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N1KK1

Small Head Circumference and ASD

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N1KK1   

Hi just had a appointment with Peditrican for our 3 year old son, and have been told that he has a small head circumference, it has grown a little but not a lot since his last appointment but its low down on the centials compared to his height and weight up on the 25th cential. He has got ASD and Hypermobility and was just wondering if anyone had come across this and if anyone had anymore information on it. They have said that they are going to continue to monitor it.

 

N1KK1

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Lyndalou   

Hi N1KK1

 

If anything, my son's head is probably a little bigger than average. I'm not sure if having a smaller head circumference would be classed as a typical ASD feature. I know there is some debate as to whether or not facial features can indicate autism; wide set and big eyes being a key feature but to be honest, I don't think this holds much water. I know that there can be a correlation between head size and certain conditions, for instance a little boy who goes to school with my son has a noticeably smaller head and his mum has told me this is directly associated with his cerebral palsy.

 

Lynda x

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justine1   

Like Lynda one of my boys,Dan(ASD) had a slightly large head at birth until about age 4,its a bit more average now (age 6)and in proportion with the rest of him...he is quite skinny.

 

Sam (ASD age 9) has always had an average size head and again in proportion to the rest of his growth.

 

However my 4 year old Eli has always had a large head,I was sent to various paediatricians' from age 2weeks-2months as it was growing rapidly and not in proportion or at the same rate as his weight and height. They believed he had hydrocephalus but could not see any other symptoms to suggest this and so he was discharged. He cannot wear his age hats he needs to wear teenage or small adult size. He also cannot wear certain t=shirts such as cowl necks as they awkward to put over his head. I usually buy him age 5-6 or 6 years clothing just because of his head,the rest of his body as "normal" size. He has no diagnosis but is being monitored by school etc as they told me at age 2 months and again age 2 years that he may very well have development problems.

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If it'is any help, I understand when I was born my skull structure caused concern what it was, I don't exactly know but all I know was I was put on calcium supplements to well sort my head out and thirty odd years later medics were kind of amazed at the thickness of my skull as I had a head x-ray following a trauma.

 

But I was in the military and because of that I was fitted with a respirator, which always leaked when doing CS drills and it was found the respirator was too big for me but usual male size respirators were too big for me and there is a few sizes and so I got fitted with a face welly that was meant for smaller headed female servicepersons.

 

So, maybe, oh and one final thing, part of my daily attire is a Australian leather bush hat and it is size Adult- small.

 

 

 

Edited to add, a quick search on the web displays a few studies have been conducted into head size and ASD with results posted.

Edited by Sa Skimrande

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I read a larger head is the sign of regressive autism, but I guess there are so many conflicting reports out there, but studies of head size in relation to abilities strikes me as some wandering back to old Eugenics ideas where it was supposed in the Victorian period small head sizes meant lower brain functions.

 

But if one wants some horror look up eugenics an offshoot of Darwinism and I believe first proposed by a relative of Charles Darwin who sought to use Eugenics as a means to diversify classes of people.

 

But students of Eugenics, just look who and where the theories were applied, some of which are still in use today.

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My boys heads were over the 90th centile. I think I read that the skull is thicker with asd.

 

Of which I know I have through an x- ray where medics commented on the thickness but it was supposed calcium deficiency as an infant necessitated supplement might have caused it, but if you have read somewhere autistics tend to have a thicker skull maybe it is that and not wild guesses at calcium supplementation ?

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