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peaches

Fiddle toys - school not impressed

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peaches   

I need to persuade school that the use of fiddle toys/sensory toys would be good for R. In class, if he is not touching and annoying others, he chews his clothes and makes a patch of eczema on his face whilst doing so. He is one of those kids who really likes to mouth things. When I have sent toys into school they have been sent back as he has been "messing about with them/throwing them about", or they have been confiscated. I dont think the teacher, the head or the SENCO understand the idea behind giving a sensory toy or soft toy and when and how to use it.

 

I wonder if someone could point me in the direction of some research or something written by someone clinical or otherwise qualified, to print off and send into school.

 

Also, tell me and show me your own strategies or props that you use for your child. I have had some useful tips from another forummer already.

 

Thanks again!

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tjw   

hi peaches

i am suprised that school do not allow your figet toys in school georges school alows him to take his into school he puts them on the teach desk and they will let him play with them if needed but he seems quite happy knowning they are there, has the head teach said a defo no to this, i would speak with her again and stress how they could help your dgs perhapes it will be enough for him just to no they are there if he does need them, good luck with this and do hope they let you take them in.

take care

theresa xx

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NickyB   

Hello peaches

 

I found this on the website of the Indiana Resource Center for Autism :

 

'Tactile Ideas

 

Experiment with types of clothing that are comfortable (i.e. terry cloth, all cotton, several times washed, no labels).

 

Provide easy access to small hand fidgets (i.e. squishy, soft, textured, soft).

 

Allow student to sit in a bean bag chair.

 

Refer to occupational therapist for further ideas (i.e. weighted vest, utensils, ?brushing?).'

 

I'm not sure if that's any use, but here's a link to their website: Link

 

>:D<<'>

 

 

 

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As an LSA, I know there are some children who can fiddle with an object but still listen, and there are some that fiddle but don't listen at the same time. You can soon tell.

 

There need to be rules on using the objects. Several children had a bit of blutack last year, but some would distract other children with their artistic creations or stick it to the carpet. They generally used it during carpet time, but it was taken away if they were silly with it (they were told the rules each time they were given it).

 

If the object is too interesting/noisy, it distracts other children.

 

Here are some ideas:

 

http://www.sensetoys.com/V2EMLDRNAK

 

I particularly like the textured beads and the textured tangle toy.

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peaches   

Thank you, the links are great. Im going to look in gift shops whilst we are away for things like koosh balls, tangle toys, stretchy things on keyrings etc, if not, I know Baker Ross sells stuff like that. I have tried to explain to the school at the last meeting why things like this are necessary but in the middle of a meeting I suddenly became inarticulate. The Ed Psych knew what I meant but the other staff didnt.

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if throwing the toys is a problem look out for something on one of those keychains with the rubber spiral. it can go in his trouser pocket and at least then its tied to him so noone else can mess with it and he can't throw it up in the air. some of them are handily hard to open the hook bit

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oxgirl   

When my lad was little he was very interested in bugs, he had loads of little plastic insect toys. He didn't used to be able to sit on the carpet at all, would become bored and noisy very quickly and couldn't sit in assembly for more than a minute before he'd start shouting, etc. I told the teacher one day that I'd never dream of taking Jay to Tesco without one of his bugs in his hand, and she agreed to try this in class and it really helped him, she was amazed at what a difference it made. He would sit on the carpet and fiddle with his bug and chew it but he was able to listen at the same time, in fact, having the bug in his hand made it possible for him to listen, whereas without it he couldn't concentrate because all he could think of was the fact that he was bored. Sometimes he would get a bit noisy with the toy, would fly it around and make buzzing noises, etc. The teacher encouraged the other children to accept this and they always did and if he became a bit too noisy, they'd quietly take him off to do something else. I have to say, the bug toys made it possible for him to be in the classroom, not the opposite, he really NEEDED to have something in his hand, to distract him and give him something to focus on, both at the same time. If they'd tried to make him sit there quietly with nothing else to do, it would not have been possible.

 

Maybe you could list all the reasons why having something to fiddle with would benefit R and give it to his teacher. If the teacher is open to new ideas, then she might be able to carry it off, but she'd have to have the cooperation of the other kids in the class first really, otherwise they might questions why R can have toys and they can't. I know the other kids in my lad's class were really good about it, simply because the teacher had been so open with them about it and had asked for their help about it and they were more than happy to help her, as little kids often are. Good luck, I hope you can get someone to see if from your perspective, because it could make such a very big difference to R.

 

~ Mel ~

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bikemad   

My son was given a fiddler by O/T....I didn't ask the school if he could have it I just told them he will be bringing it too school and will be using it when he needs to and he knows when.....they didn't question it.

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Sooze2   

I took a load of fidget toys in for DS after I found out he was using blu tak and said they should roate them or he wouldn't be interested after more than one session at a time, they thought it was a good idea but promptly gave them to a load of kids in his Social Group who apparently "found them really great"! Its good that they worked but - Ehem - they were not for the other kids they were for my son and since I bought them #I would rather they stayed in the class room forhim to use! I'm not sure if he uses them or not now I think about it.

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peaches   

I went to center parcs this week and bought some fiddly toys from their gift shop.

 

Number one is a small pen shaped fibre optic light - he loves that and had to buy little sis one. I got a rubik cube on a keyring and he broke that. YES it was a real rubik cube, not cheap, and he broke it. I also got him a jelly teddy on a keyring for him to squash, but he pulled the keyring off. Jelly teddy is still OK though. I also got some stretchy bendy men. I didnt find a koosh though. (I love these too). On the journey down, a piece of blutak kept him going for a while.

Edited by peaches

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skye   

I love how you read tiny little things on this site and immediately feel connected to other parents and people dealing with similar things as you. Libby keeps coming home with balls of blu tack from school. I have no idea where she gets them. I think she just gets it off of the wall where pictures have been hanging. It never even crossed my mind that she is getting it to use as a fiddle toy of sorts. The Ed Psychologist yesterday recommended a chewy type toy for my daughter because she is always licking and mouthing everything. I am going to check into it. Have any of you used one of these things? It is some sort of nylon thing. They suggested sending it with her to school in the hopes it will help her stop biting. I have no hope for that but really don't need her getting another case of threadworm with the hands constantly in the mouth situation either! Not sure if kids will make fun of it? Probably, I have noticed that kids a lot of kids are horrible most of the time at Lib's school and they wonder why she bites them! Sheesh, isn't it obvious?

p.s. we all know biting is wrong! Skye

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Holy moly, I'm with Skye on this one- my Cal adores Blu tack and mouhs it constantly, if furtively- I think the kids at his school have ridiculed this habit, but it doesn't stop him doing it.....

 

Sheesh, I feel like such a wally, this explains it!!

I wonder if his school might agree to him being allowed to carry some around? It might even assist with his recent difficulties....

Hmm......

 

Cheers, guys, I feel like a light's just went on!!

 

Esther x

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Hi Peaches!

We would really love to give you an assist on this matter. 

One tool that is being increasingly recommended by occupational therapists to include in your child’s routine is sensory toys. These toys come in many shapes and sizes including, spinners, chew toys, cubes, rings, and hand toys. Sensory items work to engage a child’s preferred sense in a way that is enjoyable and makes sense to him/her.

They may help children with autism focus, calm down in stressful situations, or relax. As a child is able to process a sense better, toys that highlight other senses or a variation of a sense may be introduced. The ultimate goal of sensory toys is to decrease a child’s fear and discomfort around his/her senses through a natural way of learning: play. This may trickle down into other skills such as improved communication due to lowered levels of anxiety or frustration. As mentioned above, consistency is key as with any intervention, and involvement from the child’s parent or caregiver can be greatly beneficial to the child’s progress.

Here's a link for a complete guide in regards on how to choose the best sensory toys, it's scientific-based effects for improvement and nourishment.

Best Sensory Toys for Kids with Sensory Processing Issues and Autism

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