Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Kris

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team

Recommended Posts

Yesterday, when surfing YouTube I found a video with a man who was diagnosed with Autism when he was a toddler.

 

He claimed that his mother was told that he would never live independently and at best only speak a few words.

 

However his mum refused to believe that he would be unable to live a normal life, and so put in in mainstream school, which I will add was in the early 1980s.

 

Now he is a CEO and has written a book called Am I Still Autistic?

 

This made me wonder about my own diagnoses's as a child in the early to mid 1990s.

 

Back then I was diagnosed with what was then called 'High Functioning Autism', as back then I used to have a hot temper (when things didn't go my way) have wild flights of fancy (more on that later) and when I was about two or three I stopped talking, only to begin again (slowly over time) when I was about four or five, although I was still fully aware of my surroundings, albeit as best a toddler can be at that age.

 

I also had issues with being touched and the all time classic, clothing tags (thus I would often play in the nude) although this later disappeared when I was six years old.

 

Thus I was sent to an 'Autistic school' which although I hated as there were so many Classic Autistic pupils there, thus the funds and attention was put (for the most part) on them, however I made a number of close friends (both among the staff and the higher functioning pupils) there and so have one or two fond memories of my time there, if only for the people rather than what went on there (barring perhaps the year we went to summer camp, which was wonderful, but that's another story).

 

One teacher, or maybe in was one of the care staff (I don't know which) wrote in my yearly report that I may have been misdiagnosed and that I may have Aspergers Syndrome.

 

Thus, I was briefly reassessed, and although I remember little of what happened regarding this, I still remember to this day being told that I in fact had AS not HFA, which I must confess made me feel a little important.

 

Since those heady days it would seem that I have outgrown many of my original traits, firstly I can talk (although that said I could at the time I was diagnosed) secondly I don't run about in the nude (it still had an appeal for me for quite some time until my late teens) thirdly I don't have anywhere near as short the temper I had back when I was a kid.

 

Lastly I don't confuse fact with fiction the way I did when I was a kid (although I do often consider a great many situations, which while they are possible, don't often happen) as back then I used to tell tall tales about my adventures and come up with madcap plans (like most small boys do) but, I would also believe that they happened and that they would work.

 

Granted this could be put down to growing up, but I have seen a number of other ASD adults, who haven't matured at all! And I don't mean those with 'classic' Autism.

 

Please do not think that I believe that Autism, can just 'disappear' for as far as I'm aware, it doesn't.

 

What I am asking is, have any of you out there, outgrown your 'original' traits?

 

Or if you were diagnosed earlier in life would you have a more 'severe' diagnoses's?

 

Or even if you were taken up for assessment now, would you even be diagnosed now?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There no such thing as grow out of autism.

 

U do however grow to live with autism and cope with it better.msome days I have bad days but I don't want to rid my autism or I won't be me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oxgirl   

Reading back through my son's school annual review reports and statement reports I would not recognise him as the person he is today. He has none of the traits that he had as a child, but I guess he has different problems, adults problems with fitting into the adult world. I don't think he would get a dx now, would rather just be seen as shy and withdrawn. He is so much more aware of himself and his behaviour and how they appear to others and understands so much more of the world and is more aware of others, that I guess he has just learnt to 'cope' better in a lot of ways. He is still autistic but just presents differently I think. Interesting.

 

~ Mel ~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
verbeia   

I'd agree with those above, autism spectrum conditions are considered to be neurological, and not something you can grow out of - however, your coping mechanisms to deal with social or communication difficulties relating to the condition can change or improve, and you may not outwardly show signs of autism any more. In the case of some of us (suspected in my case!) we get so practised at learning the expected social conduct and responses that hardly anyone would notice - but this can also result having to live behind a mask permanently, whether consciously or not. I'm sure I've heard before of a classification of 'childhood autism', but I'm not sure if this is given because it's seen as too early to give a diagnosis of a lifelong condition because the person is too young or it's unclear. Some behaviours in young children could be misinterpreted as autism, and maybe this diagnosis is given when it's unclear?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mihaela   

I'd agree with the previous comments. We cannot grow out of it - however much Autism Speaks imagines that we can! We can better adapt to it by developing new coping strategies and our sensory processing sensitivities can vary over time. Often, our lives can become a lot harder over time due to losing our support networks, e.g. when we become too old for CAMHS support, when we leave home and attempt to build our own independent lives or when our parents die or become ill. This is when it really hits us.

 

I was always very shy and introverted, but thanks to my high intelligence, I did eventually manage to imitate NT behaviour sufficiently well to hide most of my Aspie traits, at least most of the time. I was known for my polymathic-philomathic traits and these masked my true (autistic) identity - even I was fooled! High intelligence can work to our disadvantage, and I now believe this imitating game to be a bad thing, and feel we should be ourselves and follow our consciences regardless of how the NT world sees us. Being ourselves is far less stressful than having to act out a false role, but we can only do that if we thoroughly understand our true selves, and often this doesn't happen for decades, if ever. I agree there are practicalities to consider here though - not least coping in a work situation.

 

I find that the sensory issues so closely connected with autism are far more subject to change than our social difficulties, and I've no idea what causes these changes - possibly traumas. If anything my sensory sensitivities are more acute than they've ever been. Of course, they vary with anxiety levels, but even when taking that into account, they've still generally increased. This applies equally to my physical, aesthetic and emotional sensitivities.

SteveR - You spoke of growing out of childhood sensory issues caused by wearing clothes. I never had strong issues in that area, but my brother did, and he was almost certainly on the spectrum, although very different to myself. I would have been too shy to run about naked as a child, but I now know that this was due to society's warped attitude towards nudity and that nudity is natural, healthy and good - especially for children. A couple of random examples of my changing sensitivities: I disliked the feel of velvet or the taste of vinegar, but I completely outgrew these during my teens, yet I still can't stomach strong tea or tea with milk... As for coping with bright lights, flourescent lights, bright sun, loud noise, sudden noises, traffic, crowds, supermarkets, etc. my thresholds have reduced a lot since then - probably because I'm more often alone than I was. When in towns I sometimes feel like a nervous wreck. :(

Verbeia - Childhood Autism (F84.0) is the ICD-10's name for 'classic' autism (or 'typical' autism) of the so-called low-functioning type. It is diagnosed in early childhood using standard tests aimed at differentiating it from learning disability. The DSM-IV called it Autistic Disorder, and the DSM5 has lumped everything together (including Asperger's syndrome) under Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Diagnostic labelling in this area is a total mess!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember being told very often as a child by doctors that I would 'grow out of it'

 

this is an addition the comments on another post about 'middle child syndrome'

 

neither of these don't exist. if the doctors were autistic they would have said clearly, 'I don't know what this is, let me do some research'

 

however they are not, and use ambiguous words and paraphrases to basically hide the fact they don't know

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so I agree with what you say about learning to adapt

 

However trying to appear normal does tire... Or at least did tire me out something chronic. It has been part of a lot of my discussions here since joining.

 

I would imagine that you would prefer not to have to hide being a traveller, the same I feel applies to autistic traits. I am now concentrating on being myself and 'proud' just as im sure you are about your heritage.

 

I hope one day we don't have to try or pretend to be like everyone else, for indivuality is encouraged in this modern world is it not?

 

Good luck on your journey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I need a name change, as I'm stuck in a house now when life was much easier on the road. It was only a 2½ year break from being relatively boring and conventional (in a slightly alternative way!), mostly staying on Caravan Club sites and the like, so not a "proper" traveller!

 

I'm currently going through a bit of a meltdown from decades of putting on an act though, made worse by being several months into the wait for a diagnosis!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Livelife   

In my opinion you do not ever stop being Autistic but as you get older you learn how to fit in a little better which can give the impression that maybe you can overcome it.

Then you need to consider the individual as a child everyone is different so some will appear better because they had less challenges than others had.

Even when you do something because you see its what's done or excepted it doesn't mean that you have a full understanding of what your doing or why its done.

For those people who wish to hide the condition and are not as effected as some its possible to appear that you may have grown out of the condition but in reality its coping mechanisms that have been developed and employed to create this person without Autism.

The fact is there is no cure otherwise it would be known and available and people would then be able to be cured if that's the way some people like to see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't worry confused traveller, nobody here is prejudice. Its not about the name or the face its about what's in your mind and your heart.

 

I think the most important thing to remember about both points is be true to yourself.

 

See my post 'aspie NT symbiosis' it contains the motivational thoughts I've colated to keep me going whilst struggling for adult diagnosis

 

Hope it helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Livelife   

I would also like to add that a diagnosis has helped me understand myself a little better and it's a relief to have the answers to a lot of questions that I have had all my life.

There are advantages and disadvantages of having the official diagnosis but it's not going to necessarily be the answer anyone is looking for, I thought things would be better and life would somehow be easier I couldn't say how I just believed it would.

Nothing changed except the fact somebody told me what I already knew, there are services that your able to attain with the diagnosis but in my area at least being entitled is one thing actually becoming a reality is another.

It's Important to develop your own way of coping with life it's what you need and require what's important and you can implement this into your life at any time if it's going to make things easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you livelife. This is what im looking for with official diagnosis. Understanding of myself and a black and white answer for people around me.

 

I am hoping afterwards to make the most of help available so I can get back into work with understanding and accepting employers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Livelife   

I agree with you livelife. This is what im looking for with official diagnosis. Understanding of myself and a black and white answer for people around me.

I am hoping afterwards to make the most of help available so I can get back into work with understanding and accepting employers

Help especially regarding work can be more unhelpful than you would think, I'm biased on this subject I realise that but until I'm proved wrong I don't believe employers want autistic people on their workforce.

I did a job for years then as soon as I was diagnosed I was incapable and now I have to have authorisation from my doctor when a company contacts them to prove I am safe to work there. Apparently because I am autistic I can't be trusted to manage my diabetes in case I have a hypo. That's how we are perceived just unable to manage I have no trust or faith in employers or those that think they know how we should live.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear about your experiences. I have all this to come.

 

Shocking to need doctors note for work, as if being socially disfuncionate means you can't manage your diabetes?!

 

So what if we don't get jokes and chit chat? You know if you need to test, and know what the numbers mean! I'm sure you could probably explain the details of both conditions to them and they simply wouldn't understand. How is this our disability? See my signiature comments. Their intelligence is not high enough to comprehend the situation, they just imagine those amoung us who are most troubled and think the worst.

 

Surely there are people who claim to be equal opportunities employers?

 

Even though we are comfortable about the term 'autistic spectrum' NT's seem to have a narrow minded view of the term autism. Do they not realise that asperger means high intelligence low social skill?

 

Does that not make us worthwhile staff??

 

New ideas, excellent logic and mental processing skills and no time wasted chit chatting?!

 

Surely that makes us prime?

 

There are services to get austistic people into work no?

 

I have a link somewhere...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Livelife   

I think that's part of the problem but I haven't worked why it's a issue for them, when I explain the conditions in detail they seem to become more concerned the more information I provide.

Nobody can claim to know everything but I know enough about diabetes to control it and deal with hypos when or if they happen. I'm not prone to them because I'm not on medication do its not as if I am a high risk it's just a possibility.

When I do exercise or long walks I can get a low sugar reading but that's normal and you can eat a little that brings it up all manageable and normal practice.

I have a reasonable understanding of autism but admit knowing and dealing with something during a meltdown can be a problem when too many things are going on I don't always think as logical as I usually do.

That said proper planning and thought they can be avoided also and I manage well or at least I believe I do and there are no instances to prove otherwise.

It's possible they conclude a meltdown will prevent me from being responsible but personally I don't believe it's logical to assume it, if it had happened or there was proof of not being capable then I would concede the point.

It has not happened my entire working life so I don't agree or will ever be persuaded otherwise.

There are people who help us find work and it was this person who told me I would need to get this plan from my Doctor enabling me to work when the company contacts her.

Employment law apparently but hopefully this will be something you won't have to deal with as your not diabetic so won't be relevant to your personal circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×