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rocketgob

Signs of gluten & casein problems?

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Hi all

 

My DS is 3 - will be 4 in December and has always had poo problems - its very smelly & runny all the time and we usually have a dirty nappy at least 3 times a day and now he has started doing it in the night as well. I have seen the GP as Charlie used to have a milk problem (soya fed til 12 months) and he said now it is due to the large volumes of milk he was drinking his bowels cant cope with the lactose. I have reduced his milk right down - he has 2 cups a day now and rarely has yoghurt, will not touch cheese and he still has the runny poo. I am now wondering whether this could be a gluten problem maybe?

 

Has anyone had experience of this sort of thing?

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Hello, my son who is 14 has bowel problems still and was tested by the autism research team who said he would benefit from a gluten free diet but the dietian and Doc disagreed and thought as he was a fussy eater any way it would limit his diet even more-and TBH I agree.

 

Does you son get anxious a lot (is this a silly question) I put my sons bowel problems down to high levels of anxiety-like irritable bowel syndrome? Does your son get windy as well?

 

When my son was younger I use to massage his stomach which really helped (remember only clockwise or up/down or you push the poo back). Hope this helps X

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Nic m   

Hi Rocketgob,

 

My daughter has always had difficulty going to the toilet, and it was the opposite problem .........chronic constipation, but along with that came the dark smelly leakage!!!!!!!!!!!

 

She now no longer requires medicine (she was on it for 7 years).

A mixture of things were the cause of her difficulties, stress, hyper mobility, and an intolerance/ allergy to sodium benzoate.

 

Good luck.

 

N x

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Sooze2   
Hi all

 

My DS is 3 - will be 4 in December and has always had poo problems - its very smelly & runny all the time and we usually have a dirty nappy at least 3 times a day and now he has started doing it in the night as well. I have seen the GP as Charlie used to have a milk problem (soya fed til 12 months) and he said now it is due to the large volumes of milk he was drinking his bowels cant cope with the lactose. I have reduced his milk right down - he has 2 cups a day now and rarely has yoghurt, will not touch cheese and he still has the runny poo. I am now wondering whether this could be a gluten problem maybe?

 

Has anyone had experience of this sort of thing?

 

I was just wondering - when you say he only has 2 cups of milk now is that Soya milk or cows? My twins are milk protien intolerant and when they were 3 if so much as a spoon of yoguhurt of milk passed their lips they would have very bad diaoreah! There is milk hidden in biscuits, soups, cold meat and nearly all frozen pies and chicken nuggets etc - all sorts of every day foods. These little hidden whey powders and things were enough to give them an upset tummy. They eat a huge amount of fruit and veg which never gives them a tummy upset but give them milk and let the trouser explosions commence.

 

Their poo was always very smelly, separating, mucusy and vile when they had any form of milk. It proved almost impossible to potty train them because they pooed so many times a day and they couldn't hold it.

 

You can ask your doctor to do a blood test to see if he is alergic to lactose, mine are not, it's the milk protein they can't have apparently!

 

You could cut out every tiny bit of milk from his diet and just give soya milk, soya yogurt and check all labels for whey powder, lactose, etc be very strict for a couple of weeks and see what happens. If that doesn't work try cutting out the soya for a couple of weeks aswell because some people can be intolerant to that. Then slowly introduce a tiny bit of one food and see what happens. I would have to wait for a few days after introducing a food so see the effects such as squits then rash on the checks.

 

Hope this helps a bit anyway.

Edited by Sooze2

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trekster   
Hello, my son who is 14 has bowel problems still and was tested by the autism research team who said he would benefit from a gluten free diet but the dietian and Doc disagreed and thought as he was a fussy eater any way it would limit his diet even more-and TBH I agree.

 

Does you son get anxious a lot (is this a silly question) I put my sons bowel problems down to high levels of anxiety-like irritable bowel syndrome? Does your son get windy as well?

 

When my son was younger I use to massage his stomach which really helped (remember only clockwise or up/down or you push the poo back). Hope this helps X

 

He is getting a high from his food choices if they are predominantly gluten and dairy containing. i studied selective eating as a part of my paper "diet and autism: is there a link?" Nothing except changing my diet helped with constipation which used to be constant and severe. Now i rarely get it.

 

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bettyhen   

Lots of poo experience here. I would cut out the milk products entirely for a week and see if things change before doing anything else. That should easily be long enough to judge. My son's BMs were foul with milk and still are if he has something that affects him. The gluten affected his mood rather than his BMs.

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Echo what people here have said about minuscule amounts of milk having an effect. Think you should cut it out entirely for a week and see. Our smelly poos cleared up almost overnight.

 

Gluten was more attention span and hyperactivity, if my reading of infringements is right.

 

 

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trekster   

Hello

 

With me milk causes the brain issues and gluten causes the bowel issues

 

Alexis

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A and A   

Hi there we have a 3 year old son who was diagnosed with asd in october 09 and he is due to start a specialised nursery for children with a range of disabilities. He is going from 9am till 3pm one day a week so will need to take a pack lunch with him,can anyone give me any ideas of what to put in his pack lunch that is gluten and dairy free.

A and A

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Tally   

I find small portions of hot meals are easier to do than cold foods. Would they re-heat your son's meals in a microwave?

 

There are some very good new GF breads available now, which might be good for sandwiches. I find them a bit dry, but a filling with mayonnaise might help.

 

I've seen GF crackers in supermarkets, or there are corn crispbreads or ricecakes which might be nice with pate on. If they go soggy you could try them with a dip instead of spread.

 

If you can't get anything carb-based into him at nursery, anything high in fibre should keep him going for a while. Fruit or vegetables with the skin on would be particularly good. If he's not keen on the skin of things like apples, carrots or cucumber, you can peel them roughly, leaving some behind.

 

Grapes or pepper and celery sticks.

Cold rice, potato or (GF)pasta salads.

Hard boiled egg.

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baddad   

My son took packed lunches all through primary school... Most days his lunch was based around an 'antionette saville' (available from waitrose or you can look online for local stockists) bread roll with some sort of filling... I found them to be the best option then, as if 'pinged' in the microwave in the morning for 30 seconds they would stay soft all day. Now, though, I'd probably go with either 'genius' bread or 'Mrs Crimbles' and make sarnies. The first is available in tesco's and i noticed today it's just crept into my local waitrose. Mrs Crimbles is on the FF shelf of most Sainsburys. As someone who used to bake all bread from scratch because the shop bought options weren't up to much I can strongly recommend both as far better than anything i could make myself. Ditto the antionette saville rolls - though genius bread leaves them standing. Warmer weather makes life easier, 'cos tupperware full of salad (with chicken, or ham, etc) or chilled pasta/rice dishes offer variety from rolls/sarnies, but in either case I'd also pack stuff like dried fruits, crudite (carrot or celery sticks, cucumber etc), maybe some snack (rice) 'crackers' or crisps, along with fresh fruit (nanas and apples unless you fancy citrus stained uniform!) and some sort of treat like a small home made cake or biscuit...

TBH there's not much that you could put in an 'average' packed lunch that you can't find or make a gf/df alternative to these days (apart from cheese strings which I know appear in many kids packed lunches but are pretty awful for ANY kid if you look at the ingredients) - you just have to know where to find it and/or how to make it yourself.

One other factor, of course, is the kid him/herself and willingness to try new things/accept alternatives - but then if you've already made the switch to DF/GF and elected to go for a packed lunch rather than 'school dinner', that's a bridge you've already made the decision to cross, iykwim.

That said, many schools now use outside or centralised catering, and can offer gf/df cooked meals if you ask(?) One thing to be wary of (but I'm guessing this isn't a factor with your littlun being so young?) is that some kids refuse to eat school dinners but then won't eat a decent packed lunch either and end up guilt-tripping parents into filling a lunchbox with processed rubbish. The truth is that a child can dig in his/her heels and go from breakfast to three o'clock without eating if they are rewarded at three o'clock with open access to the biscuit tin or whatever... that kind of thing should never be automatically assumed as 'taste/texture sensitivity' or whatever, because in all but a tiny minority the reality is far simpler and far more in line with perfectly normal controlling behaviour which all small children will practice if enabled to do so.

 

Hope that's helpful

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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trekster   
Hi there we have a 3 year old son who was diagnosed with asd in October 09 and he is due to start a specialised nursery for children with a range of disabilities. He is going from 9am till 3pm one day a week so will need to take a pack lunch with him, can anyone give me any ideas of what to put in his pack lunch that is gluten and dairy free.

A and A

 

"User guide to gfcf diet for autism/aspergers and ADHD" by Luke Jackson includes some ideas for suitable packed lunches.

 

Alexis

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Hi,

 

I bought a mug design of small flask which has a wide neck - from the high street outdoor shops for about a tenner. http://www.millets.co.uk/product/090977.html

 

I can make my son any hot lunch, pasta, stew, chilli mixed with rice, beans and sausage or a 'thick' soup and it will stay hot for lunchtime. The trick is not to microwave the food but cook on the hob, then it stays hot for longer. Pack a small bowl and a spoon, and a nappy sack for dirty plates.

 

Bit of a faff in the morning, but at least you are providing a good hot meat.

 

Other easy meals are raw veg and dips, cold pasta with tuna and salad.

 

Lynn

Edited by jaffacakes

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baddad   

Shopping in Sainsbury's today and found no less than FOUR DF/GF easter eggs in their FF section! :thumbs:

There were the usual Kinnerton ones ( the Bart Simpson one that's been around for a few years and the same egg but packaged with winnie the pooh for younger kids that came out last year) with the jelly sweets but also a sainsbury's 'luxury' one (a bit expensive) and a new rather nice looking 'Choices' one that has six foil wrapped chocolate 'discs' as well as the egg.

 

So far not seen any in Tesco's - not even the Kinnerton ones. :(

 

Unfortunately, Ben spotted the one I bought him this morning while he had his golf lesson, so the element of surprise has gone, but he said 'Well I knew I'd get an egg anyway so it doesn't matter' :angry:

I gave him a huge lecture about Easter not just being a chocolate egg fest, but he's of an age now where such theological interpretations are best avoided :whistle:

Anyhoo - hope the above is useful

 

L&P

 

BD :D

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trekster   

hello

 

If he has a milk addiction then reducing the milk wont be enough. i am addicted to both gluten and dairy products. Also i have problems with msg, aspartame and pineapple or bromelain (the latter 2 due to the HMS).

 

Milk would take a few days to totally get out of his system. Gluten would take months.

 

Dietary intervention isn't supported by mainstream medicine. Also I haven't found anything isn't permitted under gf/cf diet. i have found alternatives even with the extra parts such as the msg, aspartame and pineapple taken off. This year i had my 1st chocolate advent calendar in 7 years. Without dietary intervention i wouldn't be in my current living situation of having my own place (with support).

Edited by trekster

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well is your little one lactose intolerance or dairy? u can get lactofree cheese, lactofree cheese spread, lactofree milk, lactofree spread has just come out. but it may not be suitable if he has dairy intolerance which soya cheese is ok and the spread but dont get mozerralla version its disgusting.

 

you can buy rice cakes- kallo version

crisp bread crackers that is lovely to eat.

careful which ones u buy because some have 'milk' in.

 

you could make sandwiches using GF bread- ham, tuna, lactofree/soya cheese , salads

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Hi i am a new member, i live in kent with my son who is 3 diagnosed on spectrum in nov. my daughter is 8 months. i am embarking on this diet to see if it helps as i have read alot of hype and my son has other mild symptoms such as rash,upset stools ect. any tipe on basic recipe or bought ideas, i have purchased rice milk, genius bread, vegan cheese,yogs ect.

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Hi Kelly,

 

When your kids is extra sensitive, like kids with ASS tend to be (eventhough the opposite might also happen, as in overly sensitive too sound, though load and sometimes appearing deaf)

When oversensitive and overloaded bij senses.. the mean emotion is fear. Where does everybody feel fear? Right your stomack! Why.. for lack of blood.. which goes to your extremities to make a run for it! Thus the stomack isn't working optimaly!

 

Refined sugars, fatty fried stuff etc are difficult to proces than.. So there is definitly something to say for a diet!

 

Though the best 'diet' for any ASS person, is being aware which senses are being overstimulated and understimulated.. and with the help of an SI-therapist make a list what activity or rest is needed when! A sensory diet.. ;-) That will work miracles also.. for years to come, especially when going to school :D

 

Love to hear how things work out!

B'fly

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trekster   

Hi welcome to the site,

 

im a moderator on a yahoo recipies group which are gluten and dairy free, some of them are also egg or soya free as well.

PM me if you wish to join.

 

Dairy takes a few days to get out of the system, gluten takes longer sometimes months. i also avoid aspartame and MSG when i can. i recommend the 'special diets for special kids' cookbook and have found the pearsauce bread to be very tasty.

It will take a while for your kid to adjust to the new food.

 

Ive been following this lifestyle for about 7 years in May and without it i wouldnt have been able to move into my own supported living flat. Remember to also check the ingredients on non foodstuffs that you use on your kid.

 

i find gluten causes bowel symptoms and milk causes brain fog confusion.

 

HTH

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hce   

Hi, I too am embarking on this diet for my son but finding it a bit of a nightmare in knowing what is and isn't allowed! Is there a list somewhere on the web of products e.g. cheese substitutes, cooked meats, etc which are OK? My poor little boy will fade away soon without some help and advice for me on what to buy!

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Shnoing   

I'd say get him tested to see if that's really the problem. As soon as the diet is "working", the tests don't work any more and at some point you'll want to know what he really can eat, and what he cannot.

Advertising for named products or brands seem to be forbidden here, so if you want names, you'll have to pm someone.

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WillsDad   

Consider also the SCD/GAPS diet and using probiotics. The pecanbread website is popular for recipes. Some children seem to really respond to diets other not so much. My son's diet is basically vegatbles, meat, fruit, GFCF biscuits and a couple of supplements. His health has vastly improved but not sure how much of his ASD improvements are due to diet though.

All th best WillsDad

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trekster   

Welcome Kelley

 

I have been gf/cf/magf/asparatamef for sometime now. In fact about 6 years ago i turned my life around by changing my diet. i am also off pineapple for the HMS.

 

'Dietary interventions and ASD' is an excellent book aimed at parents like yourself.

Also 'Special diets for special kids' although americanised is possible to follow.

 

Im a moderator of a recipie forum based in the USA (i joined not realising they arent

part of the UK as an interim measure whilst i was waiting for my copy of 'the AIA

gf/cf cookbook' to arrive.

 

Good luck and i hope your child benefits from this intervention. Although it can be

called a 'diet' you really need to take other things out such as playdoh and toiletries.

Also check their medicatons or supplements if they are on any.

 

i recommend starting omega 3 oils if/when your child is old enough.

 

Personally the only real test of this intervention is to follow it strictly for a year.

Why waste money on tests when you can just try this intervention yourself?

Edited by trekster

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trekster   

Hi, I too am embarking on this diet for my son but finding it a bit of a nightmare in knowing what is and isn't allowed! Is there a list somewhere on the web of products e.g. cheese substitutes, cooked meats, etc which are OK? My poor little boy will fade away soon without some help and advice for me on what to buy!

 

'Dietary interventions and autism by rosemary keswick' should have the full list. Anything Vegan is free of milk.

i use the powdered cheese subs you find in the aisles, however it can take some time for your kiddos pallatte to adjust to the new stuff. At 1st some of the items tasted gross.

 

A welcome side effect is that i can eat garden peas after 5 years without gagging. Also the smell of coffee and malt no longer makes me feel sick.

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failri   

I have no idea about the egg are the best for gluten people . But I suggest Patterns of eating have changed drastically throughout the evolution of man. While our distant ancestors ate almost no gluten grains, one of the most common ways we now eat carbohydrates is in wheat. Gluten constitutes 78% of the total protein in modern
wheat.

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Pest123   

I notice Asda and Tesco are now selling this and it is corn based.

 

Has anyone tried it? Does it taste very different to regular couscous?

 

And does it taste of sweetcorn? I am not a fan of sweetcorn!

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trekster   

Quinoa is a useful substitute for couscous.

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