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Python - do / don't try it at home??

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#1 Aeolienne

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 06:07 PM

I've been given a technical test to complete as part of a job application, for which I'm free to use a language of my choice (although the recruiter adds: "We suggest using one of C#, Java, C++, Perl or Python because those are the languages we can grok best, but if you'd rather use something else then we'll do our best to figure it out."). Call me a technophobe, but I'm nervous about installing anything on my clunky home PC that might make other applications run slower. Has anyone here had experience of using Python on a home computer?

#2 Special_talent123

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 08:29 PM

Never

#3 Sa Skimrande

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 02:45 AM

And I was thinking this was a thread on Monty Python, which tells you exactly what I know about computer languages !

#4 raydon

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 02:01 PM

I used to run Python scripts on an old NT machine with no problems, I can't see any reason why there should be issues with it. You will need to specify the Path variable initially, but then the scripts run in the command prompt window.

#5 Isobel

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:57 PM

Nothing wrong with Java, I have that installed.

#6 Aeolienne

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 10:15 PM

I used to run Python scripts on an old NT machine with no problems, I can't see any reason why there should be issues with it.


I’ve never had a single problem installing Python. I’ve worked with a number of people, however, who either have bad luck or don’t read carefully and have managed to corrupt their Windows installation by downloading and installing software. While Python is safe, stable, reliable, virus-free, and well-respected, you may be someone with bad luck who has a problem. Often the problem already existed on your PC and installing Python was the straw that broke the camel’s back.

http://www.itmaybeah...03_install.html

Edited by Aeolienne, 28 December 2012 - 10:17 PM.


#7 raydon

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:49 AM

Often the problem already existed on your PC and installing Python was the straw that broke the camel’s back.


This would apply to any program not just python.

If your PC is clunky have you tried disk cleanup and defragging the hard drive?

From Windows XP onwards you can set a restore point before installing new software, so if anything goes wrong, like the cat jumping on the keyboard or whatever, you can reset the PC to that point. If you are really cautious you could make a complete backup, or copy an image of the hard drive to CD first.

Edited by raydon, 29 December 2012 - 11:31 AM.


#8 Aeolienne

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:54 PM

If your PC is clunky have you tried disk cleanup and defragging the hard drive?

What's that?

#9 Isobel

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:24 PM

Disk clean up is very easy to find, I do it regularly for my laptop
Go to start menu - control panel - then click on system and maintenance - scroll down to the bottom and you should see free up disk space under admin tasks - click on that and make sure its the C drive, then just tick all the boxes it comes up with for things it knows it can delete, and click ok to delete them all.

#10 raydon

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:36 PM

Isobel you just beat me to it, I was beginning to think this is a geek free zone :)

Here is another route to the programs

Disk Cleanup and Disk Defragmenter are two utility programs which come with Windows.
You can find them from Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools >

Disk Cleanup removes temporary files which have been left behind by installs, updates, internet etc and frees up some disk space. There are a few options to select and it shows how much disk space you can reclaim. It is best to do this before defragging.

When files get written to and from the hard disk they get put back in different sectors on the disk and get fragmented. Over time files can be split up into many parts which means the hard disk has to access lots of non contiguous space which slows things down considerably.

Disk Defragmenter reorganises the hard disk so that the files are put back into contiguous sectors.

If you have never done this before the process could take a few hours. I always do mine over night.

#11 Aeolienne

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:39 PM

According to this, the only programming languages with any credentials are C, C++ and Java: The Five Essential Phone-Screen* Questions

* as in preliminary telephone interview



#12 Aeolienne

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 04:21 PM

I've been told that programming at home is a non-starter because my current machine - a Pentium 4 -  is too old-fashioned. And not even safe against viruses, apparently (not that the computer doctor seemed concerned when he did the file transfers from my previous PC). The advice from the person who told me this was to build my own computer(!!)

and to look at job descriptions for "analyst programmer" to see what skills I lack (where do I start?!).


Edited by Aeolienne, 18 September 2014 - 04:22 PM.





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