Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Kris

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
diaz85

Whats the difference between HFA and aspergers?

Recommended Posts

According to the latest DSM, none. Traditionally the distinction comes down to whether there was a delay in learning to speak: yes for HFA, no for Asperger's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
diaz85   

Traditionally the distinction comes down to whether there was a delay in learning to speak: yes for HFA, no for Asperger's.

You see I would have guessed no for HFA aswell. I thought the two things were the same thing. and speaking delay in low to moderate functioning autism (?).

Edited by diaz85

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Canopus   

I read somewhere than on a Myers-Briggs test one was INTJ and the other was INFJ.

 

The Myers-Briggs test was created without any knowledge of AS or HFA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further to my last post, I should clarify that Asperger's has been dropped from DSM-IV (or V, or wherever we are now) but not from ICD10 (the British equivalent).

Edited by Aeolienne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sally44   

I think this is one of the reasons for the change in diagnostic names.

I think it was down to the child's acquisition of language.

 

For example I would say my son was HFA when diagnosed. He learnt to speak by learning TV dialogues verbatim and then putting sentences together like a kind of verbal jigsaw from all the different TV programmes and films he ever watched.

 

Now he is 16 and his speech has come on leaps and bounds. He still has an American accent, but his use of language and understanding of jokes etc is very good.

 

I think there can also be other co-morbid diagnoses that can cloud the issue too. For example having sensory issues, auditory processing disorder, dyslexia etc can all affect educational attainment initially or throughout the school years. Typically those with Aspergers were thought to do okay in school [usually hitting problems around 13+ in secondary school]. However a child with Aspergers and the abovementioned co-morbid diagnoses may struggle in mainstream school for both academic and social reasons.

 

The best advice I think for parents is to try to find out what the potential is. Which is not easy to do. For example my son is severly dyslexic and also has dyscalculia. But because he is assessed as around average cognitive ability, we were able to get funding for a specialist teacher. He started reading at age 15. He is going to take GCSE maths next year! And although we knew the potential was there, we were at a stage where we had accepted that he may never read or write. But if possible we wanted him to have this life skill. Left to the LA he would not have that 1:1 teaching and he would not be in an independent school and he most certainly would not be reading or taking GCSEs.

 

And as any parent will tell you, getting these things in place takes years and years. It doesn't just fall into your lap. We have had to go to 4 educational tribunals in total. The first one with a solicitor. The second one with an advocate from a charity and the last two I did on my own.

 

Another area of difficulty that is often overlooked is anxiety. Many of our children, and adults on the forum have diagnoses of anxiety disorders or OCD etc. These difficulties can be very upsetting for everyone, including the family. For example the World Health Organisation classes OCD in the top 10 health issues that have the greatest impact on social inclusion and ability to work and support yourself.

Edited by Sally44

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×