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Dummie

Toddlers - Play/Activity Ideas Needed Please

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Dummie   

Hello Everyone

 

I'm going through one of my many guilt trips at the moment. This time it's about the lack of time I feel I spend playing with Aidan. To be honest I'm feeling totally clueless about what to do with him. He mostly prefers to play by himself and I find it hard to interact with him. It's such hard work trying to keep his interest and concerntration.

 

Is anyone on here soooooo organised that you have a play/activity routine for your child? Or do you just do things that pop into your mind? Maybe I'm just not creative enough. How do you fill the whole day with meaningful activities?

 

Thank you in advance for your help.

 

Dummie

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Nic m   

hi dummie,

my dd was in nursery as a toddler so it was mostly at the weekend we did things. I always took her for a walk even if it was just to the shop to get milk or a paper. building blocks were a favourite at this time as was painting pictures.

The memory game of placing cards face down and picking pairs was also, and still is, a favourite.

Watching a film and dressing up again still favourites.

The day was structured by time to eat get dressed bathtime etc but no definite timetable for games.

My dd slept well at that age so housework was done at night when she was sleeping, so apart from shopping the weekends were ours.

By the time she got home from nursery she would often be asleep before dinner. her nursery was fabulous and they had the same kind of rule of holistic play with the only set time was snacks and lunch.

Good luck and do your own thing its usually the right way to go.

nic

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Great games for toddlers that encourage interaction are ones that get their attention and are simple. Try bubbles: blow bubbles, wait for reaction, introduce simple words (eg. 'pop' every time a bubble pops), blow again, wait for their reaction and just go with the flow. Try stopping blowing the bubbles, encourage them to ask for more (may be verbal/non verbal) and respond when they ask in some way. Great fun -relax and laugh with them! You can play similar games with balls, or balloons (not if they're terrified of them). Water play and sand play or other messy play are also great for encouraging interaction (beware sensory issues). You've really got to get in there and find out what they like -maybe singing games (row row your boat). Not sure if you've seen the Hanen programme/course, but these were ideas we got from there and they worked brilliantly. We also found any simple repetitive game, like riding horsey and falling off were great too and you can get more complex and introduce language and story with this game too. Good luck and hope that helps,

 

Sue

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Bullet   

Tom is four and a half and loves a lot of toddler games. He loves being swung and rocked so "row row row your boat" and "seesaw margery daw" are very well received. He loves counting and numbers so we did lots of songs related to numbers, eg "five little ducks", "one, two ,three, four five, once I caught a fish alive". He is very fond of traffic lights so I've made up a song for them for him and we play games based on the "ready, steady, go" principle. Water is very popular with him, therefore activities like swimming, playing in the sink or bath or pouring water are also good bets with him.

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elun1   

Hi O is 6 now but much younger than that in the way he needs to be played with. He responds well to visual timetables so I do schedule specific play times on here though try and interact with him obviously through everything we're doing. He was diagnosed aged 2 and one of the best buys I ever made was a book called 'More than Words' which is basically the Hanen approach but written down in parent friendly language. It helps you to assess your child's stage of communication and there are loads of play/music/reading/socialisation activities. We still use it now

Good luck Elun xx

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LizK   

I found playing with my son when he was a pre-schooler hard and still do to a degree. I think you have to learn to follow their lead and be prepared to play with toys non-conventionally as that sort of play may simply not interest them. maybe just copy his play and see what he does? My son liked playing with bubbles trying to pop them. He also enjoyed me blowing up a balloon and letting go off it so it flew around the room. Rolling balls down long cardboard tubes. What are his obsessions and interests? My son loved doors so anything with a door was liked! Rough and tumble or action songs too so 'row row' 'horsy horsy' 'humpty dumpty'

 

We did Earlybird Course which was helpful with play ideas. I again second the Hanen More Than Words book as being a great starting place for advice about play and communication and what Early bird is partly based upon. The book 'Playing Laughing And Learning with children on the autistic spectrum' has lots of practical ideas for preschoolers

 

HTH

 

Lx

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JsMum   

When J was younger a great place to spend some time playing was his bath time, lots of bath toys, I have noticed a lot more are musical themed, but bath time we had a bubble machine, that blow out bubbles around him, a whirl pool in the bath, and toys designed for the bath.

 

Singing games, play cd's and dance, just do it on your own at first then see if he joins in, copy cat games, making a den using the table and a blanket, playing with play do or mix up some cooking ingredients and just mix it up.

 

Sometimes I just play along side him, just been there is sometimes just enough and I am there playing along with his playmobil.

 

A great book for more ideas is a book I bought from ELC called Im Bored, suzy Barratt.

 

JsMum

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Bullet   

I forgot about Humpty Dumpty, Tom loves that as well. Also "This is the way the Lady Rides", with the highway man being flung into the air to go over the ditch. He enjoys music and singing as well and bubbles.

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Charlie loves playdough but ONLY the homemade type, which I prefer to do as I know EXACTLY whats in it as he does sniff and lick things LOL. I have a recipe for one that can be done in the microwave - only takes 2 mins and if wrapped in clingfilm and left in the fridge it lasts for weeks!!

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