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Sammysnake

Ideas on wobble board activities for DCD

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Hi all. Just picked up a wobble board from the charity shop which I thought I would start using in a fun way with my 10-year-old. She has AS and mild DCD. Her overall body movement is getting better as she grows but her posture remains poor and she doesn't really use her hips when she walks which gives her a very heavy step and she kind of 'lollops' (I couldn't think of a real word to describe it! ) which affects her stamina. I heard a wobble board might help.

 

Has anyone here used one and can suggest any specific things we could try doing with it to help? We're going to do it together and challenge one another. We've also been given a stepping machine and Beth's going to help me start a fitness regime over the holidays (Lord help us!!)

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i have DCD ( Dyspraxia) and A.S i'm 21 year old female i have found what has helped me improve working on my balance ,co-ordination skills that are weaker due to this is wii fit plus as they are fun games so don't even feel like you are working on any of these skills just enjoying and having fun so i would suggest this .... i go on wii fit every day and have notice an improvement!

 

XKLX

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The two I can remember were making the edge of the board touch the ground in a circle (so starting in one place and working round, clockwise or anticlockwise, til get back to start) and throwing a koosh ball from hand to hand while on the board.

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philipo   

I get a bit obssesive about balancing and exercise.if I don't do it regualry then I have problems walking straight.What they call Tai Chi is good.It involves simple breathing exercises while moving the bodies weight form one side to the other its very relaxing on the mind,trampolines are good,but a bit dangerous.DANCING is brill!!!balance and motion.

I was dx's last autumn at 48 so had alot of re evaluation about my life to do.One thing was very clear,balance had been very important and I relaised that's why I loved sports that involved balancing like Tai chi/tai kwando,cycling,mountain bike stunting,sailing and riding motorcycles for 30 years,and juggling.I was completly unaware how important balancing was for me.

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smileyK   

i been tripping over so much lately i have dyspraxia plays up for a while then goes away then comes back for abit goes in circles of playing up really! so annoying/frustrating! i tripped up endless times walking on treadmill at the gym and just walking in general nearly fall flat on my face so embarrasing especially at the gym when everyone watching you or hears you tripping!!! don't know why decided to flare/play up just does! gr! :( anyone else the same?

 

 

XKLX

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i stumble from time to time. Yes, it's all about coordination. Usually, we have an idea/plan in our heads but our bodies do something different. But I thought you did Zumba?

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smileyK   

had to stop zumba classes are were in afternoon of a lunchtime and didn't fit around my one hr work was gutted! and don't feel i keep up attend evening classes as have get pbulic transport such as bus or get parents drive as not in my town area! :( i go swimming which supposed be good for co-ordination maybe should start going on wii fit more often again too!

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Isobel   

Uneven ground is worst for me, I once went down with a bang over a hidden tree root when walking around Cragside (national trust property) and slightly sprained my wrist as I landed on it. I go dog training in an indoor riding school and proper running I can cope with on the soft ground, but if I just speed up to a fast walk I can trip over my feet.

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trekster   

Omega 3 oils and sensory diet techniques can help with the co ordination issues. Another one is to get your ears checked as ear infections or blocked ears can make the problem worse.

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trekster   

My physio really doesn't understand my additional disabilities so the diagnosis of HMS was the best thing she did for me.

Combination of omega 3s (take for 12 weeks to get an effect) and avoiding gluten helped mine.

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trekster   

Please explain Mike? Do you consider yourself to be dyspraxic?

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I have a friend who does and they assure me that whenever they're rushed to do anything their problem tends to be exasperated. A similar thing happens with stammering - when someone stutters on their words and someone barks at them "come on hurry up!" they're even more likely to stammer because their brain is suddenly fogged by emotion and the words stumble all over the place as the focus on co-ordination is stressed.

 

Take the stressful situation away, free the person of unnecessary expectations, and conversation runs much smoother.

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No but what I'm saying is stammering is a similar phenomena to dyspraxia only rather than tripping over one's own feet, one is tripping over their words!

 

The common ground is the "tripping over" part.

 

Often insights are made when seemingly incongruent subjects are cross-correlated. Okay yours is physical dyspraxia; well mine is a kind of verbal dyspraxia and I know that when the atmosphere in a situation is socially tense that I will stammer more by falling over my words more. It took me a long time to realise this and couldn't understand why some times I would stammer but other times my speech was perfect. Yes I went to speech therapy and took all the courses of speech modification they threw at me but no one could understand why even with these I still stammered when I did.

 

I had the physical ability to speak perfectly (or like those who didn't stammer) and some times this was even true. At other times (such as times of upheaval when moving house or something) my stammer would suddenly flare up again and right when I needed good speech to make new friends at new schools my stammer would prevent me from doing this. And as the bullying kicked in from my speech impediment so this would make my stammer even worse. In retrospect I see it now but back then I couldn't and neither could the experts.

 

Plunged into a can of uncertainty and put under intense pressure and expectation from my peers who (at 13/14) were very unkind towards someone with a stammer, my situation was hairy at the best of times. It's amazing what such stresses can do - they either make you or they break you. My speaking confidence was in ruins and it took a lot of hard work to claw back that confidence and turn things around.

 

When I got to Sixth Form and had found a good group of friends to spend time with my confidence grew and I stammered less. It came back again at the end of school when I was to face my next set of challenges. And I have since learned to stay away from circumstances I know will cause me to stammer more. At times when this is not possible I know I need to take a step back for a bit until the upheaval settles and I can once again speak with confidence and a smile.

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actually my dyspraxia also i been told makes things hard for me to understand auditory and verbal understanding of things.

 

I have the coordination difficulties and verbal and auditory difficulties.

 

Was u diagnosed with dyspraxia?

Edited by Special_talent123

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I have learned in recent times that I do have something known as "auditory discriminatory disorder" which means while I have very powerful hearing I might not interpret what's said as accurately as the next person. I also have a verbal disability known as a stammer but the way I understand it now is that it seems closely related to what those with dyspraxia experience. While I do have a diagnosis of dyspraxia, I do believe there is some cross-over here which cannot merely be ignored. In fact it may even be that my stammer could have been classed as DVD (Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia) as named on Wikipedia.

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Diagnosed Dyspraxia is why I am learning to dance, because our body can get it right normally, so as we learned to walk, then one ca n learn to dance, but what it is about dancing is everything is broken down to individual movements and practised, in time more movement is added until one has a choreography, a whole sequence of movement learned thus proving we can get out of this if we think about it. Yes, I learn slowly, I have been dancing four years now and have not yet been happy enough with my movement to perform, but I will get there, perhaps next year although I am under to perform this coming November, my dance teacher says I know it, but with me, I have to be happy, as I am a bit of a perfectionist.

 

My dance teacher is also dyspraxic which is good for me because she does not shout out left or right as she can't work it out herself and has to point in the direction or say move towards some part of the room and she is a world class dancer having won many competitions for her dancing, thus proving dyspraxia can be worked around and conquered completely if one puts their mind to it.

 

I also play shoot'em up games on the playstation 2 to improve my hand to eye co-ordination.

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oakers   

I was talking to the doctor I saw about EDS and she said I'm likely dyspraxic after I told her about my seemingly wonderous ability to fall into doorways or over my own feet... and that's without rushing most of the time!

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