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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
nikrix

Hearing voices

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asereht   

Ceecee, I am very confused as to how your daughter was left severly autistic BUT made a full recovery.

 

I thought autism was something you can't recover from?

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baddad   
Baddad

 

I very much agree that Timelords posts appear confusing and misleading and it is quite right to question this.

 

As my own daughter was left severly autistic after an mmr vaccination then i guess i would be correct in saying in common with lots of people on this forum that asd has affected my life.

 

I am lucky very very lucky she made a full recovery but the flashbacks the panic attacks and subsequent depression suffered by the rest of my family over this has been vast.

 

I will endevour to make my posts more positive in future.

 

ceccee

I have pm you.

 

 

Hi ceecee -

sorry, I did overlook your daughters illness, and i apologise for that.

Without wishing to qualify that apology, I would add though that -given the amount of posts you have made about other family members you have diagnosed and your daughters complete recovery - your interest in the forum does not seem primarily concerned with the historic event you mention.

With regard to the 'positivity/negativity' of posts, this has never been an issue. I have certainly in the past posted many accounts of 'negative' behaviours and situations directly linked to my son's condition, and have reponded with sympathy and support to others who have done so. That said, I have on several occassions felt the need to challenge your own posts - not because they deal with 'negative' issues but because they have contained sweeping generalisations, laid down direct 'challenges' to other forum members and been - quite frankly - offensive to myself, other moderators and other forum users. Almost every negative aspect of the personaility's of every person you have unofficially diagnosed has been 'blamed' on autism. For whatever reason you seem determined to 'justify' those behaviours as being 'autism induced' -despite the repeated attempts of one particular family member to state online that the diagnosis you have made is not welcome, is probably incorrect, and - even IF correct is not the underlying/only reason for the behaviours you have targetted...

In general, i would choose to address these issues privately through the PM system, but as the factors I highlight have been regularly aired/argued/dissected on the open forum - DESPITE many requests (both in the open forum AND through PM's) that the forum not be used in such a way, I see little point in discretion at this stage. I also think that the nature of your last post seems to imply an unfair 'bias' that would not have been clearly addressed for other members through the PM system. I will certainly read your PM and respond accordingly, but felt an online response to the above to be more appropriate.

 

BD

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ceecee   

Baddad

 

If you read through my posts you will see i have always tried to help and support others on this forum.Obvoiusly you see things differently.

 

My daughters illness is certainly not my only reason for coming on this forum.I just wanted to give something back as a kind of thank you for her recovery and helping and supporting others when I was in a similar sitution myself for six months is my way of doing that.Later on when my children are older i would like to help at a local pre scool special needs group.If i can get rid of the panic attacks and flashbacks!!!

 

 

Whilst you might see my daughters illness as a historic event, I do not.

 

Anyway I will be leaving it here.

 

 

asereht

 

My daughter had autistic encephalitus following an mmr booster.I was told she would never recover but luckily after six months she made a full recovery.

Edited by ceecee

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Timelord, don't go! I know what it's like to express an unpopular opinion and us oddballs (strange, I never thought of myself as an oddball until I came on here) need to stick together! Not read any of your other posts, but based on what I've read here, here's my two-penn'orth.

 

Out on a limb here, but there have been many recent developments showing autism and schizophrenia share similarities:

 

For many years, researchers believed autism and schizophrenia were different variants of the same disorder, but epidemiological research showed that the two disorders did not occur more frequently in the same families than would be predicted by chance, so since about 1971, we have taught that they are distinct. However, more recent research suggests they may be related. Work from Patricia Goldman-Rakic's laboratory at Yale, Daniel Weinberger's laboratory at the National Institute of Mental Health, and Edward Jones' laboratory at the University of California, Irvine all implicates maldevelopment of centers in the medial temporal cortex and limbic structures in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Moreover, at the cellular level, there is evidence that nerve cells do not mature properly in schizophrenics and that they may also not migrate properly. Thus there appear to be many common threads linking schizophrenia and autism. My own view, at this point unsupported by anything more than informed hunch, is different genes are responsible for schizophrenia and autism (thus explaining why they do not excessively co-occur in families) but that the biochemical function of these genes are highly related, and they may even be members of the same gene family. As more progress is made identifying the genes involved in autism and schizophrenia, we will have the opportunity to examine this hypothesis directly.

 

http://www.narsad.org/news/newsletter/spec...archautism.html

 

And linking them both (drum roll please)... to diet

 

 

"We think this process is linked to the production of antibodies in the gut when you eat something you're sensitive to," Cade said. "Both schizophrenics and autistics have a high incidence of [certain] antibodies, and a high incidence of diarrhea, which points to an intestinal disorder. So we think that with autism and schizophrenia, the basic disorder is in the intestine, and these individuals are absorbing beta-casomorphin-7 that they normally should break down in the body as amino acids, rather than peptide chains up to 12 amino acids long."

 

http://www.napa.ufl.edu/99news/autism.htm

 

Anyway it's about time I threw my hat in the ring and said that it's my own personal hunch that autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimers have more commonalities than differences. Age on onset being the principle differences: pre 2 for autism, between 6 and 50 for schizophrenia (two distinct peaks in there) and over 50 for Alzheimers.

 

I've a few studies I could pull out to support my oddball theory, but frankly I am just too knackered to type any more right now and it's not as if this is RL, is it?

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asereht   

Jaded, maybe you should read some of timelords posts.Especially the two I quoted. I don't have a problem with him expressing an opinion but likewise am entitled to mine.It's the confusing contradictions I have a problem with.

 

 

 

 

Also we seem to be going off topic,maybe we should get back to advice for nikrix.

 

Sorry Nikrix.I am sure some of us were just trying to see that you get the right advice.

 

 

Did you ring the consultant yet?

Edited by asereht

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Theresa I had read Timelord's posts. As the apparent contradiction had already been pointed out I didn't feel the need to make a direct comment until Timelord made a response. My opneing remarks were aimed at Timelord to encourage such a response.

 

The main purpose of my post was to point out that there is some scientific basis to autism and schizophrenia being similar, information which may be of some use to the OP.

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bid   

Hi :unsure:

 

I really know very little about schizophrenia, but one of my concerns is that conditions can often be 'similar', without being the same thing....

 

For example, my dad has Vascular Dementia, which presents as extremely similar to Alzheimers...BUT, the causes are completely different, as Vascular Dementia is caused by a series of strokes, unlike Alzheimers.

 

I also wonder whether the fact the Alzheimers (and Vascular Dementia, come to that) 'mirrors' autistic behaviour necessarily means that the two are in some way linked...

 

Bid :bat:

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Guest hallyscomet   
Guest hallyscomet

:oops: please read next post. dont know what I did here.

 

But can we get back to Nikrix......Please.... :wub:

Edited by hallyscomet

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Guest hallyscomet   
Guest hallyscomet
Nikrix,

 

Before my son was put on Risperdal he was presenting with all those things you mentioned, I observed this a lot and just took it on board, oh well this is part of the Autism world. However I noticed him doing this around 4 -6 years and again on and off up until 12years old.

 

Nikrix as your child is having these illusions or hearing voices does not place them in the "Shizo" category, It could also be sensory overload, or if your child is taking meds, perhaps all these things need to be reviewed. I find I need to get my son every three months at the moment as he needs constant observing by the Paediatrician, I say this is what you need to do for the moment. >:D<<'> >:D<<'> The doctor will get to the bottom of this and tell you first hand, they also need to be informed of any changes that concern you.

 

WITH REGARD TO THE DEBATE GOING: :) My son attended a 'Study Skills" program at the Autism Assoc. near us and when I was filling out the forms I noticed brochures about Schizophrenia. The Consultant said that Schizophrenia has been placed on the ASD Spectrum and at this study skills program today there are teenagers with all different variations of the Spectrum ADHD Aspergers Classic Autism, High Funcitoning Autism and Schizophrenia. Some presenting with three or four different things together combined on the Spectrum. Gets confusing doesn't it thats why you cant compare one child to another. :wub: God love em....

 

My son also takes Risperdal which was always prescribed to Schizophrenics the doctor said 6 years ago they were trialling it on children with Autism, and having a lot of success. It did make a huge difference to my sons world. It allowed him to be able to talk among his peers and in class, something once he reach 12 he was unable to do. It gave him the mental energy to be able to put a sentence together, before that he blurted words at you with no real meaning to me, it was very confusing and hard and I was very teary all the time worrying, we started to have some amazing conversations for the first time, I will never forget this moment. :wub:

 

The thing that annoys me is Schizophrenics can by this medication on PBS for $4.50 and I have to pay $75.90au

its so unfair.

 

 

 

>:D<<'> >:D<<'> >:D<<'>

 

 

 

Hailey

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timelord   

our son was initially daignosed with aspergers at age 12, we were told that without the correct treatment, help, he would also develop paranoid scizhophrenia in time, at the age of 23 he was sectioned and diagnosed with schizophrenia. after hearing voices, throwing all of his furniture out onto th estreet, and digging up his rotary clothes drier, which was embedded in several feet of concrete, he was covvinced, that the clothes dryer was an aeriel wiht which "they were spying" on him, the "voices" told him so. after 3 tears in a psychriatric unit on medication, he now self medicates, he has now been diagnosed with aspergers, and you think you are confused.

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Flora   

Wendy Lawson (AS author and speaker) was dx with schizophrenia when she was 15 and was in and out of mental institutions for most of her adult life until she was in her 40's when a new psychiatrist diagnosed autism and ruled out schizophrenia. The reason for the original dx was that at 15 she tried to commit suicide and a psychiatrist asked her the following questions.

 

'Do you hear voices?'

 

To which she replied 'Of course I do'

 

He then asked 'what do they say?'

 

She replied 'well it depends who is speaking'.

 

'Oh' he said 'So you hear more than one voice?'

 

She replied 'Well of course, I hear hundreds of voices'.

 

And there followed the dx of schizophrenia!!!

 

Not sure how relevant this is to the discussion.

 

Lauren

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baddad   
our son was initially daignosed with aspergers at age 12, we were told that without the correct treatment, help, he would also develop paranoid scizhophrenia in time, at the age of 23 he was sectioned and diagnosed with schizophrenia. after hearing voices, throwing all of his furniture out onto th estreet, and digging up his rotary clothes drier, which was embedded in several feet of concrete, he was covvinced, that the clothes dryer was an aeriel wiht which "they were spying" on him, the "voices" told him so. after 3 tears in a psychriatric unit on medication, he now self medicates, he has now been diagnosed with aspergers, and you think you are confused.

 

 

Hi timelord -

 

Firstly, let me say I am NOT trying to dispute either your account of the information you were given, or any diagnosis of scizophrenia your son may have received. As I said in my original post - it IS entirely possible that your son is within that very small percentage of people who DO have schizophrenia...

What i did challenge was the statement a professional made that 'without the correct treatment he would develop paranoid schizophrenia' and the original statement that this would be the case for around 90% of people with an ASD...

Two problems with that: Firstly, the predictive information you were given has no basis in fact; Secondly, the statistical information you were given has no basis in fact.

I hope you'll appreciate that neither of those statements is a 'challenge' to you, just a statement of the alternative (and more generally accepted) perspectives on schizophrenia.

 

One other thing i find very disconcerting is the IMPLICATION that professionals' statements placed on YOU and the rest of your son's support networks... "Without the correct treatment and support he would develop schizophrenia"... The fact that he DID develop schizophrenia IMPLIES a level of 'blame' on the people providing the treatment and support (presumably the original consultant included?), because it obviously WASN'T the 'correct' treatment and support...

 

As a parent, I would be up in arms at such an accusation. As a moderator of this forum I would want other users to be reassured that this information was WRONG, and save them any guilt associated with that implied 'blame'. I would also want to reassure parents of newly diagnosed children that the implications for their own children are not so cut and dried...

 

As I said in an earlier post - any decision about your continued use of the forum has to be made by you, but I would assure you that my own comments (and those others I've read) are directed toward the content of your post and it's validity in the context of the conditions it references. They are not intended to challenge your personal views or beliefs, or your son's DX...

 

Hope that's helpful

 

BD :D

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Zemanski   

Timelord,

the debate around schizophrenia and autism is old and ongoing. They are different conditions but perhaps your son does have both and perhaps the consultant recognised signs that he was at risk for schizophrenia when he was first diagnosed which is maybe why he told you it was so likely to happen, why he might generalise that to all people diagnosed with ASCs is a puzzle because it simply isn't true.

 

AS is a developmental condition which is seen in childhood and even for those diagnosed late in life there is a requirement for the indicators to be there in the person's developmental history. This is not the case for schizophrenia which often appears in the late teens and twenties with little or no sign in the person's development prior to the first episode. Both have a neurological basis, and possibly involve similar areas of the brain which may account for similar affects, also both can be seen to run in families suggesting a genetic potential but even if there is a link it is not one that indicates that the majority of ASC people will develop schizophrenia.

 

This site is for people on the autistic spectrum and there are all sorts of people here from autistics themselves like Lucas, to parents and carers, to professionals working in the field, some of us fit all the cateories :blink:

We all come from different places in our views so sometimes the debates we enter are pretty heated but we don't mean to frighten people off and certainly didn't intend to make you feel personally attacked, sorry.

 

We know a lot more about ASCs than schizophrenia - this is not eally our field so I suppose we haven't done a lot to answer questions, perhaps we should go back to what we all know most about and talk about AS.

 

How does your son's AS affect him? Does he get help and support at all?

 

Zemanski

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The discussion of schizophrenia and ASD is difficult, for many years parents of ASD children were told that their children had Childhood Schizophrenia, this all to common mis diagnosis led to the unecessary distress, there are still some practioners who advocate that AS is CS which is in fact extremely rare.

 

Although not an expert on this, I have read much as most people here, and the use of an inappropriate CS dx has been more harmful, alongwith the remove the child from the parents as the AS is due to poor parenting, ignorance breeds abuse.

 

As has been said AS is a development delay, Schizophrenia becomes apparent during late teenage years to early adulthood. I recently lost a very good friend who was schizophrenic, he was not always thus and had once been a happy and fulfilled child and teenager, unfortunately this all changed when he was 19-20 and he spent the next 12 years of his life very lost, he jumped between taking his meds and not, when he was well after periods of taking them he believed he could stop and he would still be well, unfortunately this was not the case as those around him witnessed, he was a passive schizophrenic but extremely paranoid and he was also in no way ASD.

 

When I was younger I regularly used to 'see' things and hear voices, I still occassionally have moments now, usually just visual flickering or traces, the seeing things and hearing things I never told my parents or anyone for fear of what they might think, it wasn't until T was dx'd and then subsequently my own dx, that I realised that I'm not going mad (although thats debateable ... trying to lighten the tone a bit here) T does see things and suffers from extremely visual night visions ... always the same thing, wolves are coming in his room, and he has always talked to himself, whether he hears voices I am not sure, but he is quite happy chatting away to himself, it doesn't bother him and it doesn't bother me.

 

This is something that I have always been uncomfortable talking about, for precisely the reasons that I might be dx'd with something that is totally inappropriate. I am truly sorry for Timelords son and the experiences you have had to go through as a family, you obviously love your son very much, but I think that baddad is right when he says that 'IMPLICATION that professionals' statements placed on YOU and the rest of your son's support networks... "Without the correct treatment and support he would develop schizophrenia"... The fact that he DID develop schizophrenia IMPLIES a level of 'blame' on the people providing the treatment and support (presumably the original consultant included?), because it obviously WASN'T the 'correct' treatment and support...'

 

As a parent I would also be up in arms about this, where was the right treatment and support, if this could have been avoided then why didn't anyone do anything about this ... some serious questions to be asked of those who were responsible for the well being of your son.

 

HHxx

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bridie   
lack of proper help and support, is one of the drawbacks of living in a remote island community.

 

 

Timelord, I think until people actually experience living in a remote place it can never really be understood just what remote means in its entirety. :) I know how it is and can fully understand the fiasco surrounding your son.

Edited by bridie

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It's getting on for 15 years since Timelord's son had his initial diagnosis in the early nineties. Although Lorna Wing gave a vivid clinical account of Asperger's in 1981, much of the 80s were spent thrashing out the diagnostic criteria. The number of people being diagnosed with AS were tiny. I remember reading psychiatric studies published in the 90s where they were trying to estimate the prevalence of disorders in the general population and although the tests were showing something like 50% of the children had a disorder of some kind, the figures for autism and ASD were discarded as being too small. That's such an extraordinary thing to type that I had to look the study up:

 

http://www.priory.com/psych/prevalence.htm

Table 4 shows the percentages of comorbidity among each of the 21 disorders. These percentages were averaged and then rank ordered to examine the extent of comorbidity in each of the disorders. (Bipolar Disorder, Asperger's Disorder, and Autistic Disorder were removed because of their small cell sizes, i.e., below 10). Table 4 demonstrates that MRE was most comorbid, followed by DD, ODD, ADHD, and CD. The two eating disorders, BN and AN demonstrated the lowest levels of comorbidity.

 

So a rare disorder (so much for better diagnosis, greater awareness). Perhaps (another of my hunches) someone receiving the AS diagnosis would have to display some extreme behaviours (i.e. be very distressed) to obtain the diagnosis. At that level of stress perhaps the consultant was reflecting his clinical experience of how the condition would progress.

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Sad to see so much distress and hope that the experience will not put people off asking for help or expressing their honest views.

Maybe we all need to remember that everyone can hold a view different from our own and that there is little that is "true" or "false". Much is our individual perception of a reality that is our unique life experience. :(

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Try not to worry about your daughter hearing voices. Voices normally occur for several reasons. Confusion is one of them. Most children who suffer from ASD find there environment very confusing, ridicule is another factor how is your daughter doing in school. Self esteem also is a contribution factor this is very hard for all ASD children

 

You daughter may be seeing white in front of her and colour swirls as she is finding it very hard and stressful to interact with other children so she may be detaching from her environment. Does this only happen at school or does it happen any were else?

 

It?s wonderful your daughter trusts you and can talk to you about these things :D

 

I hope this helps you.

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timelord   

like i have already stated, how can there be normal autistic behaviour, like the rest of us, no two people are the same, each has his / her own individual characteristics. so how can there be text bok behaviour?????

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Lucas   

Diagnostic criteria for Autism goes by behaviour, but there are strict rules on interpretation and need for seeing it in context: a good diagnostician is not so concerned about what a person does but the reasons why they do it. They must judge based on a complete(complete as possible) history of development, existing and past behaviour to detect the cognitive elements that all Autistics have.

 

After releasing research showing signs of Enhanced Perceptual Functioning in Autistics(regardless of their said level of functioning they exceeded non-Autistics at block design tasks), Canadian researchers Laurent Mottron(Neurotypical) and Michelle Dawson(Autistic) now have a theory that whilst Neurotypical people have Mandatory Higher Order functions, Autistics can choose to use or not use higher brain functions for a task. This effects how we behave. Neurotypicals don't even know when they're using higher brain functions because they're automatic and they can't stop them any easier than they could stop their heart suddenly beating. Autistics can choose, but we don't know when to because we're taught to on the basis that no one even knows we're constantly having to make this choice and so can't adapt teaching skills to it.

 

It's still only a theory(but one that makes so much sense to me from the first-person that I think they proberly will produce neat evidence some time) but it explains certain things:

 

Higher brain functions mean complex things like the use of langauge in a social context, so an Autistic can be overly-literal because they don't know when to apply the higher function of social context to langauge. I might hold a door open for a fat person carrying something, if someone asks me what I'm doing I'd say "I'm holding the door open for the fat guy because his hands are full" and I don't know I'm supposed to be applying social context: the fat guy knows he's a fat guy but is hurt by this being pointed out.

 

I can then be taught not to say such things and to always exercise social context, but this is done in ignorance of the higher order choices I have to make which are mandatory for NTs: I might not move out of the way of a car coming towards me because I'm trying to work out if it's socially acceptable to do so.

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Lucas   

But evidence which is inarguable supporting those theories. Unless it is shown that the evidence does not support the theory, the theory is correct.

 

Science is not an inconclusive belief-system working in terms of 'it proberly is but might not'. It's the objective analysis of evidence to find the truth and that truth is given the credit of it's evidence until new evidence is found or a theory that fits better with the evidence. Scientists tend to be very imaginative(even Autistic ones) and will always imagine every possible interpretation of the evidence and eliminate each one by test to see if any stand up to scrutiny.

 

Both evidence and ethics in Autism are often ignored in favour of stereotypes, remote models and ancedotal-constructed beliefs. No one should pretend there are only theories about Autism when there is a tapestry of evidence giving definitive shape to it.

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Livelife   

I have no experience of people hearing voices though it must be very distressing having this inside your head. Do these voices make people do things out of their normal character or is it a reflection of their own personality and traits. Is it words that a person would not normally speak or understand? Can anybody enlighten me.

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Mihaela   

I have some experience of people with schizophrenia (one was a cousin). The voices are seen as the voices of others - mocking them, giving them orders, etc. They seem to relate to a suppressed part of that person's personality. As they can't distinguish between reality and delusion, they assume the voices to be external and real (the voice of God, the devil, aliens, etc.). They can cause those who 'hear' them to reply back or obey the orders given. A notorious serial murderer of prostitutes, genuinely believed he was hearing God commanding him to fight against 'sin' on his behalf. I had a friend who knew him as a child and liked him, and was given lifts to school by him and never harmed. Many people in secure mental hospitals suffer from paranoid schizophrenia. My cousin went through a very bad patch at one time, but thanks to psychoactive drugs she's managing well in her own flat.

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Livelife   

That must be a very distressing place to be, to hear voices like this to me at least would be terrible I can't understand how they must feel hearing them unless it's normal to them and they don't feel the fear I imagine I would if it were me.

I can't always express properly how i feel about feelings but I'm glad to hear your cousin is managing well in her own flat.

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hsmum   

This is a very interesting thread. My son experienced visual and aural sensations including seeing flashing lights, hearing voices and even feeling like the room was closing in on him. He was diagnosed with Todd's syndrome or Alice in Wonderland syndrome which is a form of migraine with quite strong sensory aura. Later, when his anxiety increased he reported hearing voices again and the psychiatrist said these were related to anxiety rather than psychosis.

 

We found the medical professionals very helpful.

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Mihaela   

I have heard of Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome and read about it only a few weeks ago. The closing-in-of-the-room sense gives it its name (when Alice grew too big for the room she was in). It's associated mainly with childhood and hypnagogic hallucinatory states (when we're about to fall asleep). When I'm short of sleep I suffer from very complex and colourful visual hallucinations which occur mainly when I'm in bed trying to get to sleep. They're not unpleasant and I seem to be able to create and change them with my mind. When I was small in a dark room I feared the room closing in on me, so I always had a night light - and still do. Sleeping in a very dark room frightens me as does waking up in such darkness. I'm not sure if there's a link here with autism, but there could well be, My brother, who was almost certainly on the spectrum - but very different to me - suffered very bad migraines and fibromyalgia. He never spoke of hallucinations - visual or auditory.

AIWS is crucially a disturbance of perception (unlike psychoses). I'm just reading the Wikipedia entry which says it's restricted to visual hallucinations - usually distortions in size, "sound distortion, such as every little movement making a clattering sound" - something I suffer from almost every day, and which I put down to my sensory processing sensitivities - and distortions of time - which I also have occasionally. "Other minor or less common symptoms may include loss of limb control and general dis-coordination, memory loss, lingering touch and sound sensations, and emotional experiences". A truly fascinating condition, and one which seems to be connected very much to SPS, which is so common in autism. Nowhere does it mention hearing voices, though.

Edited by Mihaela

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Livelife   

I find this quite fascinating how this condition effects people and the different ways it presents itself.

I have never had this and find the thought of it a little distressing if I am honest maybe it's because I like to have control over the things that happen to me or what I do which i wouldn't have if I were hearing voices telling me what to do.

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