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What do you think of paid employment?


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#1 Mike_GX101

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:19 AM

Are you working at the moment?

What do you think of paid employment?

Have you found your ideal career yet?

#2 Aeolienne

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 11:14 AM

1. No
2. I tend towards the view that as we spend the majority of our waking hours at work, it should be both possible and desirable to find something rewarding in more than just the financial sense.
3. No

#3 Shnoing

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

Yes.

Works for me.

I think so.

#4 Lyndalou

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:34 PM

Full time mum

Getting paid for a job well done is very satisfying

No

#5 Merry

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:20 PM

I used to work with children, and I knew I found work a struggle but thought I was very good at it even though it took so much mental energy. Looking back, I now don't believe I was very good at it. I never kept a job for more than 6 months to 2 years, all my supervisors thought I was slow working and slow to pick things up, and generally difficult to manage. I've been told many times that people at work don't like me because I'm "too nice" and I forget social/professional boundaries, like being too friendly with parents and often misunderstanding social situations with colleagues. When I was the supervisor/deputy manager, I had a really unrealistic view of how well I was keeping everything together. Although the children and parents always liked me and said I was approachable/smiley. And I think it was because it showed that I enjoyed my job a huge amount, just couldn't work with adults very well. Used to have evening jobs in the past, and particularly enjoyed bar work. Then a couple of years ago I realized that the jobs didn't go wrong all the time because of other people, it was because of me and i saw patterns in my life which led me to the mental health team and the diagnosis. I don't think I would go back to working with children because just enjoying your work isn't enough - you have to be good at it also. So although I always worked full time from the age of 16, I am now a full time mum. Might go back to part time bar work soon though. It involves little socializing actually, nothing complicated. Haven't found the ideal career for me.
I think paid employment is one of the most important foundations of society when everything's working well. It's like the police. Or the army...it makes you feel safe. It's how you know everything's secure, dependable, predictable. It gives routine, and used to allow people to save and plan for the future. Working full time used to mean you could have the odd luxury and have money for things other than just food rent and bills. Growing up, that's what I saw and I assumed things would always be that way. I thought all adults went to work. I would like my daughter to grow up with the same sense of security, seeing her parents working to provide for her and keep her safe. I can't give her exactly what I had. But she has a lot of time from both parents which must be positive. I don't feel very secure in the world as it is now. It doesn't feel predictable. The world really is not what I thought it was.

#6 robert7111a

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:14 AM

Yes

Has kept me in cameras/lenses and has helped me enormously with some social skills

My dream of an ideal career was quoshed when I was 18 but I'm in a job that I really enjoy

Never been on the dole...yet...I'm waiting for the grim reaper...

#7 positive_about

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 04:51 PM

1. No.
2. Would do anything for a good, and well paid, job right now. Looking to volunteer in the meantime and build up confidence and develop my poor social skills.
3. No. Had 7 years in electronics, 7 in telecoms/IT, special interest related. A career as an Autism/Asperger counsellor is appealling, but i'm not in the right place atm.

#8 Seeto200

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 10:57 PM

Are you working at the moment?

What do you think of paid employment?

Have you found your ideal career yet?

 

1. Yes I work full time as Technical Solutions Analyst

2. I especially love the getting paid bit

3. Yes, I work in the a small consultancy which means I get to travel alot and I mainly work alone  :)



#9 Tanya52

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 02:33 PM

A few of my former managers told me that I excelled at my jobs, very different jobs indeed. For me the paramount importance isnt a financial element, sorry. I need to know that my job is a valuable contribution to the society, no matter how low its prestige. My credo is "personal creativity is the core of any job".
Working p/t + doing post grad degree p/t
Paid employment proved to be very hard & can drain AS till you get ill
Id like to keep my current job + build up my freelancing career

#10 indiscreet

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:52 PM

Are you working at the moment?

What do you think of paid employment?

Have you found your ideal career yet?

1. Retired.

 

2. Wouldn't have considered any other - how else would I have survived?

 

3. I never did.


Edited by indiscreet, 16 September 2013 - 12:54 PM.


#11 Aeolienne

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 08:10 PM

I'm working at the moment - I'm midway through a six-month placement with an investment bank. Unfortunately it's really boring. Quite apart from the fact that it offers virtually no outlet for my environmental interests, all too often I'm at a loose end with nothing to do - while all around me my colleagues are working ridiculous hours and are allegedly too busy to pass on much work to me. I've been trying to look for work for when the placement ends, but I've been frustrated by being unable to explain to prospective employers what exactly I'm doing in my current job.



#12 Aeolienne

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Posted 22 September 2014 - 07:46 AM

The placement at the investment bank ended in mid-August without my having secured a job for afterwards. Towards the end I was invited to give a PowerPoint presentation on "Future recommendations for Autism Work Placement Programme" which I did, albeit to very small audience consisting mostly of my colleagues. They seemed impressed and said that my recommendations would definitely be of use to other hiring managers. Considering that this said programme has been running for over a decade, I am surprised that the powers that be needed to be told that I would have benefitted from a structured placement with regular 1-2-1 meetings with my line manager and mentoring. Am I to believe that I was the only candidate in the entire history of the scheme who desired such things?

 

Mind you, this points to something I've noticed before. Most if not all the standard recommendations for managing autistic-spectrum employees boil down to good working practice - in other words they would benefit NT workers too. Yet when we ask for them we're accused of wanting special treatment! Go figure.



#13 dotmarsdotcom

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 12:36 AM

hi ben,

 

1) we all know you did nothing wrong.

 

2) the reason why no one liked you was because they were threatened by you.

 

3) you revealed yourself and showed too much genuineness, and hence basically exposed your jugular for them to rip.

 

you in no way did anything wrong.

 

you just didn't realise situational stuff.

 

i.e. they had mortgages and car payments just like you. but if it was them or you.... THEY CHOSE THEM,

 

you were too nice,

 

so from the world go.. they all had kids to feed too?

 

so it was a case of you or their kids?.. of course they chose their kids?

 

there's nothing you did wrong at all,

 

just don't be nice! jobs a job. just do it for the money, and be the best you can be.

 

re: the paid income question...

 

I'd need to know what you originally meant?

 

the older i get the less money means to me.

 

I could see myself doing a job, that just paid me food & subsistence, because money means nothing to me & i don't need it anymore,

 

it's hard to get into that sort of situation though?

 

I guess it depends what your circumstances are, and who you need to provide for?

 

good luck



#14 dotmarsdotcom

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 12:58 AM

there must be something wrong with this site.

 

i join a thread that has only four replies, and by the time I've posted, another 8 replies appear,

 

(which were posted before me err????)

 

1984? Winston? ministry of truth? haha?

 

or maybe a site that hasn't recently been flushed?

 

i sort of get this site is under populated.. so probably the nice guy who hosts it, if he thinks no ones interested, he won't maintain it

 

but the messages getting inserted post after the fact? that's not sustainable.

 

but i get the site owners point of view. he'll be thinking, "if it wasn't for me the site wouldn't be here" so what.. i'll do as i wish, and what ever!

 

:-(



#15 Aeolienne

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 08:41 AM

hi ben,

 

1) we all know you did nothing wrong.

 

2) the reason why no one liked you was because they were threatened by you.

 

3) you revealed yourself and showed too much genuineness, and hence basically exposed your jugular for them to rip.

 

you in no way did anything wrong.

 

you just didn't realise situational stuff.

 

i.e. they had mortgages and car payments just like you. but if it was them or you.... THEY CHOSE THEM,

 

you were too nice,

 

so from the world go.. they all had kids to feed too?

 

so it was a case of you or their kids?.. of course they chose their kids?

 

there's nothing you did wrong at all,

 

just don't be nice! job's a job. just do it for the money, and be the best you can be.

 

re: the paid income question...

 

I'd need to know what you originally meant?

 

the older i get the less money means to me.

 

I could see myself doing a job, that just paid me food & subsistence, because money means nothing to me & i don't need it anymore,

 

it's hard to get into that sort of situation though?

 

I guess it depends what your circumstances are, and who you need to provide for?

 

good luck

Ben who? Is this reply in the wrong thread?



#16 dotmarsdotcom

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 11:14 PM

my bad.

 

due to being new, I'd misunderstood the sites ways of showing threads.

 

on that night, things looked a bit weird and freaked me out,

 

but I see now, it was my incorrect reading of the site, so no problem

 

:-)



#17 Titan

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 03:24 PM

[quotim name="Miemployment post="341687" timestamp="1361611176"]Are you working at the moment?

What do you think of paid employment?

Have youpoverty Hinkseyr ideal career yet?[/quote]

1 No Im not work
2 I think paid employment is a fine theory but in practice holds no real value unless you are very well paid and can lift yourself out of the poverty trap thats set for the low paid that they cant work themselves out off.
3 No and never will.

#18 dotmarsdotcom

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 12:34 AM

my last post for tonight.

 

i'm getting on a bit.. i'm not a young guy no more.

 

...and i've always been lucky re: earning money. etc.

 

and I've always tried to never use that money for myself... I've always spent it on trying to help other's.

 

i'm pretty cool with working with people who need a helping hand.. and i love offering said helping hand.

 

but what I have learnt though, is folks are scared.

 

they've been so bullied into submission, even if a genuine person comes up and goes,

 

saying "what do you want? tell me your ideas? i'll put in money to get you going on it,"

 

they have been protected by their mum's.. they have been trained to fail, usually by their mum?

 

it's usually their mum who keeps them in safety... and their mum who keeps them trapped?

 

and once that happens.. that poor kid will never have a chance of success. that kid's life is over.

 

life is not about safety. life is risks. I think there is sometimes such a thing as overcompensation.

 

(and also the mum using the kid to justify her life choices?

 

i.e. your my kid. be like me... sob :-(

 

at point it's no longer about the kid.. it's about the mum needing someone to be with. and she picked her kid :-(



#19 Aeolienne

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:09 PM



Most if not all the standard recommendations for managing autistic-spectrum employees boil down to good working practice - in other words they would benefit NT workers too. Yet when we ask for them we're accused of wanting special treatment! Go figure.

Take this for instance: How to make your employees love you from day one



#20 Shnoing

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 06:13 PM

Yes.

Works for me.

I think so.

It's2 years later now. Still, yes.






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