Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Kris

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
Stephanie

Trying new foods ...

Recommended Posts

I have posted about this before.

 

I have a five year old who just eats rubbish, he is reluctant (putting it very mildly) to try any new foods.

He always says he hates things without even trying them ... unless they are sweet, he will ALWAYS try sweet things. He doesn't eat sweets or chocolates themselves ... but he will have biscuits etc for snacks.

 

His evening meals at the moment alternate between breadsticks and dairylea, chips with bread and butter (has to be cut into triangles!), or crackers and dairylea, sometimes toast but only with a sweet topping. I feel terrible about that.

 

He will have some fruit on rare occasions, no meat (except McD chicken nuggets), no vegetables, doesn't eat hard cheese, beans, etc.

 

We had him checked by the nutrition team, and he isn't lacking in any food groups. He is doing ok on that front, they told us not to force him to try things and leave him be.

 

It just gets so difficult when visiting relatives, Christmas dinner at school, eating at friends houses, when we go to a restaurant etc, I am always taking sandwiches for him everywhere we go.

 

A lot of you have said before that your kids were like this but they have grown out of it. What kind of age does this happen and how do you get them to change??

 

We have tried everything, sometimes he will try things if there is social pressure to ... he might say he even likes it, but when you offer it again he will say he didn't like it.

 

Any comments or recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My rule has always been that T tries a taste of things, but if he doesn't like it, that is OK. I also told him that he shoudl try things he doesn't like again at a later time, cos people's tastes change, and he might find he likes it then.

 

Somewhere I heard that it can take more than ten times of tasting a food for the child to get used to it.

 

They can always surprise you though. My ex insists T has a few vegetables when he has dinner at his house. He eats them, but it has not made him like them, and he never eats veg at home. When he was at his residential school, he started to eat a particular type of lettuce, and he recently ate macaroni cheese at his new housebase!

 

Things that helped were indoor "picnics" with lots of bits and pieces cut up into bite size pieces (so everyone can help themselves), things like chocolate fondue (where you can dip in fruit/ biscuits, marshmallows) and cooking things himself. He once made a sort of stir fry at school. He asked for some gravy to go with it - but he did eat it!

 

Karen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oxgirl   

My lad has always had severe food phobias, but it does get easier as they get older. Even now my son's diet is very restricted compared to other kids, but for him he has come an awfully long way. It has taken a long time and a lot of patience, but new foods can be accepted. He usually has a certain time period when he is more open to trying new things, when he is at his least stressed, then these windows of opportunity close off and he won't progress for a very long time, but as long as he doesn't reject food he has previously added to his 'list' then we continue to move forward, albeit very slowly.

 

During his last window of openness, what I would do is, as we were eating our food, I'd just very calmly and quietly cut a tiny piece of what I was eating and put it on a side plate for him. I wouldn't say anything or make any comment. One day I placed a tiny morsal of pasta on the plate and he ate it and liked it, so a few minutes later I'd put another bit on and he ate that as well. He ended up eating half of my dinner for me! :D A few days later, in addition to his normal meal, I gave him a spoonful of pasta on a separate dish. A few days later, I increased the portion to two spoons and just left it next to his usual meal for him to eat or not. After a few weeks I took a gamble and didn't give him his usual meal but gave him his very own portion of pasta instead and he enjoyed some of it, so this was a big success for us.

 

As I say, it can seem like it's taking forever, but things will get added to your son's list gradually.

Keep on keeping on. >:D<<'> :D

 

~ Mel ~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
loulou   

Hi,

 

Kai has a pretty restricted diet too (he is 8). He does however eat apples and bananas, so it has now become part of his bedtime "riutal" to have an apple and banana in a bowl.

 

He doesn't like to try anything new, but occasionally he will at school. He has now perfected the art of "pretending" to eat at school so he doesn't lose any points :lol: .

 

I have tried something similar to Mel. I put a small amount of something on a plate and leave it near him. I don't say anything and sometimes i leave the room. He will sometimes eat it, but i don't draw any attention to the fact. I then put a bit more of whatever he ate and build up like that. I sometimes put a selection of things on a tray (yogurt, biscuit, banana) and just leave it by him. I try not to make an issue of it, and that seems to work better for him.

 

Loulou xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jb1964   

Hi Stephanie,

 

My daughter ate a very limited diet up until she reached around 10-11yrs when suddenly she would try new things - she may not like them but she'll try lots of new things now and her diet is much more varied and increased quantities (she's 13 now).

 

When she was younger it was sandwiches, toast etc - 'finger' food - that she could control easily to ensure textures taste etc.

 

Take care, I'm sure it will get much much better when he gets older.

 

Jb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
darky   

my daughter is a mare with food. however, i use reverse pyschology on her :devil: i have found, if i want her to try something i forbid it. i dont make a fuss, i use the fact my son will try anything once, so i invite him to have some, but not her. its not long before shes coming to me asking to try it. :lol: ive got it off to a fine art now. shes trying more and more all the time.

the other thing i do, cruel mother i know, is forbid anything else until the meal has been eaten. she knows now, if she does not eat it, she will not get rewarded with things she loves.

the last thing i do and this works nearly everytime, is i put things in dishes on the table and tell the kids to help themselves. they are all so busy making sure they dont miss out on anything, they dont notice what they are eating. you know what kids are like, determined to out do each other. you really can work it to your favour!

a vital point in all this, is making sure that everyone sits at the table at the same time. if my kids were allowed to wonder free and get down when they felt like it, they would never eat. routine and boundries is key, and dont be afraid if they tantrum, kids do that AS or not!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JsMum   

J has issues with food related to sensory difficulties, so texture, tempreture, taste, ect,,,, he too has been a real sweet tooth, but we have been able to ballance it with the offers of really delicious milkshakes, like strawberry or banana milkshakes, he loves fruit, so grapes, ki wi, apples, pears, so we do have a fruit basket always avialable and if there isnt any chocolate buiscits showing he goes for the fruit, yogurts are another favoirate, and rice pudding, and breakfast stuff, so wheetabix ect,,,

 

J doesnt eat different foods on the same plate, but he is beginning to make progress with mash and chicken nuggets.

 

Small changes are best introducing small amounts into the home.

 

I also have increased the liquid variety also into the fridge and costing me a bomb as J loves it, the the innocent range, full of goodness and fruit.

 

J still has his sweeter variety but its been halved over the last year and we are seeing an improvment in his taste of other foods.

 

J loves steak, and he loves all the meat from the deli, he chooses it, and helps with the making sandwhiches.

 

If your son has a sweet tooth, it may be he needs weening off gradually, and not to make a big deal that the sweets he is eating now are bad, because in small quantaties they are very rewarding.

 

What we had to do for the dietition is make a food diary and that gave us the evidence where and when the sweet tooth came more noticable.

 

I dont have any rules as such with food but J does have to have his main meals before his sweets/fruit and drinks as sometimes he was drinking to fill himself and then not having room for a main meal.

 

We have also had to cut out Cheese altogether and othe products that J is allergic to.

 

Having a daily menu displayed may help and stickers for attempts of eating food.

 

Sitting together and making a weekly menu as well so he has a more concreate idea of what he is going to be having for tea, with pudding if he tries his tea meal.

 

J also has supper every evening and nothing too sweet, its normally cereal or toast.

 

 

JsMum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's so often the same things, yeah my sons faves are those two - choc sandwiches (in his Friday lunch box only now - I restricted him) and cereal, he eats lots of that!

 

Everything he does try he seems not to like.

 

Christmas dinner will be strawberry jam on toast for him .. and its at my sisters house so I will feel terrible about it.

 

However from the other comments I can see that he will grow out of this eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oxgirl   
Christmas dinner will be strawberry jam on toast for him .. and its at my sisters house so I will feel terrible about it.

 

Yes, I can remember well how it felt to be sitting down to a big Xmas lunch with all the in-laws and aunts and cousins with my lad sitting in the other room with two bits of toast! :(

Last year school made a big fuss about him joining in with the other kids for a slap up Xmas lunch and they didn't get that it just wasn't a treat for him, he'd rather have his sandwiches, which he did! :P

 

~ Mel ~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bagpuss   

My youngest dd's Xmas dinner this year will be bread and butter, a fromage frais and some crisps.... :ph34r: May be able to sneak a banana in if I'm lucky... :wacko:

 

She has a very restricted diet, consisting mainly of bread, marmite, butter, crisps, fromage frais, milk, water, fresh orange juice, chocolate, chips, apples, bananas and pickled onions. :unsure:

 

Gave up a long time ago trying to get her to even taste anything different, and one by one, foods have been discarded. The paediatrician told us to relax alittle about it, she was healthy, a good weight, and we are hoping if we don't make too big a deal of it then she may try what we eat as she gets older.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
flipper   

Finally got around to visiting the GP following C's results from Sunderland saying a GF diet was likely to be beneficial. We've been following the diet rigidly, but it's a bit expensive.

 

Our usual GP, who specialises in paediatric meds has left the practice and we haven't met his replacement yet, so it was a bit nerve-wracking.

However, I was delighted to find that our new GP was off today, and the locum was... our old GP!

 

He listened to what I had to say and has kindly prescribed rolls, bread, pizza bases and pasta for six months, and then to be reviewed. And he'll also refer us to a dietician.

 

For those who've been down this route - is this about right? As far as I can tell, we're entitled to 1 pack of per month, which isn't really much I suppose, but it's a start.

 

But in a world where everyone seems to have to fight for everything, this seemed like a huge victory...

 

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

flipper you are one of the lucky ones my GP said GF scipts are for patients dx with cealiacs only and was very snooty with me, I hope you find the diet works well, Im sure it has for my DS we have been doing it for nearly three and a half years now and are totally used to it. All the best,

 

perry chie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baddad   
flipper you are one of the lucky ones my GP said GF scipts are for patients dx with cealiacs only and was very snooty with me, I hope you find the diet works well, Im sure it has for my DS we have been doing it for nearly three and a half years now and are totally used to it. All the best,

 

perry chie

 

Hi Perry Chie -

It really is a lottery with GP's... the actual guidelines are 'open' enough to allow them to prescribe if there is a perceived benefit/need for a GF diet (as proven by Flipper's and my own cases, among many others)...

 

Flipper - it is initially expensive, but the more you get used to GF/DF shopping the more you realise you can go without some things rather than buying expensive GF/DF versions of them, and the better you get at adapting your usual recipes without 'special' ingredients. Or maybe I've just got so used to the additional expense I don't notice it any more! :lol::lol::lol: (all I can say really is Before and After GF the standard state of my bank balance has been 'skint' - so make of that what you will!). the bits you mention are for the most part it, but there are a few varieties of biscuits available too... If you check out the manufacturers websites you should find lists of what is available on scrip... The DS and glutafin/schar ones are about the most comprehensive ranges, i think.

 

Hope that's helpful

 

L&P

 

BD :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Baddad, long time no see! Im quite pleased GP said no in a way as I would prob be relying on made breads and the ones I have bought (rarely) have had a very bad effect on DS, I know what goes in his bread and there is no flour improvers or other yuckies and the bread I make is edible, esp when its just done yum!

Perhaps I will mention it again, can you get flour with the scripts?

 

perry chie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baddad   
Hello Baddad, long time no see! Im quite pleased GP said no in a way as I would prob be relying on made breads and the ones I have bought (rarely) have had a very bad effect on DS, I know what goes in his bread and there is no flour improvers or other yuckies and the bread I make is edible, esp when its just done yum!

Perhaps I will mention it again, can you get flour with the scripts?

 

perry chie

 

Well i've been about so shame on you! :shame::lol:

 

Flour - there are a couple of mixes available (Juvela, I think), but some of them had dairy in... I think there's one called 'Harvest mix' or something thats supposed to be OK for making a 'rustic' stylee loaf, but that's about it. You used to be able to get some made by trufree on scrip but they stopped doing them, and tbh they weren't all that being mainly soya based...

Generally the FF supermarket breads are improving dramatically at a pace... The texture of things like sub rolls and ciabatta is miles better than it was, and the after taste you used to get with soya is much less apparent. I think most of them now use farina (potato flour) and tapioca as the basis instead of rice and soya, and - lets face it - it's such a moneyspinner for the supermarkets now thanks to 'detox diets' and Gillian McGordaintshefuggly that they're doing everything to get it right...

TBH i haven't had the breadmaker out in over a year - the DS scrip breads and Antionette S rolls I get from the supermarket keep Ben happy enough :)

Actually, I ought to have a garage sale: got a breadmaker, food processor and ice-cream maker I hardly ever use now!

 

L&P

 

BD :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sesley   
My youngest dd's Xmas dinner this year will be bread and butter, a fromage frais and some crisps.... :ph34r: May be able to sneak a banana in if I'm lucky... :wacko:

 

She has a very restricted diet, consisting mainly of bread, marmite, butter, crisps, fromage frais, milk, water, fresh orange juice, chocolate, chips, apples, bananas and pickled onions. :unsure:

 

Gave up a long time ago trying to get her to even taste anything different, and one by one, foods have been discarded. The paediatrician told us to relax alittle about it, she was healthy, a good weight, and we are hoping if we don't make too big a deal of it then she may try what we eat as she gets older.

 

 

 

I am glad it isn,t just me then, when i tell people,what he likes to eat,and will only eat, i worry about what they think for a while,but there isn,t a lot i can do,i have had food fights with him and we all end up upset and nothing achieved,so i end up just going along with him,and try to suggest,he tries something new,without much success. His diet consists of Farleys Rusks for breakfast,(they are just a �1 in Tesco,s just now :rolleyes: then he has dry chocolate shreddies washed down with a glass of milk(can,t mix the two)he eats toast, yoplait yoguts in plenty, potatoe waffles, and dinner has to be coloured red either mince or chicken,so its a basic bolognaise sauce with hidden veggies,with pasta or rice, or he likes sweet and sour chicken with some chilli in it, i can get away with red coloured beef cassarole. I would love to see him tuck into a burger and pizza one day. He has a lean body,and he,s healthy,he gets very few colds and stomach complaints.oh he eats chocolate without any problems :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lynden   

I thought I had given up worrying till I had to start doing packed lunches for Logan and they are so full of ######! Well not ###### - but nothing that resembles real food. He'll eat cereals or cereal bars (some of them), dry toast, crisps, grapes and apples, chocolate in abundance if he could, some biscuits - its a nightmare!

 

We're actually finding too that he'll eat fish fingers in school on a friday along with beans but wont even look at them at home!!

 

He is only 4 and finally at an acceptable weight so I'm hoping as he gets older he'll try more foods - I only stress now when he's losing weight because he was so very thin for so long (still thin now but at least he's on the centiles!)

 

Lynne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lynne

Food is still an issue in our house, for the 7 years my son was in primary school he ate the same items for his lunch every day, he can now tell me that when i put something different in his lunch box I had ruined his whole lunch and he could not eat any of it. The school understood his eating habits and if he showed an interest in anything that was on the dinner menu they brought him a small portion to see if he would taste it. They continued doing this throughout the primary years yet if I tried this at home he couldn't taste it. This Sept he changed schools, first week I sent the usual lunch and he brought it home again. Started to question what was wrong his answer was "The dinners are really good I don't need a lunch anymore," I cried never could i visualize him sitting down to school dinners and enjoying them. Spoke to the school who had already told the dinner staff to assist in any way they could. Unfortunately he is still not a great eater and has his own tastes, but we are slowly moving forward.

I would speak to the school and ask them to support him, make it clear that he is never to be forced to eat, he has to want too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
farfalla   

Hi,

i know what you are going through, N won't eat many things,

chips, chicken/sausage/bacon for tea dinner,,,, everyday!

If he takes pack lunch to school, he has marmite sandies(which are ok),

crisps, and a drink, no good putting fruit in, because if it isnt cold,

he wont even touch it, the same with snack bars, unless they are out of the fridge

wont go near. Tried a cool bag, but he knows they have been out of the fridge and

wont entertain the idea!

He won't eat school dinner, but will have brunch at 11.30,

so at least he is eating something! allbeit sausage and bacon

 

He won't touch veg, and god i have tried.....

he did say he would try pizza when he was 12.... i think, he thinks i would of forgotten by then!

 

I suppose its down to the individual child, N is 11 now,

and eats less every month.....

 

Sorry I can't offer advice, apart from stay calm

and maybe asking if they would like to try it,,,, i

don't have a clue :unsure:

Edited by farfalla

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My DS is really god with food, the only problem i have is having other kids round to tea as i never know what to cook them as most of them will only eat junk and my DS eats what we do and loves his veggies, i always end up asking freinds what there kids eat so that i know what sort of food to get in ready. Mrs F x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jb1964   
A lot of you have said before that your kids were like this but they have grown out of it. What kind of age does this happen and how do you get them to change??

 

Hi Stephanie,

 

We had the same worries with our daughter although probably by the time she was around 7 or 8 I'd stopped being as anxious as I was. The Paed. constantly told us not to pressurise her and she would eventually come round (although we didn't know she had ASD then) - she saw the nutritionist/dietician every couple of months but it never made any difference as my daughter knew what foods were healthy and what wasn't - it was just the fact that she couldn't eat them or wouldn't try - because she'd either feel sick or be sick - can't recall how many times she actually retched or was sick after attempting different foods.

 

She also actually didn't have a 'really bad diet' - when she was very young she ate cold lean meats (i.e. turkey/chicken or ham) cheese, boiled eggs with dippers, toast, lean bacon, bread, chocolate (only maltesers or freddo frogs) dry cereal (like rice crispies), banana's and drank milk or still water. As she got older she did eat fishfingers, at one time only the breadcrumbs, and then moved onto only the fish and then pizza.

 

She got to around 11-12yrs old when suddenly she started trying different foods and about a year ago she started eating proper roast chicken sliced in gravy with a carrot and a tiny potato (we were so amazed!!!) - to be honest even now she has does tends to stick to the same food for a good few months and then change to something different and stick to that for ages.

 

Although she still won't eat chips, or sweets, or cake, and you would never get ice cream near her, and a biscuit would only be plain (like digestives). She also could never eat tomato ketchup or any other dip with foods as she recently explained to me how can I dip something hot into something cold!!! She also wouldn't eat a pea or sweetcorn and remember her explaining to the CPN at one point about worrying that the skin would stick in her throat.

 

Take care,

Jb

Edited by jb1964

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
farfalla   

Had nana up to visit for a fortnight........ that its self was a challenge!

 

Started good...... DS helped her make buns,(green,purple and blue ones!)

and he even tried one..... albeit a small bite, but he tried it.....

 

Mum spent her evenings reading through (the now famous on here), aspergers book,

from cover to cover...... then on saturday before going home, made pasties(nice for us)..

 

HOWEVER...... she wanted DS to try a bit, and when he laughed and refused, she was

found struggling with him on the sofa,(I had been in the bath), trying to force a bit in his mouth!!!!

 

Now, yes I use to get upset with DS when i cooked something and he wouldnt try it, but that

was before I learnt why he wasnt trying things, and the different ways of getting him to try........

(and yes I feel bad for that),

I flipped out....... I know I shouldnt have, but she had read the whole damn book, and still

went about things like a nut!

 

I am proud of DS for trying buns,,,,,,,, but so angry at nana for her bullying ways.....

yes I remember having to sit at the table and having to eat ALL my dinner, even if i was there

for three hours!

 

Sorry, so much has happened in the last two weeks, with school and stuff

and I havent been able to come on and rant....... I am back to work on Monday

after having 5 weeks off! So I need to sort my head out........

 

God reading back that all seems jibberish! But its good to get it out of my head,

even if it reads worse than clingon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clare63   

Oh my goodness...was he trying to fight her off !!!

 

Think our parents do have difficulty getting their heads around all this and no matter how many books they read still tend to get it wrong and revert back to ways of how it was when they were little.

 

That will be a struggle getting back to work after 5 weeks, I hope you now feel ready to return.

 

Good to see you back on here.

 

take care Hun

 

Clare x x x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
farfalla   

Trying to fight her off isn't the term...........

 

kicking and screaming was, when i came in i thought they were playing

around, until i saw his face!

Love her to bits, but I could of hit her myself for being a twit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never really had to worry too much about C's diet (other than lack of it), so I'm not really up on all the dietary advice.

I have a child under my care at school who has unDX autism, he has permanent diahorrea (spelling!) and as far as I can tell looking through his files, the only thing that has been cut from his diet is chocolate - there is no mention of any trial of gluten-free or such like. Are there other alterations to children's diets that have proven to have been beneficial? His mum would try anything that may help.

Could someone give me a quick run-down of the dietary recommendations re gluten-free and it's proven benefits... and other stuff-free diets that have been proven to help people on the spectrum?

Any advice/knowledge would be much appreciated.... thanks.

(I'm up to my eyeballs in reviews at the moment, otherwise I'd try to research it myself)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baddad   

Hi crystaltips

 

My own son's probs went the other way - constipation/vomiting, but it can be either or...

A good starting point is getting a urine analysis done via Sunderland University - Paul shattock's team. This costs �60.00 now (I think) if done privately, but if you have a helpful/open minded GP it can be done by referral on NHS for nix... This'll show up any 'peaks' for intolerances with gluten (wheat etc) and casein (dairy) which informs what might be helpful. after that, it's just a long haul of trial and error... 3-6 mths dairy, 6-12 mths gluten. If you see benefits straight off, no worries and home and dry, but sometimes 'clearing' the system prolongs things so you have to give it a fair shot. no noticeable improvement after those time limits and you're probably flogging a dead 'un...

Quickie point re diahorrea...

Many parents misread whats going on and think it's diahorrea when in fact it's constipation... what happens is the kids get sooo bunged up that the OUTSIDE of the blockage 'weeps' ( :sick: sorry - not nice i know) and that leakage looks like the runs... In fact, the blockage stays intact despite daily 'seepage' and parents get through tons of nappies wondering where the hell does it all come from while the kids still in huige discomfort from carrying a solid brick around internally...

 

Hope that's helpful

 

L&P

 

BD :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karen A   

Hi Krystaltps.As Baddad said constipation could be the problem.There are also other causes of diahorrea that are not related to AS or intolerance.It would be a good idea for mum to make an appointment with the GP see if anything else is causing the problem if this has not been done already.Karen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Baddad - J has had constant constipation for 5 years but has "seepage". He also doesn't feel it coming. Regardles of bowel problems, I'd suggest eliminating all artificial colours, flavourings and sweetners such as aspartame. Also preservatives such as mono sodium glutamate (MSG) which are well documented to cause problems with attention, hyperactivity and can make ASD children more hyper etc.

 

J has had tests for allergies but all came back negative - but intolerances do not show up in blood tests, so again, the Sunderland University Autism Research groups urine analysis would be a good way to start.

 

It is true that some NHS doctors will fund the cost - but from my experience it would have been easier for me to just pay privately (I'm still waiting to hear from Surgery after chasing them up for 7 months!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks peeps. That's some good advice to go on. Obviously none of it is up to me, but I can pass the info onto mum (and the paed - who's not really "up" on these things) during the review.

I do genuinely think it is real diahorrea, as he passes lumps of solid with it (oohh, this post sure ain't for the squeemish) and he is as regular as clockwork). It is possible that tests have been carried out pre-school, and diets tested out (these wouldn't be in his files).

Thanks again >:D<<'>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is part of an email that we received at our local support Group - I have deleted the personal details, but the rest may be of interest to those whose children are on a dairy free diet and eat these biscuits

 

TRUFREE who have been taken over by Nutrionpoint are no longer going to regard dairy as an issue. Their custard creams now have milk in them and after speaking to the lady on customer services I got the impression that other products in their range may go the same way. She advised me to write to NUTRIONPOINT to explain. Also they seem unaware of this particular area of their market. Could you email the parents you are in contact with and ask them that if this affects them also could they write expressing their views.

 

Address given NUTRIONPOINT

FREEPOST RRLCUHSTGGYB

STATION PORT

442 STOCKPORT ROAD

WARRINGTON

WA4 2GW

 

If this info breaches forum rules , then Moderator please edit.

 

Thanks,

 

Michelle

 

Hi Michelle -

 

I have edited a couple of paragraphs above, but the content remains basically unchanged.

It would be nice, if you feel that your posts might breach forum rules, to ask before posting in future :shame: makes our lives much easier!

I should point out that Trufree's 'market' is in general terms as a supplier of products for coeliacs, and dairy isn't implicated in their diets. I think they probably do misunderstand the dietary considerations of kids on the spectrum who find gf/df diets helpful, but this is in real terms a very small part of their market. As you say, though, the more people who write them the more aware they will be.

I'm guessing your source for this info is KAT's e-mail system(?) ... I have replied to them, so you may have seen this already, but for the benefit of others:

About 18 months ago I had a conversation with someone at one of the manufacturers (can't remember if it was trufree/glutafin/ds, but one of them - probably DS!) about products not labelled dairy free but which did not list dairy in the ingredients. They told me that each 'certification' as allergen free costs them seperately, so as their main market concerns were gluten and nut allergy they didn't invest too heavily to get creditation outside of those areas. A bit vague, but I tend to read the ingredients and then look at the allergen lists (i.e. 'this product contains eggs and may contain traces of') as back up confirmation. It works for me, but my own son can cope with small amounts of dairy anyway...

 

In a nutshell (excuse pun) the costs of certification have to be offset by the business that certification generates...

 

Hope that's helpful

 

L&P

 

BD :D

Edited by baddad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tally   

Actually, lactose intolerance is apparently fairly common because of the damage caused to the gut by coeliac disease. Often it is possible to eat it again once the person has been off gluten long enough for the gut to repair itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tally   

Whilst the OLD packaging clearly says "Dairy Free," the ingredients include whole milk powder. Presumably this is a new recipe, and the new packaging has been changed to reflect this. It might be a good idea to stock up on the old product from a reputable store. If there is a recall, you would get a full refund.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tally   

The new packaging has a telltale "New Improved Recipe" label on it. Some products are no longer labelled as dairy free, even though they actually are.

 

Definitely worth sending a letter to express your disappointment that a product your child used to enjoy is no longer safe for him to eat.

 

Also worth contacting the customer service department of your usual shop (not in-store, they will have a special number, should be fairly easy to get hold of) about this as well. If enough people do this, they may seek an alternative product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayzee   

My 6 Year old son was diagnosed last year with HFA, at the time i found it very hard to believe and even his teacher told me to get a 2nd opinion. I have been lucky as he is very loveable,sociable etc but to the extreme. Lately ive been starting to notice certain behaviours escalating and his HFA more noticeable. He is constantly on the go,never stops,very hyper and seems not to be hearing me when i try to discipline him as he goes back and does it again. I apologize for my naivety but i need some advice on what i could give him to calm him down and what i should be doing with his diet which might help his concentration and behaviour. He is a beautiful boy and i count myself lucky but i just feel exhausted!!!!! ANY Advice would be greatly appreciated. THanks.

Edited by jayzee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayzee   
I found that eye q or equivalent helped my son...it doesn't help all children

Do you follow any particular diet, his speech etc is fine, just need to boost his concentration and calm him down. That may sound terrible as i said i class myself lucky but i just feel exhausted most of the time and dont really want to medicate him until really necessary. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
allie   

My son is on a dairy free diet which really helped with his hyperactivity. He also takes some herbal tablets - not sure if I'm allowed to put the link up so if you pm me I can send you the link - but I've seen a huge improvement in his anxiety, behaviour and concentration.

Allie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×