12 now), but it was for his back molars, a coating put over the top of them.

Good luck Stephanie

#3 sue1957

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 06:14 PM

Fluoride is my pet hate. From when he started brushing his teeth to when he was four when we finally realised what was causing it, my son had light sensitivity, water phobia, lining things up etc etc. He was also food phobic, which left him malnourished, and with sore gums and sensitive teeth.

Changing to a non fluoride toothpaste made a huge difference. Fluoride is neurotoxic, and some people just don't excrete it very well. Absorbed through the gums or swallowed when brushing the teeth, mouthwashes, maybe even the water supply fluoridated, wacko.gif I've heard of some people using some of the mouthwashes you can buy to treat headlice. sad.gif

The fluoridealert.org website has a health effects database

http://www.fluoridealert.org/health/

#4 Canopus

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 10:55 PM

The water in Birmingham and the surrounding area has been fluoridated since the 1960s. A few other places are also fluoridated including North Tyneside. There are plans to fluoridate all of England and the NHS is backing it.

#5 sue1957

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 04:30 PM

QUOTE (Canopus @ Jul 2 2006, 11:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The water in Birmingham and the surrounding area has been fluoridated since the 1960s. A few other places are also fluoridated including North Tyneside. There are plans to fluoridate all of England and the NHS is backing it.


There's also a lot of opposition. Our health authority aren't pushing it yet, but if they do, we will oppose it. We are even prepared to buy a special unit that takes fluoride out at the mains. Its pretty expensive, but if they do start talking about fluoridating our water, I am going to send the water authority details of it, and tell them that if they fluoridate I will install it and knock the cost off the water bill. devilred.gif

Problem is, if anyone has problems excreting it, then the more people drink or the more they bath in it, the bigger the "dose" of fluoride medication. If they then brush their teeth a couple of times a day with a fluoride toothpaste............ hypno.gif I'm not 100 % sure if fluoride in toothpaste damaged my sons thirst sense, or if a poor thirst sense (and therefore low urine output) caused fluoride to accumulate, or just he took in more than he could excrete, but for us fluoride was bad news, and removing it has made a huge difference to my son's quality of life.

#6 Canopus

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 06:04 PM

QUOTE
There's also a lot of opposition. Our health authority aren't pushing it yet, but if they do, we will oppose it. We are even prepared to buy a special unit that takes fluoride out at the mains. Its pretty expensive, but if they do start talking about fluoridating our water, I am going to send the water authority details of it, and tell them that if they fluoridate I will install it and knock the cost off the water bill.


Water companies are private businesses. Health authorities officially have no powers outside of the NHS and are incapable of passing any legislation dictating what private companies can and can't do. Only parliament has the power to dictate that water companies fluoridate.

Domestic water filters can't remove fluoride. Only complicated expensive processes such as reverse osmosis or distillation are capable of removing fluoride. What I am interested in knowing is what happens to 99.9% of the fluoride in the water that isn't consumed. It is being released into the environment as sewage works don't remove it.

#7 sue1957

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 06:22 PM

QUOTE (Canopus @ Jul 3 2006, 07:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Water companies are private businesses. Health authorities officially have no powers outside of the NHS and are incapable of passing any legislation dictating what private companies can and can't do. Only parliament has the power to dictate that water companies fluoridate.

Domestic water filters can't remove fluoride. Only complicated expensive processes such as reverse osmosis or distillation are capable of removing fluoride. What I am interested in knowing is what happens to 99.9% of the fluoride in the water that isn't consumed. It is being released into the environment as sewage works don't remove it.


Last I heard (which was ages ago so I'm not stating it as fact) was that our water authority will fluoridate if the health authority requests it, after consultation etc etc. My FIL wrote to the local water board 3 or 4 years ago and that was their response then I think, but it may be a bit different now. He registered an objection to any future plans, on health grounds, and asked to be told if they were ever even considering it. Not holding my breath they would get in touch laughing.gif

We'll go for the complicated expensive processes of removing it from our water supply when or if we need to, even if it means upping the mortgage. blink.gif As for the pollution aspect, I think that if the whole country becomes fluoridated, it could become a major problem. I think a lot of the US is fluoridated, so I don't buy certain US products (even organic) if I can avoid it.

#8 Canopus

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 12:11 PM

QUOTE
Last I heard (which was ages ago so I'm not stating it as fact) was that our water authority will fluoridate if the health authority requests it, after consultation etc etc. My FIL wrote to the local water board 3 or 4 years ago and that was their response then I think, but it may be a bit different now. He registered an objection to any future plans, on health grounds, and asked to be told if they were ever even considering it. Not holding my breath they would get in touch


I have found out that in 2003 an act was passed by parliament that allowed health authorities to force water companies to fluoridate. Some consultations have to be performed before the health authority is given the go ahead to dictate, but I am not sure what these consultations are and who is consulted.

QUOTE
We'll go for the complicated expensive processes of removing it from our water supply when or if we need to, even if it means upping the mortgage.


Reverse osmosis - drip drip drip. I'm not sure how much the membanes cost and how long they last.

Electric or gas powered distillers - The running cost will make your current energy bills seem small in comparison.

Solar powered distillers - Cheap to run but only work when the sun is shining.

QUOTE
As for the pollution aspect, I think that if the whole country becomes fluoridated, it could become a major problem. I think a lot of the US is fluoridated, so I don't buy certain US products (even organic) if I can avoid it.


About half of the US is fluoridated. Some Americans have even tried suing water companies for not fluoridating when their kid needs a filling.

#9 Kittykat

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 07:23 PM

My dentist told me to use a floride toothpaste, not to brush to hard. Also not to rinse out any toothpaste for atleast half an hour after brushing, this includes drinking and eating. However the first few times I tried this I hated it as the toothpaste tasted discusting, but it strengthens teeth alot so it may help.

#10 smallworld

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 12:23 AM

my dentist suggested sensodyne ( have a crack in front tooth after tripping over a lopped off bollard in the middle of the pavement !)
he also suggested that I smear this toothpaste over the sensitive tooth before going out in the cold, this has really helped, I suppose it's abit like not rinsing out your mouth, but with small children I would worry about leaving all that flouride sloshing around unsure.gif

wac

#11 Frangipani

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 10:52 PM

QUOTE (Stephanie @ Jun 28 2006, 02:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My 5 year old is suffering from sensitive teeth, the Dentist had a look and said there were no cavities but obviously the enamel had worn thin on a few places and every time he had something sugary or sweet, they hurt him.

He brushes them twice a day but he does eat a lot of rubbish due to his limited diet. Always has reduced sugar drinks etc. and water at school and at night.

The dentist gave him a fluoride mouthwash but it isn't helping. He just uses normal milk teeth toothpaste and then uses the mouthwash ... Aquafresh Mouthwhoosh I think it is called.

I heard about fissure sealants but my Dentist didn't mention them, even though I just checked his website and they do them there, but it says between the ages of 6-11.

Anyone had similar, used any particular products that helped??

The only saving grace is that he isn't eating sweets anymore! Bless him, he is in agony with them.



My dentist recommends Sensodyne for this, it build up the minerals in the teeth making them stronger and healthier, and no more pain.

Toothpastes with whitening agents are really the culprit, people use them everyday and their is a higher incidence of pain.

Sensodyne have a nice mint one that little ones wont find to strong.

smile.gif

#12 Stephanie

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 08:59 AM

Just going back to this, my sons sensitivity seems to have lessened since he has lost two of his milk teeth. I wonder if they were just sensitive all over because of the changes.

For the record, my Dentist said a big NOWAY to Sensodyne, apparently it should not under any circumstances be used on milk teeth. Just flouride mouthwashes, but not toothpastes.

I am waiting for a referral to the special needs dentist for a second opinion.

The best thing that has come of it, is that my son is now not eating sweets and is following a healthier diet.




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