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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
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ceecee

Woman's own

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ceecee   

Just thought i'd let you all know in case anyone's interested.There's a rather sad story on the final pafe of woman's own this week.

 

It is about a child who when he was two and a half contracted encephalitus.It doesn't say how he got it.Whether it was through a vaccination or not like my daughter.It doesnt say.

 

It goes onto say the encephalitus left him with autism epilepsy and severe learning difficulties. :(

 

Unfortunately he never recovered and he is now fourteen and doing well at a boarding school.

 

It says in the article he wasin hospital for sixmonths but life was never to be the same again.

 

My daughter contracted encephalitus at four years old following the measels part of the mmr vaccination going into her brain.She too developed autism but within six months she was lucky enought o make a full recovery. :):)

 

What I cant understand is what makes one child recover and another not bearing in mind they were both toddlers.???

 

Any thought on this gratefully appreciated.

 

 

I was surprised at seeing this article as from what i have been given to understand whilst encephalitus is not as rare as one would imagine.Autistic encephalitus is very rare.

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ameretto   

CeeCee,

 

I have no idea about what may have caused the difference in outcomes, but i am pleased that you and your daughter have been so lucky in terms of recovery.

 

I will certainly try to find the magazine and read the article.

 

The problem, i think, with rare conditions is that, because of their rarity, they get less publicity and so it is harder for parents to contact others in similar situations. It also means that the rest of us are uninformed and have poor awareness of these conditions.

 

It might have been the rarity of the condition that persuaded the magazine to publish the story?

Maybe there could be an opportunity for you to raise awareness by approaching magazines with your own story? Of course that entirely depends on how you feel about privacy.

 

Natasha

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ceecee   

Natasha

 

Unfortunately I am unable to do this.I do not wish my father to have any knowledge of myself or my children.He has many difficulties and is not someone who I would wish my children to have any contact with.

 

I think it is an excellent idea to promote awareness of these rare conditions but unfortunately because of my circumstances and the need to remain anonymous to a certain extent I have never gone to the newspapers or magazines.

 

I wish i could because it would help others and also show what happens when the mmr booster vaccination doesn't suit the person it wwas given to.

 

It was certainly a though provoking article for me and well worth a read.

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LizK   

I suppose with any brain infection how it affects the person is variable and sadly in some respects luck of the draw. Take meningitis, some children recover completely, some are left with short term disabilites, some with longer lasting disablilities and some sadly die :( Maybe not the best analogy as bacterial meningitis is treatable with antibiotics but you tend to see a similar spread of outcomes with viral meningitis, just with a lower long term morbidity and mortality rate

 

There are lots of variables. This child might have had a infection that caused the encephalitis, it would depend on which part of the brain was affected and how severely it was affected, also on the resilience of the brain tissue and ability to regenerate. Also a lot of children with generalised brain damage exhibit autistic symptoms without having primary autism if that makes sense

 

Liz x

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Tensing   

I saw a website just the other day asking for peoples stories for the top women's magazines, you just had to fill in the basic details and then they phone you to get the more in depth story, I'll try and find it.

 

edited to add link, here you go.

 

http://www.money4yourstory.co.uk/

Edited by Tensing

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Tally   

ceecee, magazines often use actors to pose for photos and use false names in this type of article. If you explained the need for anonymity, they may well still be interested in your daughter's story.

 

You might also write a letter to the magazine. Most don't publish letters from anonymous senders, but you can request that your name be withheld from publication.

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ceecee   

Really I didn't realise this Tally it might be worth looking into further in that case.I have always held back before to protect my children from my father who is not someone we wish to have any contact with. :(

 

Thanks for the advice.it's appreciated. :thumbs:

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