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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
tomcat

Post dx, where do I go from here?

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tomcat   

I'm looking for some advice from any out there who can help me. I was diagnosed as being HFA in January shortly after my 32nd birthday, after being given the official diagnosis was handed a photocopy of an NAS leaflet and sent on my way with no further advice from the psychologist or my GP. There are no services in my area for Autistic adults with the exception of an NAS social group that I've been unable to find any information on other than an email address which I've received no response from as yet. The closest place for any interaction, socialisation or advice is Glasgow, around 30 miles and a ton of stress and anxiety away. This just a few short miles away from NAS Scotland's flagship/Crown Jewel, Daldorch House. "Daldorch provides a fusion of care and education across 24 hours for children and young people from 5 to 18 years. In addition, continuing educational opportunities and supported living arrangements are available for young people from 16 to 21 years. In addition the school offers an outreach service for individuals from 5 to 25 years." Effectively over the age of 25, you don't exist. On being diagnosed I was happy, finally we had a name for my differences, we could get things done, move forward with our lives and get the help and advice we needed........ only to hit brick wall after brick wall. Sorry, as I type this I'm starting to realise the resentment and anger that I've been hiding from everyone, myself included.

 

I want, no I NEED support and advice, I NEED a way to get through life without the stress and anxiety that I've been bottling up inside and hiding. Yes I'm autistic, hiding behind a mask of "normality". That's my coping mechanism, that's how I've survived over 30 years of knowing I was different but not knowing how or why really. Being thought of as "maybe a little strange" or "funny" or "different" fighting to hold in the pain, the anger, the tears and the urge just to curl up into a ball and hide from the world. Getting so used to it that it's become second nature, that it's hidden even from me until times like this. I'm not depressed, I'm lost behind a mask or a shell, screaming, crying and fighting to get out but noone can see or hear me, noone can tell that I'm just going through the motions, trying to find a way back to life. How can I say it, who and how can I tell, when I don't even know myself. How can anyone hear me when they don't even know to listen? Help, please?

 

tomcat

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trekster   

http://www.autism.org.uk/directory/search-results/pg=1.aspx

if you type in "adult social groups" and (your postcode) into the

search box it should help you find a closer social group.

 

http://www.autism.org.uk/about-autism/autism-library/magazines-articles-and-reports/reading-lists.aspx

For books about autism on various subjects.

 

"how to be yourself in a world that's different" is one excellent book for newly diagnosed folk.

Books by Luke or Jacqui Jackson are also good fun.

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tomcat   

Thank you, I think typing this post out earlier was good for me, I basically broke through the shell for a little while and my better half read what I typed, called the NAS Helpline and the very helpful lady on the other end did a search. This truly does seem to be a forgotten area, or they believe that it's easy enough for the people from here to reach Glasgow that everything is centred there, we're getting information sent out though and got information for the Abercromby Centre ARC and she called there too, so now it seems I'm going to be inundated with information. I've been reading through posts on here and other places and been finding things I can do and help that I'm actually entitled to but never knew. I DO know that the Disability Employment Advisor at the local JobCentre is as useful as a chocolate fireman "It's hard enough for a "normal" person to get a job, never mind someone with "Learning Difficulties", you're better off staying on benefits". I was struck dumb at that point and we just walked out, my WAIS-III Full Scale Score is SS 164, IQ 139, I have social and organisational problems, not learning problems and here I go again with the pent up frustrations, sorry. Once again, thank you. Just knowing that there are other people out there I can talk to helps a lot.

 

tomcat

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Books by Luke or Jacqui Jackson are also good fun.

How relevant is a "user guide to adolescence" to anyone diagnosed in their 20s? Or has Luke written a user guide to adulthood now?

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