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BigWinters

Autism Friendly Film Screenings

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Hi.

 

I'm currently on a creative writing degree and for a part of my course you have to produce a large script for whatever format you want. I chose a comic book. I'm a decent writer, by the way. Not great, but improving.

 

My comic book focuses on a group of young people in Manchester, coming to terms with themselves in the face of greater society changes and opinions. Stuff like young people's expectations for the future, how young people are represented.

 

One of the characters I have broadly based upon myself. Whilst I've never been tested for Asperges or Autism, I can really relate to a lot of traits and symptoms throughout the spectrum. Maybe I have Asperges, and maybe I don't; I honestly don't know. I also don't particually feel a need to find out for sure, or maybe that's just fear talking. Who knows.

 

I wanted a character to reflect some of the feelings and thoughts and worries about myself that I have daily. I also wanted the character to either help out at a Autism Friendly Film screening, or just to simply go to one. Partially to compare himself to those who have been officially diagnosised, but to force himself to get involved with something outside of his comfort zone, in an effort to disprove his own tendency of hating change and new people.

 

Whilst I am planning on going to one of these screenings, I wanted to ask if anyone on this forum has had more experience in these screenings, in any way, simply to make it more realistic instead of relying on my own data. If anyone also has any ideas about the character, they would be appreciated as well.

 

You can message me on here.

Thanks!

 

Edited to remove personal details.

Edited by Lyndalou

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trekster   

Autism friendly is a very abstract concept, if you have difficulties with background noise then autism friendly wouldn't help as the autistics extra sound effects would distract you. If you can cope with being unable to see most of the film due to the background noise and need less film noise then it could work.

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Lynden   

We take my son to the showings. They suit him for several reason. a) you don't have to sit through adverts and trailers, it goes straight into the movie and B) he doesn't have to be quiet all the way through ;) He's not overly noisy but he does a little commentary on the movie which might annoy some. The volume is also quieter which suits him as he is sensitive to loud noises. What did you want to know about them?

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Just out of interest what is it you mean by 'autism friendly'? Most autistic's I know watch mainstream films just like anyone. They read mainstream books, listen to mainstream music and do all sorts of mainstream things. So what is it you're implying when you say 'autism friendly'?

 

Thanks

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Just out of interest what is it you mean by 'autism friendly'? Most autistic's I know watch mainstream films just like anyone. They read mainstream books, listen to mainstream music and do all sorts of mainstream things. So what is it you're implying when you say 'autism friendly'?

 

Thanks

 

Dumbed down ?

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Sa Skimrande! They are not dumbed down, they are the normal films. They are really good for perhaps people who struggle in a usual cinema setting. in my case my son would be bored by the trailers and may annoy others talking or if he gets excited about something in the film

 

Cineworld and Odeons hold monthly autism friendly screenings

 

The key changes are:-

  • The lights will be on low
  • The volume will be turned down
  • There will be no trailers at the beginning of the film
  • You'll be able to take your own food and drinks
  • You'll be able to move around the cinema if you like

I think your comment of dumbed down is not very understanding, you should know that autism affects people differently

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Sa Skimrande! They are not dumbed down, they are the normal films. They are really good for perhaps people who struggle in a usual cinema setting. in my case my son would be bored by the trailers and may annoy others talking or if he gets excited about something in the film

 

Cineworld and Odeons hold monthly autism friendly screenings

 

The key changes are:-

  • The lights will be on low
  • The volume will be turned down
  • There will be no trailers at the beginning of the film
  • You'll be able to take your own food and drinks
  • You'll be able to move around the cinema if you like

I think your comment of dumbed down is not very understanding, you should know that autism affects people differently

 

I have had sensory issues all through my life but being late diagnosed I just had to get on with it accept what the neuro typical accept, I had to, there was no other option and so I just do what they do, in other words, I fit in because it is my experience that is what I had to do, or go without.

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Isobel   

I take my own food into normal cinema viewings without any problems? I just hide it in my bag, and I don't see how moving round the cinema in a normal one could be frowned upon if its done within reason.

Dumbed down is not a good term to use, AS sufferers do have near normal intelligence.

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Hi Isobel - the term 'AS sufferers' is also not a good one to use for some people - I have Aspergers, and I don't feel I suffer. Apart from hangovers. I suffer them a lot. :)

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Dumbed down is not a good term to use, AS sufferers do have near normal intelligence.

 

Okay, I will rephrase ; mollycoddled because they have a disorder and there is an industry involved.

 

But you mention AS sufferers do have near normal intelligence, I do agree and I will also further they have higher intelligence in many respects, but if they have near normal intelligence, why is there a need for Autism Friendly film screenings ?

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Here's a great place that does Autism Friendly Screenings and they explain what that term means in relation to the cinema.

 

http://www.glasgowfilm.org/theatre/whats_on/season:access_take_2

 

These are more for children, but you get the gist.

 

I don't think intelligence is really being called in to question here - it's more sensory issues and the like.

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Here's a great place that does Autism Friendly Screenings and they explain what that term means in relation to the cinema.

 

http://www.glasgowfi...n:access_take_2

 

These are more for children, but you get the gist.

 

I don't think intelligence is really being called in to question here - it's more sensory issues and the like.

 

Very good then, but what about the future are children going to receive autism friendly entertainment when they pass that all important age of 18, or will they be just expected to get on with it like everyone else and where there is not the training, that is the joining in of the rest of society they will undoubtedly struggle to fit in ?

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Well, I never had autism friendly screenings when I was little. But over time I learned to cope and find ways of being able to enjoy mainstream entertainment without losing out. I wear noise reducing earplugs that let me enjoy loud films and gigs. I use the disabled areas in concert halls and festivals that allow me to have fun without having to worry about people triggering panic attacks etc

 

Site like these are also a great way to find out how other people cope and try it out for themselves.

 

I mystery shop entertainment venues on how disability friendly they are - if they aren't they are given recommendations on how to change that and are also given awareness training.

 

Things are getting better.

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Well, I never had autism friendly screenings when I was little. But over time I learned to cope and find ways of being able to enjoy mainstream entertainment without losing out. I wear noise reducing earplugs that let me enjoy loud films and gigs. I use the disabled areas in concert halls and festivals that allow me to have fun without having to worry about people triggering panic attacks etc

 

Neither did I and nor did I have a disorder, I was just badly behaved but I soon learned to fear the burning sting on the back of the legs, behave or else ! But I don't like loud noise and so no tv, I live in silence but where it is noisy I just exit the situation if it bothers me that much, plug in my headphones if I can for controlled soothing noise where I can escape into my own world or do my best to ignore what I don't like as I have spent a lifetime learning to ignore what bothers me including bullying.

 

Site like these are also a great way to find out how other people cope and try it out for themselves.

 

I am skeptical because I see industry at work and where there is potential to make money many things will be invented.

 

I mystery shop entertainment venues on how disability friendly they are - if they aren't they are given recommendations on how to change that and are also given awareness training.

 

Things are getting better.

 

Personally I see a lot of experimentation and of those experimented on can they be reprogrammed when it is found the experiment was not the ideal and what of those that hit 18, will they be forgotten to just get on with it as they are now adults with faulty programming whilst the focus shifts to the new subjects for further experimentation and those damaged are no longer their concern.

 

Now as the late diagnosed exist, you, me and many others, are we not proof that just joining in with everyone else and finding our own way through life unhindered is the best course of action, as to understand there are many potential aspies out there that have not yet been diagnosed and potentially won't be because they have found their way of existing in society and are going from strength to strength ?

 

Look at it, I have even served in the armed forces where there was many like me, an ordered environment- aspie paradise especially in what I was concerned with; aircraft avionics where keen intellects thrive.

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Lynden   

I'm a bit surprised by the comments here. Surely the fact that places are recognising that some situations can be difficult for some people with ASD and are catering for that is a positive? Surely it's nice that our kids don't have to struggle through it or go without? I for one appreciate being able to take my son to something he really enjoys, knowing that at least some of the sensory issues he faces have been addressed. He does have additional learning difficulties and may not be able to reason through some things like those who are higher functioning.

 

As a parent, it's also nice to be able to take your child out into an environment where they are not going to be judged. Incidentally, many soft play activity centres now offer time slots for those with SEN, and the NAS have an ASD friendly showing of the Lion King in London's West End in May.

 

I know many adults on the spectrum who would have welcomed such things and who definitely would not agree that finding their way through life unhindered was the best course of action for them.

 

Edited to add that none of these cost any more than the mainstream version so it's not necessarily about money.

Edited by Lynden

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Lyndalou   

There are going to be regular Autism Friendly film screenings locally from now on and I hope to take my son to one of them soon. I took my son to a regular advance showing of the last Thomas movie and I swear that it was even louder in the cinema than it normally is when I go with pals! Either that, or I was acutely aware of how much my son was struggling. I went with 3 other mums and their kids, 2 of which are on the Autistic Spectrum like my son. One of the little boys couldn't make it past the foyer even with ear defenders on - it was just too busy, noisy and bright for him. My son coped well until we got into the cinema. I believe my son is more sensitive to noise than me but if there is an incentive he can cope better with it and that incentive was that he knew it was a Thomas movie which he loves. Through the adverts, I had him sitting on my lap with me holding him close to me with my hands over his ears (he won't wear ear defenders). Then he switched to his own seat with me still holding my hands over his ears. As the movie went on he sat up as he was enjoying the movie so much and therefore was coping better with the noise. I and the other mum with her son deliberately sat close to the stairs just incase we needed to get out quickly!

 

What I'll probably try to do is go both to Autism Friendly screenings and to screenings of films I think my son will have more interest in. The Autism Screenings may take the pressure off a bit for my son and for me.

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I'm a bit surprised by the comments here. Surely the fact that places are recognising that some situations can be difficult for some people with ASD and are catering for that is a positive? Surely it's nice that our kids don't have to struggle through it or go without? I for one appreciate being able to take my son to something he really enjoys, knowing that at least some of the sensory issues he faces have been addressed. He does have additional learning difficulties and may not be able to reason through some things like those who are higher functioning.

 

As a parent, it's also nice to be able to take your child out into an environment where they are not going to be judged. Incidentally, many soft play activity centres now offer time slots for those with SEN, and the NAS have an ASD friendly showing of the Lion King in London's West End in May.

 

I know many adults on the spectrum who would have welcomed such things and who definitely would not agree that finding their way through life unhindered was the best course of action for them.

 

Edited to add that none of these cost any more than the mainstream version so it's not necessarily about money.

 

My over riding question is, where all this is leading to, is what is going to happen at aged 18 and beyond, because I know for a fact there is precious little support for adult Asperger's, where it very much is we have but one option; get on with it with everyone else and put up or don't get involved.

 

And my comments that you may be surprised about come from bitter experience as an adult with this thing.

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Isobel   

Don't take the term sufferer too literally (yes, I realise AS people do have that trait as indeed I do) its just I chose the wrong word to describe an AS person, sorry. I suppose I should have said people affected by Autism can have normal intelligence.

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trekster   

yes and the only time I could hear the film is when music was playing,

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Lyndalou   

My over riding question is, where all this is leading to, is what is going to happen at aged 18 and beyond, because I know for a fact there is precious little support for adult Asperger's, where it very much is we have but one option; get on with it with everyone else and put up or don't get involved.

 

And my comments that you may be surprised about come from bitter experience as an adult with this thing.

My understanding is that there is no age restriction to go to one of these screenings. I'll be very interested myself to see how it is for me when I go to one with my little boy!

 

It's probably like a lot of things from when we were younger. The TV's are bigger now, there are gadgets pinging and dinging everywhere and cinemas have Dolby Surround Sound and are so much bigger and busier than when we were children. I think it is important for my son to learn to cope with the world as it is today and to prepare him for the adult world. Therefore, I expose him to all sorts of situations he finds difficult in order to stretch him and make him a more capable person in the long run. This, I feel is a good way for him to still be exposed to the hustle and bustle of a cinema and to get used to being in close proximity to a lot of noise and a certain degree of stress without him having to be overwhelmed by it.

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Lynden   

My over riding question is, where all this is leading to, is what is going to happen at aged 18 and beyond, because I know for a fact there is precious little support for adult Asperger's, where it very much is we have but one option; get on with it with everyone else and put up or don't get involved.

 

And my comments that you may be surprised about come from bitter experience as an adult with this thing.

 

As Lyndalou said - these are all open to adults too, although many of the films are geared towards children, not all are and there have definitely been adults at the ones I've attended. I still expose my son to many things he finds challenging as I do agree he has to live in our world. I definitely welcome things that make his life easier though.

 

I work for a centre that provides, amongst other things, support for adults with AS and am involved in a board that is setting our LA plan for supporting adults with ASD but I agree 100% that support is sorely lacking - no argument there.

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My understanding is that there is no age restriction to go to one of these screenings. I'll be very interested myself to see how it is for me when I go to one with my little boy!

 

It's probably like a lot of things from when we were younger. The TV's are bigger now, there are gadgets pinging and dinging everywhere and cinemas have Dolby Surround Sound and are so much bigger and busier than when we were children. I think it is important for my son to learn to cope with the world as it is today and to prepare him for the adult world. Therefore, I expose him to all sorts of situations he finds difficult in order to stretch him and make him a more capable person in the long run. This, I feel is a good way for him to still be exposed to the hustle and bustle of a cinema and to get used to being in close proximity to a lot of noise and a certain degree of stress without him having to be overwhelmed by it.

 

There will be make no doubts about that as can you imagine lone male adults in such an environment with children, the fact that they are affected themselves will mean absolutely nothing.

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The way you had worded it wasn't too clear. Now it is.

 

Good, we have a massive cross to bear for the actions of a minority, but the effect is the same we are not wanted around children and it is I have had to go away from where I was because there were children present and that was on advice from the police who were called because a suspicious parent didn't want me there and I was there before them with my camera pursuing my art of photography. And so I understand one hundred percent, in this society, you are a child you are golden for you just must be protected from people like me, because we are all the same, every one of us, single adult males are not to be trusted around children.

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Lyndalou   

There will be make no doubts about that as can you imagine lone male adults in such an environment with children, the fact that they are affected themselves will mean absolutely nothing.

I would imagine that all children attending these screenings would be accompanied by parents or carers so there would not be any need to be overly concerned by lone adults, male or female in the auditorium. Also, I would hope that there would be a degree of understanding towards any adults attending these screenings on their own too.

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From experience understanding towards single males is sparse and fluctuating, we are all suspected of impure intentions when there are children and women around, we are all predators, add ASD issues and with myself the inter sex weirdness that comes with a XXY genome where I am not at all interested in what it is believed single males are interested in and it makes for a very unhappy life, where one does definitely not fit anywhere, not even into one's own body sometimes, where one is pushed away far more than accepted as there is never the money you see so adults are conveniently forgotten unless they are in the wrong place at the wrong time and then we are all predators that must be moved on.

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