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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
hev

why choose free from?

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hev   

i keep seeing more and more free from food,sainsburys got 20% off all the range at mo,is it cos your children got allergies to wheat etc?is it to do with e numbers as well?thanks

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KarenT   

Usually allergy/intolerance related. Most are natural products so fewer e numbers. But take care, you should still read the labels and be aware of hidden nasties. MSG is often labelled as 'natural flavouring', and I've come across wheat/gluten free crackers of a reputable brand that contained hydrogenated vegetable fat. Buying free-from products doesn't necessarily mean they're still OK.

 

Karen

x

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In J's case it would be due to intolerences. He rarely has anything with artificial colourings/flavourings as it sends him sky high. I also try to cut out aspartame, which although it is a natural amino acid is known to cause problems. But my main issue is his bowel problem which could be gluten and lactose intolerence. J was intolerent to standard infant formula but was ok on soya formula. There is also the "leaky gut and brain membrane" theory, so even if there is no obvious bowel problem, a GF/CF diet could still improve co-ordination/ concentration etc.

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hev   

tescos have now put a whole new selection of free from food in their stores,i asked cashier and she said it started yesterday and is in stores nationwide

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Elaine   

Hi,

 

I've been doing GF/CF with my two sons for the best part of 5 years by now, but still can't produce nice tasting bread with the standard GF mixes. I was wondering about trying baking with gluten free wheat starch.

 

For anyone using the gluten and casein free diet. Have any of you tried using products made with gluten free wheat starch? And if so, were there any problems?

 

Thanks

Edited by Elaine

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baddad   

No, but I recently tried lactose free milk and after a couple of days the 'milk effect' kicked in again... :unsure:

 

The only way of knowing for sure, I guess, is to suck it and see, but I'd be dubious myself... Another point is that it's the 'claggy' gluten bit that holds wheat bread together, so if you take that OUT you've got exactly the same problems you have with the other gluten free flours(?)

 

We've sort of given up on bread recipes: we use the DS multigrain bread (on scrip) for toast, and Antionette Saville's rolls for packed lunches. There are some OK baguettes available on scrip for garlic bread and stuff, and those tend to do for us... When I did make my own bread I used the Dove's Farm mix, but somebody said the Juvela country mix makes a nice loaf (?) Not sure whether the latter was ALL gluten or just wheat gluten and/or dairy free though(?)

 

Hope that helps

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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anita81   

im gonna start flynn on a wheat and gluten free diet but i have no idea where to start.is there any thing i should look out for on food labels apart from the obvious?thanx

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flipper   
No, but I recently tried lactose free milk and after a couple of days the 'milk effect' kicked in again... :unsure:

 

I'm somewhat lactose intolerant myself, and when C had his problem with cow's milk I did a lot of research, and was surprised to find that lactose intolerance and milk allergy are so different (essentially lactose is a sugar and the allergy is to casein - a protein) - so it's no surprise that lactofree milk wouldn't be any help.

 

We've sort of given up on bread recipes: we use the DS multigrain bread (on scrip) for toast, and Antionette Saville's rolls for packed lunches. There are some OK baguettes available on scrip for garlic bread and stuff, and those tend to do for us... When I did make my own bread I used the Dove's Farm mix, but somebody said the Juvela country mix makes a nice loaf (?) Not sure whether the latter was ALL gluten or just wheat gluten and/or dairy free though(?)

 

Bread is a serious issue for us, we're already missing it badly! Good to hear about the DS Multigrain - will give that a try (have seen it in Tesco).

Where to you get the Antionette Saville products from?

 

flipper

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flipper   

Does anyone use Oat-based cereals on GF diets?

 

I know oats themselves don't contain gluten, but there is a considered risk of contamination.

 

I'm thinking of Rice Krispies Multi-grain which only contain an allergy warning of "contains oats" and appear to be GF/CF in all other respects.

 

I've heard a lot of comments about Rice Krispies also - but most I've seen use Barley Malt Extract. Are there any out there (other than Envirokids which my kids don't like) that are like "real" Rice Krispies without barley malt?

 

Thanks

flipper

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My Gluten, wheat and dairy free cookbook lists what to avoid, and what cereals are OK. It says to avoid oats, oatmeal and oatgerm (amongst many others). I think the coeliacs website has a lot of information, and I believe that some coeliacs can tolerate some oat gluten. But if an individual is completely gluten intolerant then oats and malt barley need to be completely elliminated, at least initially - I would guess you could try to introduce one thing at a time, such as cereals containind malt barley extract, which is a ver low amount - like in rice crispies.

Edited by MichelleW

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baddad   

Hi flipper -

 

Oats do contain gluten. I think maybe the confusion comes because some people have a specific 'wheat' allergy rather than a 'gluten' allergy... also wheat tends to be one of the targeted food groups in detox diets, so if you look at 'detox' recipes they may contain other grains that have their own glutens in (like oats, spelt, rye, barley etc).

Gor a gf/df diet you have to look for gluten free, not just wheat free.

 

As far as crispies go, even the ordinary ones are a 'no-go' area if you're looking at the major 'k' brand, as they contain malt. There are several varieties now available without malt in the 'freefrom' section, and my own son is ok with Tesco's own brand which contain malt extract, but i know this is not always the case, so if you're just starting the diet it's best to stick with completely malt free until you've completed the trial period.

 

Specific free from cereals ar probably the best place to start - my son likes 'Gorilla Munch' and 'Mesa Flakes' particularly...

 

Hope that helps

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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baddad   
Bread is a serious issue for us, we're already missing it badly! Good to hear about the DS Multigrain - will give that a try (have seen it in Tesco).

Where to you get the Antionette Saville products from?

 

flipper

 

My local Waitrose do the antionette saville rolls and a few other bits and bobs (found quite a nice FF sausage in there the other day!)

The big + with DS mulitigrain is its on scrip (if you've a helpful GP), but i tried tesco's own new 'multiseeded' freefrom the other day and ben really liked that as toast - also slightly bigger slices, and packed in a 'twin pack' so you only have to open half a loaf at a time...

Both Sainsbury/tesco's do their own brand FF muffins too - a quick 'ping' in the microwave for 20 seconds to refresh and they're another very nice option!

 

Thanks for the info re 'lactofree' milk - I knew the protein thing in the back of my head, but hadn't really thought it through! Now you've pointed it out - DOH!! :rolleyes:

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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baddad   

Hi all - just a heads up on a couple of new FF products at out local supermarket...

 

FF Ciabatta bread - ben's verdict 'Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm'. Surprisingly soft/fluffy like proper ciabatta, and i topped it with tomatoes/olives/cheese (zly) for him

And a new pizza base (the old ones had dairy in, the new version is dairy free too) which he rather liked. Both available at T****'s freefrom section but haven't had a chance to check out 'S********'s yet...

 

Also, I tried an old recipe for 'Evesham chicken' (chicken cooked with apples in cider & cream ) t'other day using a Soya version of single cream available in most supermarkets... worked a treat (as do peppered steaks, carbonnara etc, BTW) Cider, of course (except some of the really commercial brands) is naturally GF, and it makes a nice change from plain roast chicken or wine sauces etc...

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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Viper   

Baddad, do you know how that title reads to a dyslexic person, and how intrigued I was by free FORMS. I thought they were all free. :rolleyes:

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smiley   

(Viper - i've been reading 'fromage frais' :unsure::rolleyes: )

 

:whistle:

 

Bads - I've noticed loads of GF/CF sturff about recently - and not just a couple of shelves at the back, hiding behind the 'You can buy me if you want food poisioning' sale stuff either.

 

:thumbs:

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custard   

Hi

 

I wonder if anyone can help? I have a son nearly 4 who is ASD and the Sunderalnd urine analysis indicated gluten problems (casesin was OK).

 

Since then I have been trying him with substitute gluten free alternatives to the small range of food he will eat (gluten free bread, pasta, fish fingers, pancakes etc) but the only gluten free product he will eat is biscuits! As biscuits all day isn't a viable diet, I have totally stalled now. I have tried differnent ranges of products to see if that makes any difference and also some things he wouldn't normally eat just to see what happened.

 

Basically he refuses all gluten free foods I have tried except biscuits. Anybody else been there and cracked the problem ? I want to try the diet, but don't know what to do next.

 

TIA

 

xxx

custard

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Nic m   

Hi Custard, i am sure lots of people will be able to give you better advice than i can, but what i do know is that there are lots of ways to tweak recipes it all depends on what your son will eat my sister has coeliac and her diet is better than anyones i know. Its all about checking labels and finding food that he will eat. I know you will know this but i dont know recipes to give you.

You could try contacting coeliac association for recipes and ideas.

More and more places now have a wee gluten free sign on their menus now so it could be worth taking him out somewhere that caters for a g/f diet if he can cope with eating out.

Hope you get on ok,

Nicola

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flipper   
Hi

 

I wonder if anyone can help? I have a son nearly 4 who is ASD and the Sunderalnd urine analysis indicated gluten problems (casesin was OK).

 

Since then I have been trying him with substitute gluten free alternatives to the small range of food he will eat (gluten free bread, pasta, fish fingers, pancakes etc) but the only gluten free product he will eat is biscuits! As biscuits all day isn't a viable diet, I have totally stalled now. I have tried differnent ranges of products to see if that makes any difference and also some things he wouldn't normally eat just to see what happened.

 

Basically he refuses all gluten free foods I have tried except biscuits. Anybody else been there and cracked the problem ? I want to try the diet, but don't know what to do next.

 

TIA

 

xxx

custard

 

I can certainly understand - most of the foods C liked (such as chicken nuggets) he won't touch the equivalent gluten-free version (and it's always worth trying them yourself - sometimes you'll really understand why he won't eat them!).

However, we viewed it as simply a case of no other option. So for a while he did live on rubbish!

 

We tried using things that don't have an equivalent - such as Rice cakes and corn cakes (which are naturally GF -but watch out for the flavoured versions which aren't!). Having got used to those (and now he loves rice cakes , or "rice burgers" as he calls them) we just try all sorts of different things. If he's hungry enough he'll nibble one or two gf nuggets, but as yet is still refusing gf fish fingers!

 

With pasta we found that he didn't like corn pasta (it looks wrong - too yellow) but does like maize pasta, just be sure to rinse it thoroughly after cooking, and make sure you don't over-cook as it goes soft and mushy quite quickly. We usually throw some pasta sauce on top and he'll much away happily.

 

Bread is difficult as it looks and tastes different, but again after a few weeks he started trying it. It's not a favourite, but he will eat it. GF pittas taste normal, if he likes those; gf pikelets are like small crumpets and always go down well. There are even gf jam doughnuts now...

 

I think the best advice is simply patience and perseverance. If you consider that at first he may be craving gluten, then you have to wait for that craving to fade (the withdrawal phase, if you like), and you need to remember that you might see some real changes (we've noticed a very real improvement in speach and imaginitive play - it's not perfect by any means, and it may be coincidental, but we're sticking with it).

 

There is now a pretty good gf range at both major supermarkets, but never forget that ordinary, home-cooked food is usually gf anyway! Does he like mashed potato, or chips? (Check oven-chips carefully though, they're not always gf). What about fruit? C loves apples and cherries, for example.

 

Really - stick with it. It seems hard but soon becomes second-nature, and in our experience he will start to give in little-by-little. And don't fret if he seems to be eating only biscuits at the moment (though you may want to consider vitamin supplements in the short term, just to be safe!).

 

Have you seen your GP? If you get a sympathetic one, he may prescribe some gf products - and so far C seems to like the gf rolls - and also refer you to a nutritionist.

 

Hope that helps, will be glad to share any more tips/concerns.

 

Phil

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Tally   

My doctor thinks I may have coeliac disease. He wants me to have a blood test and an endoscope. I think I must have looked scared because we eventually agreed I would just try avoiding gluten and see what happens. If I decide to have the tests, I have to start eating it again. I am too stingy to throw food away, so it's going to be a gradual process.

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Tally   

I didn't realise things were that bad until I had to fill in this great big questionnaire about my bowel movements. Seeing it written down made it sound really bad, but I always just thought it was normal. It's not a topic of conversation that comes up very often if you know what I mean, although I did have a vague notion that normal people do not spend half their lives on the toilet.

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Guest Lya of the Nox   
Guest Lya of the Nox

i gave up wheat for a while cos of endometriosis and it helped the endo lots of other things

there are loads more things you can convert nowadays tho Ohhh i sound old!!!

 

give it a try hun and keep a diary of how you are feeling ect

good luck

xx

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Tally   
keep a diary of how you are feeling ect

That's a good idea. My GP suggested that too. He said it would make it more of a scientific experiment.

 

I have tried a couple of things cos I kind of knew this was coming. I tried some rolls, but they just disintegrated. First time I tried them I dipped them in soup. I ended up with bread soup :lol: I found an OKish bread though. Pittas smell a bit odd, but they taste just like ordinary ones once toasted. Only I can't find where they hide the toaster at work.

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flipper   
That's a good idea. My GP suggested that too. He said it would make it more of a scientific experiment.

 

I have tried a couple of things cos I kind of knew this was coming. I tried some rolls, but they just disintegrated. First time I tried them I dipped them in soup. I ended up with bread soup :lol: I found an OKish bread though. Pittas smell a bit odd, but they taste just like ordinary ones once toasted. Only I can't find where they hide the toaster at work.

 

There are plenty of gluten-free pastas out there - corn pasta and maize pasta spring to mind.

Corn pasta is very yellow, but maize pasta is very similar - just be careful not to cook it for too long as it goes soft very quickly.

 

It's really not so bad once you get into the habit of checking *everything*! (Apart from the extra cost...)

 

Phil

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Tally   

Yeah, but they don't taste the same. I think there are some things you have to accept are wheat products and simply do not work. Unless you happen to like corn/rice/millet/whatever pasta!

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flipper   
Yeah, but they don't taste the same. I think there are some things you have to accept are wheat products and simply do not work. Unless you happen to like corn/rice/millet/whatever pasta!

 

No, really, maize pasta is very similar - I'd be surprised if you noticed the difference, especially if you put any sort of sauce on it.

(My 2 older girls don't need GF, and will refuse most GF things, even if they are not told, but maize pasta passes the "didn't realise" test!)

 

Corn/rice pasta are very different, I admit.

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jim   

I had the usual stomach pains and trips to the toilet. Then my 73 year old mum was diagnosed with celiac, so I thought I would try the diet and see if it cured my stomach ache.

 

What I did was try a 100% sure diet. That means I rejected any food I wasnt sure of. I read the labels on everything and rejected things with "starch" in them that wasnt clearer marked (like potato or wheat starch)

 

As first it was hard to find anything, and my stomach was a bit bubbly about the change, but after two weeks I felt better and the pain had gone away.

 

I dont eat much bread now or pasta. Instead I eat potatoes and rice and rice noodles. You can pay a lot of money for Celiace food, but potatoes and rice are cheap. I go to a chinese shop to get rice noodles (that take 5 mines to cook but you have to wash them for five mins)

I also buy chicken adn turkey breat (raw) and fry it. I buy mixed vegetables, I buy bagy of frozen fish that I fry with onions and chopped up bacon! I have become a bit of a cook. The only things that have disaapeared from ym life have been processed food. I can eat as much fresh vegetables, salat and white meat as I want. Eating it is heaven, cooking it is the bind !!

 

I also make my own breakfast musli from buckwheat flakes, sunflowers seeds, raisins, apple, millet flakes and dextrose. I have also noticed I am a bit intolerant to milk so I buy Lactose free milk. I hate the soya milk perosnally.

 

I also bought a bread making machine. The Celiac bread is really crumbly and dry. It tastes besrt if you toast it !! The bread machine bread is okay for the first day, but then tastes like the rest. I do buy ready made Celiace bread for emergencies.

I find the biggest problem is when I go out for the day because I am not sure If I will find something to eat. So I usually have to oplan ahead and take a few sandwiches. I have found a chinese restauarnt where the cook knows about "gluten", and usually,any good restaurant will have a knowledgeable Cook.

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jim   

I have a bread making machine, and made some reasonable good gluten free loaves. I have just found an old recipe:

 

500g flour (gluten free)

400 cl water

100 cl milk

1 ts salt

1 tsb sugar

yeast

2 tsb Olive oil

 

I canr reproduce "real" bread but some celiac loaves are less crumbly than others !! And it always tastes better toasted !!!

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jim   

I use "buckwheat" flakes which is repalcement musli or porridge. There are gluten free cornflakes on the market but the are expensive. The real cornflakes and sometimes classified as gluten free and sometimes not !

 

Several grains and starch sources are considered acceptable for a gluten-free diet. The most frequently used are maize (corn), potatoes, rice, and tapioca (derived from cassava). Other grains and starch sources generally considered suitable for gluten-free diets include amaranth, arrowroot, millet, montina, lupine, quinoa, sorghum (jowar), sweet potato, taro, teff, and yam. Various types of bean, soybean, and nut flours are sometimes used in gluten-free products to add protein and dietary fiber. In spite of its name, buckwheat is not related to wheat; pure buckwheat is considered acceptable for a gluten-free diet, although many commercial buckwheat products are actually mixtures of wheat and buckwheat flours, and thus not acceptable.

 

this is from Wikipedia about what grains you can eat.

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Tally   

My doctor told me to avoid milk for now as well. He said that many people with coeliac disease develop a lactose intolerance, but after 6 months off gluten it's often possible to reintroduce dairy. Or it could be that dairy is causing the symptoms. Without having the coeliac test it's impossible to be sure. I've found a soya milk that is OK. I had tried some before and hated it. I think my mistake was expecting it to taste like milk, but if you just try it as a completely new product, it's actually OK (well, I think so anyway). I rarely drink milk on its own anyway, normally just in something or with chocolate powder!

 

I have rice noodles that you put in a pan of boiling water and after about a minute they are soft and ready to eat. You don't even have to turn on the heat under the pan. I've always eaten them in stir fries, but I am eating them more often these days.

 

I made some bread from a mix I bought in the shop and it's quite nice. I put it in the freezer the day I made it and it's OK for sandwiches, tastes nice and fresh. I'm thinking about buying a bread machine but I don't want to spend that much money until I know I am going to make a lot of use of it.

 

I also made a cake. It didn't rise very well. I don't know if I didn't put in enough baking powder or if it's just a feature of GF flour. Either way, it tasted good, and that's all I care about!

 

I'm finding main meals are fairly easy. It's taking a packed lunch to work that is difficult, but I am managing. I eat GF toast for breakfast, that's quite nice.

 

My mum thinks I cannot eat anything nice now, so everything I make I am bagging her up a small portion in the freezer. So far I have a slice of bread, 2 slices of cake and a mini portion of spaghetti bolognese. I will take it all to her in a few weeks' time and prove I can eat nice things.

 

My guts haven't been very happy about it, but today is the first day it seems to be improving.

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jim   

Your stomach will settle down after a while. I acutally put on weight !!! But after a year it has evened out.

 

I think what I eat is now very healthy (no pizzas or kebabs or macdonalds) but vegetables, salad, white meat, all fresh and no prepacked !

Dinner times are the worst. Im off now to two health shoips to get bread for dinner time next week, and to get stuff for my homemade musli.

I bought a freezer too, because buy a lot and store it so I always have something, and never go hungry. A normal person can just pop out to the chinese etc, but we cant.

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Guest Lya of the Nox   
Guest Lya of the Nox

well done tally :notworthy:

it takes time for the tum to settle down after a change

mind and keep the fluids up

but go u

i am impressed

x

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baddad   

Hi tally - :)

 

If you're doing this on doctors orders you should be able to get lots of the stuff on scrip, which would mean you could try different manufacturers and types of (i.e.) bread, pasta, biscuits, rolls and stuff to find the ones you do like...

I'm with flipper on pasta - as long as it has sauce on you'd be hard pushed to know the difference... go for spirals, though as they tend to have the closest texture and not break up...

Breadmaker - I'd talk to your doc about scrip breads first. I never use mine anymore as Ben's perfectly happy with scrip breads (but for TOAST - no good for sarnies...) and baguettes (hmmm garlic bread!), and we also supplement that with Ciabatta bread & Garlic naans from FF ranges and Antionette Saville white rolls. (incidentally, bought one of her loaves the other week when they hadn't got rolls and then forgot it and it went past it's sellby. Used it to make a bread and butter pudding and YUM bl00dy yum!). With rolls, 'ping' them in the microwave in the morning to freshen, make up your packed lunch and they are still ok at midday... don't push it beyond that, though, or they revert to their pre-refresh 'lumpen' state!

 

Nowt to do with gluten, but for those who are DF too we discovered that our local Tesco's are now stocking Tofunni(?) ice-cream alongside the Swedish Glace... ben had a peach melba version (or something) today and it was very nice... very light/refreshing. saw a chocolate too, which he will try next time :)

 

Oh - Glutern free - another thing you should do is e-mail all the manufacturers and explain you've just been put on the diet for medical reasons and they'll send you sample parcels. Another very good way of sussing out who does what and what ones you prefer...

 

 

L&P

 

 

BD :D

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Tally   

I don't think I'd be able to get anything on prescription because I'm refusing the diagnostic tests. I didn't think to ask. But I have to pay for them anyway so it would probably work out cheaper to just buy it.

 

I have got some free samples coming though :)

 

At least I can still drink Coke :D

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Guest Lya of the Nox   
Guest Lya of the Nox
At least I can still drink Coke :D

 

water is waaaaaaay better

and this is coming form the queen of coke ( everytime i have some i a sooking the life outa my sorry bones lol) and choccy

 

try and up u water intake, to help the body adjust

 

 

but still GO Tally

 

 

xxx

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custard   

Hi there

 

As you were kind enough to give me advice I though I'd post an update on how we are doing with my sons gluten free diet.

 

Basically I persevered with finding enough things he would eat, made up a menu, bought a breadmaker and a couple of books and as of last week he is gluten free! His diet is very restricted so I give him omega oils and a vitamin and mineral supplement. He goes to Nursery 3 days a week and I have got them on board and am supplying 90% of his food for them.

 

The best breakthrough has been buying a breadmaker, not only cause I love it for our ordinary loaves, but it has allowed me to experiment a bit, which I would never have got the energy to do if I had to make them by hand. So I have tried various bread mixes, GF bread flour and yesterday received my internet order of various GF flours to make my own mix (from a book) and see how that goes. Today I tried the mixing in a banana idea and its turned out not too bad - it needed be cooked longer tho.

 

I also asked the GP about getting anything on prescription and he seems generally open to the idea, which would be welcome as all this is costing a bomb - but I suppose that partially what the DLA money is for!

 

Anyway, just need to see now whether it helps. I'm not pinning too much hope on it, but it worth a try for a year to see what happens.

 

So thanks folks, we have got there (just about) I just have to crack to holy grail of a bread he will eat without Nutella etc on it and one other alternative main meal (at the moment GF fishfingers, potato waffle and beans is it) and it will be as varied as his diet ever was before - ie not very 8-) and I will be satisfied.

 

So thanks again.

x

custard

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flipper   

Congratulations on going for it!

 

Honestly, it seems hard at first but it quickly becomes second nature.

Although C is only 4 and doesn't understand the "why", he does now accept that when we say "You can't have that, it has gluten" it's non-negotiable.

 

We have some food on prescription for a 6 month trial period - bread, rolls, pasta and pizza bases. It certainly helps.

 

C's diet is still quite restrictive, and he often just doesn't seem bothered about eating (although, obviously, sweets and crisps are always accepted!). But we did notice a change in him quite quickly - perhaps coincidental, but his speech has improved enormously, and his eye-contact (at least with us) is also better.

 

Best of luck with this.

 

Phil

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Tally   

As I was so reluctant to have the coeliac test, my doctor recommended the Sunderland test. He says the GFCF diet is thought to be helpful in ME as well as ASD, so it could help me on 2 fronts.

 

I was waiting for my pot to arrive in the post before I properly started excluding things - I was just trying a few things until then. But I have now been completely gluten free for 2 weeks, and eating only small amounts of dairy, even though I don't have the results yet.

 

At first my stomach was not very happy about it, but it settled down again. I don't know if that's to do with excluding gluten, or simply the new foods I was trying.

 

There are no dramatic changes. My stomach has been mostly OK, but then sometimes it is for a few days. I have put on a bit of weight and look better. My sleep has been more solid, I am in a better routine and actually spending less time in bed. I haven't had any sudden attacks of tiredness. But then I sometimes do get good days with the tiredness . . . but not often this many . . .

 

But last Wednesday I had a bit of an accident with a cheese sandwich. (I was out, I was hungry, and the moral of the story is that I should either eat before I go out or take something with me.) Anyway, a few hours later I suddenly felt really tired, like I had to go to sleep right now, and my heart was beating really hard. That passed after a few hours. I did not go to bed because I realised what it was. In the past I would have gone to bed for several hours because of that, and it would happen several times a week. The following day my guts were angry, and gradually calmed down after a few days. So it looks like it is making a difference.

 

I do hope to completely cut out dairy, but it's harder than gluten, and I really miss cheese. I made a lasagne this evening with lots of mustard in the (soya) topping, but it isn't the same without cheese. I keep thinking that if it proves to be worth it, then I will do it, but I'm finding it really hard to give it the opportunity to prove itself. I bought some lactose-free milk, which might help to work out whether the problem is lactose or casein.

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have you tried goats cheese? Though it still contains the same proteins, it is supposed to be better.

 

I'm just making my first batch of gluten free crumpets! They don't look like crumpets!!! :unsure: The new shop ones are so expensive - nearly �2 for four!!

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