Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Kris

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
Sign in to follow this  
BethK

The 'autistic Rock'

Recommended Posts

BethK   

My son does the famous 'rain man' rock, usually when he becomes excited or when something is too much to take in. I have managed to limit the amount of times he does this in the general public, so he mainly does it in the house. I've done this for his benefit, I don't want other kids sectioning him out, as he gets older, if that makes sense. Although, he does a lot of 'bouncing' on the spot, if he can't rock, which I suppose is more 'accepted' in the general public.

 

Last year, I brought a big round netted trampoline for the garden, when he has his bouncing episodes, he'll usually go outside onto the trampoline. Thing is, once the rocking/bouncing starts, you just have to let him ride it out. I did try a couple of times to break the cycle but he ends up smacking himself on the head!

 

Does anyone else with an ASD child or adults with ASD, have this bouncing or rocking 'tick' (is it a tick?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
coolblue   

It's a 'tic' - well, the word you want is 'tic' - don't know if the movement is or not.

 

This could be due to a compulsive movement - or it could be a way of regulating balance. Ds's speech therapist advised us to allow ds to move around, rather than sit still, when he was having stories read to him, because the balance system is part of the ear and activating it the part of the brain that processes balance can also activate auditory processing. Don't know whether or not her theory is right, but it certainly dramatically improved his ability to concentrate on what was being read to him.

 

Ds moves up and down (as you say, bouncing), rather than to and fro, but he still rolls his head from side to side when he's tired - has done since he was a baby. My guess is that the best way to deal with it is to channel the movement into something socially acceptable - pacing up and down, for example.

 

cb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lisac   

Yes my son does this too , usually the bouncing on the spot and leaping in the air accompanied by loud yells ( it sometimes looks like he is trying to head butt an invisible football). At 23 you can imagine the stares he gets :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BethK   

23! bless him x

 

I'll mention that to my son's nursery, coolblue, see if it makes a difference with them. Unfortunately, my son doesn't do 'story time' at home, he's just not interested but he has started to come round to it in nursery. It's all trial and error i suppose :)

 

When he rocks back n forth, he has a habit of shaking his hands/wrists. I know he is too young to get him to understand things, I mean my local village knows him and they take no notice, if he has a tic moment in public but imagine as he gets older and he's not in his home town, it could cause him undue stress :(

 

I suppose I over think things!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trekster   

Hello

 

I tend to rock when im in pain or upset or trying to get proprioceptive input into me. For the later I find using my weighted blanket helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
coolblue   

23! bless him x

 

I'll mention that to my son's nursery, coolblue, see if it makes a difference with them. Unfortunately, my son doesn't do 'story time' at home, he's just not interested but he has started to come round to it in nursery. It's all trial and error i suppose :)

 

When he rocks back n forth, he has a habit of shaking his hands/wrists. I know he is too young to get him to understand things, I mean my local village knows him and they take no notice, if he has a tic moment in public but imagine as he gets older and he's not in his home town, it could cause him undue stress :(

 

I suppose I over think things!

 

Ah, that will be the age difference. Ds was nine when we tried the moving-around-while-listening strategy. Also, I wouldn't worry too much about the rocking. When I was an infant teacher (mainstream), almost all the children used to have some sort of 'tic' or other. As their sensory skills develop the need to move about diminishes. I'd try as much physical activity as you can manage with your lad at his age.

 

cb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a swing seat in the garden (on our third one) which gets used for very gentle rocking early in the morning and when my son comes home from school, even in the snow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BethK   

I don't think my son ever runs out of energy :lol: he's a houdini too, the amount of times he's been up and over our neighbour's garden wall (4ft high), I can't count on my hands of feet :huh:

 

So, at his age (3 and a half), is it best just to let him get on with it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sesley   

mine at 11 when excited jumps up and down,particularly when watching a tv program. He also walks on the balls of his feet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BethK   

mine at 11 when excited jumps up and down,particularly when watching a tv program. He also walks on the balls of his feet

 

 

yeah, my son does the tiptoe walk, all the time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think my son ever runs out of energy :lol: he's a houdini too, the amount of times he's been up and over our neighbour's garden wall (4ft high), I can't count on my hands of feet :huh:

 

So, at his age (3 and a half), is it best just to let him get on with it?

 

I built in opportunities for sensory input throughout the day. So a chance to bounce, some rolling up in duvets, a visit to softplay, and the thing he likes best, joint compressions, which make him melt. Best to have a bit of structure round it so that he's aware his needs will be met and he will, over time, be able to wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BethK   

He's currently using his bed as a trampoline, sometimes i wonder if he'd fall right through that ceiling :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×