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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

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Sally44

DS is going to Cubs

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Sally44   

This is the second week he has gone.

He is enjoying it and doing well.

Tonight I just dropped him off and picked him up and he was fine.

 

The group had had to try to think of a new game tonight. My son apparently came up with the winning idea.

 

Then they had to make things eg. build the biggest tower out of spaghetti that would support a marshmallow. Again my son's idea won for his team.

 

Then they had to come up with an idea of how to stop an egg breaking when dropped from a height (about 10 ft off the floor). Again my son's idea won for his team.

 

I am just so pleased for him to have had the satisfaction of being the best for a change. :thumbs::thumbs:

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Kathryn   

That's fantastic! :thumbs:

 

Scouts sounds fun. So how do you build a spaghetti tower that will support a marshmallow? :D

 

K x

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Sally44   

I don't know!!

I've been telling him how well he did - and he's been telling me "okay you can stop talking now." :rolleyes:

 

I've asked him about the game, and he says he just made it up. It's a really good idea. So much for difficulties with imagination - or even theory of mind!!

 

I'm hoping that, as cubs is more practically based, he is going to shine in this environment.

 

It also helps that he is not the only child with needs in this group so his differences are not so obvious.

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Paula   

:thumbs::thumbs:

 

Brilliant stuff realy pleased hes enjoying it.my son goes to a duke of edingburgh thing every monday doing alsorts of practical activites and hes loveing that too............

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dana   

Hi Sally,

I am really happy for you and your son and that he found the place where he can feel valued. We have to take everything what professionals say with a pinch of salt because life is sooooooo unpredictable! :thumbs:

 

Danaxxx

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julie1   

thats great news im so glad your son has found something that suits him, its so wonderful when they fit in with other children and better than that he is doing so well and being accepted as one of the lads.

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baddad   
Hi Sally,

I am really happy for you and your son and that he found the place where he can feel valued. We have to take everything what professionals say with a pinch of salt because life is sooooooo unpredictable! :thumbs:

 

Danaxxx

 

Hem hem......

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My lad used to go, then suddenly refused :wallbash: apparently he always hated it, and only found the voice to say no after 14 months ! Too many children there, too many of them a lot younger than him, and too much noise. They kept trying to get him into team games, much against our advice he would never go for it, and indeed he wouldn't do anything but watch them from a distance, as they told us after we pushed them for their observations.. I asked for individual and solo games support instead, they said "It's not policy, we are an 'Inclusive' play scheme.." So my son left, he wasn't having that.

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Sally44   
My lad used to go, then suddenly refused :wallbash: apparently he always hated it, and only found the voice to say no after 14 months ! Too many children there, too many of them a lot younger than him, and too much noise. They kept trying to get him into team games, much against our advice he would never go for it, and indeed he wouldn't do anything but watch them from a distance, as they told us after we pushed them for their observations.. I asked for individual and solo games support instead, they said "It's not policy, we are an 'Inclusive' play scheme.." So my son left, he wasn't having that.

 

Sorry it didn't work for your son.

Have you ever looked at climbing clubs. My daughter goes to one, and what I really like is the fact that there is such an age range across both males/females climbing. It is quieter and builds confidence. There are a couple of climbing instructors that are on the spectrum. There are a few centres about, but IMO it is best to find one that gives grades to the children as they learn how to tie the knots and operate the equipment. I may introduce my son to this when he is a bit older. He has been before on a birthday party there. He did very well and absailed down from a considerable height.

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lil_me   

How is it going?

 

My youngest loves it so much, he went on 2 camps last year and the boys are really supportive of him (also go to his mainstream school) we did have a few teething issues but he looks forward to camp loads now.

Edited by lil_me

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Sally44   

He's still as keen as ever.

I think I mentioned earlier that he came up with a new game called "bear attack", which the cubs now use! It was really well thought out - the bear takes things from the cubs camp and is asleep on the other side of the river. The cubs have to get back the stuff the bear has taken, without waking up the bear. If the bear wakes up he chases you and anyone who is caught is out. (That has got me wondering all over again about 'difficulties' those on the spectrum are supposed to have - as he needed to have alot of skills to have worked that game out).

Yet, in unstructured play, he really struggles and often gets upset etc.

 

My husband has said that he is a little worried about how much he likes it. DH is afraid he may want to join the army when old enough. I'm not sure that would be possible even if he wanted it. I wonder if anyone does know of autistic people being in the army???

 

We do have a newphew in the army, and my son absolutely worships him.

 

Camping is in May. We are already counting down the days. He has got his first badge - the collectors badge :whistle::whistle: . But he has got to wait until he is sworn in.

 

I've also managed to get my daughter into the local Scouts group. She was really negative about it. But as soon as she went she realised it wasn't at all how she had imagined.

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Tally   

The military is one of the few organisations exempt from the DDA and unfortunately, people with ASD cannot join the army.

 

But since your son has not brought it up himelf, it may never be an issue.

 

Great news that he has found something he enjoys though!

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Hi,

 

I'm an Assistant Cub Leader, about to take on the Leader role with my 20+ Cubs.

 

Yes, Cubs will be noisy at times, with games, craft, learning and 'life skills' usually involving the outdoors such as camp cooking, tracking and map reading, phoning 999 and First Aid, plus 'interesting' things like delivering leaflets for Jumble sales (amazing how otherwise confident children won't do this) and bag packing in supermarkets (very good for social skills). It should still be orderly, with quiet times as well, especially if this would be useful within a specific group - Scouting is flexible for everyone but remember we are all volunteers and don't have the training that teachers get, don't be frightened to offer leaflets or books, web links, or direct conversation.

 

My aim is to do things that school can't, for example we did Chinese New Year last week, made Chinese Dragons with boxes and lots of paint :jester: , we will add material 'bodies' next week and try and dance around the hall - good for team building, coordination, communication skills. We also tried chop sticks and ate some Chinese food and learnt about Confucius. School may be able to do some of this, but at more of an academic level rather than a fun level.

 

If anyone would like to see the Programme we work to then please ask, I'll answer questions even if I have to ask someone else. As for being 'Inclusive' that would be nice, but it's not the rule. Inclusion may mean sitting watching, which is fine. Or even helping the leaders, which is fine too. Although be aware that many groups are struggling for leaders and you may need to offer your help (on a Rota - ask other parents to help) so that there are enough Leaders for safety as well as covering any one - to -one requirements. You should be welcomed with open arms - if not then ask why not ...

 

As for Spaghetti and Marshmallows. That's great fun and can be done at all levels and all ages. Take dry spaghetti and a bag of Marshmallows, use the marshmallows as joints and it's easy to make a 3D cube. Get creative and you can make a tower, for starters see which team can make the tallest tower which is free standing. For more advanced groups make a bridge which will hold a weight.

 

Lots of fun, plus very sticky. Finger licking good!

 

Lynn

 

Added: Can you access this?

 

http://www.scoutbase.org.uk/library/hqdocs...fs/fs250025.pdf

Edited by jaffacakes

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Sally44   

I think each group is very different. There are a number of beavers, cubs groups in our village. But only one of the leaders has any experience of autism (her own daughter is autistic). So this group does seem to have a higher proportion of SEN children in it. And the structure really helps. My son needs to be told to join in etc otherwise he just plays in his head on his own. And it was so nice to see him involved in things he is actually good at. I'm just keeping everything crossed for May and hope it all goes well for him.

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