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#1 julieann

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 01:12 PM

Hi all,
Has anyone been offered CBT for their child. My son is 16+ (AS + Dyslexia) he becomes very anxious if we want to travel anywhere - new place, new people etc. We want to go on holiday. First one in 8 years. Its not for another three weeks but son is already feeling sick etc. It is not travel sickness.It is anxiety - how long in car - any traffic jams- what will place be like- will he be bored - etc. Doctor has put him on Phenagen and Omeprazole and says he needs CBT but waiting lists are very long. Can anyone tell me anything about CBT.
Julieann

#2 CarerQuie

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 09:16 PM

Have sent you a pm with a useful link.xx

#3 Guest_flutter_*

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 07:21 AM

never been offered it but i think the thoery is fantastic
X

#4 lollypocket

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 12:47 PM

Hi,

I have not been offered CBT for my Son, but have had some for myself. I suffer long term bouts of depression and anxiety. I found it quite useful (although this was done through a computer programme and not a face to face with a human) in helping me to change the way I think. I would say that it is worth trying and if taken on board can be very helpful.

KW

#5 julieann

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 05:52 PM

QUOTE (julieann @ Jul 31 2006, 02:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi all,
Has anyone been offered CBT for their child. My son is 16+ (AS + Dyslexia) he becomes very anxious if we want to travel anywhere - new place, new people etc. We want to go on holiday. First one in 8 years. Its not for another three weeks but son is already feeling sick etc. It is not travel sickness.It is anxiety - how long in car - any traffic jams- what will place be like- will he be bored - etc. Doctor has put him on Phenagen and Omeprazole and says he needs CBT but waiting lists are very long. Can anyone tell me anything about CBT.
Julieann


#6 julieann

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:05 PM

Hi CarerQuie, Flutter + lollypocket,
Thanks for your replies.
Have found a book by Tony Attwood that has a programme designed to treat anxiety disorders in children with A/S, HFA and PDDNOS. " The program doesn't have to be implemented by a qualified psychologist. A teacher, speech therapist, occupational therapist or PARENT could implement the program without having training in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy". I am going to have a go.
Julieann

Edited by julieann, 03 August 2006 - 06:09 PM.


#7 Tally

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 01:08 PM

If you have to wait a very long time for a 'proper' therapist to provide CBT treatment, there's no harm in trying out a 2nd best option.

This week I heard a very interesting lecture by Jim Sinclair, a qualified counsellor from America who has autism. He was talking about accessing the best counselling when you have autism, and touched briefly on CBT, which focusses on changing your thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. He said that autistics usually have difficulties accessing and discussing their feelings, but this does not leave CBT redundant in autism. He said that if you focus on the thoughts and behaviours, the feelings will change as well, as the 3 parts are closely linked to each other.

(I heard this lecture at Autscape, which I will post about elsewhere, including more details about this particular lecture.)

The Tony Attwood book sounds like it could be really helpful. I am very interested in it for myself. Could you tell me the title please?

#8 julieann

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 07:46 PM

QUOTE (Tally @ Aug 4 2006, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you have to wait a very long time for a 'proper' therapist to provide CBT treatment, there's no harm in trying out a 2nd best option.

This week I heard a very interesting lecture by Jim Sinclair, a qualified counsellor from America who has autism. He was talking about accessing the best counselling when you have autism, and touched briefly on CBT, which focusses on changing your thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. He said that autistics usually have difficulties accessing and discussing their feelings, but this does not leave CBT redundant in autism. He said that if you focus on the thoughts and behaviours, the feelings will change as well, as the 3 parts are closely linked to each other.

(I heard this lecture at Autscape, which I will post about elsewhere, including more details about this particular lecture.)

The Tony Attwood book sounds like it could be really helpful. I am very interested in it for myself. Could you tell me the title please?


#9 julieann

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 07:55 PM

Hi Tally,
The book is called Exploring Feelings Cognitive Behaviour Therapy To Manage ANXIETY By Dr Tony Attwood. He has also written Exploring Feelings Cognitive Behaviour Therapy To Manage ANGER.

Julieann

#10 Brook

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 04:09 PM

Hi Tally,

you can find both Tony Attwood books here:

http://www.nas.org.u...opoly.jsp?d=797

Brook

#11 Flora

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 09:18 PM

My eldest son had a course of CBT with the OT earlier this year. I thought the theory was great, and it's enabled him to communicate actually what is causing his anxiety rather than just reacting without giving a reason; however, it has done nothing to alleviate his anxiety... but that fact that he's now actually verbalising his difficulties is fantastic. Prior to the therapy he'd just be distressed and anxious and no amount of talking etc could get him to explain why... other than 'I don't like school'... now he can tell me WHY he doesn't like school, crowds etc etc.

Edited by Flora, 19 August 2006 - 04:17 PM.


#12 macgumerait

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 09:49 PM

Having been on a waiting list for 10 months for a CBT assessment, I was gutted with the verdict returned that they would not be recommending me to receive this treatment.

Has anyone else went through this experience, and what happened after the refusal? Did they manage to receive another form of support?



#13 ScienceGeek

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 10:51 PM

I know a few people with ASD that have been refused CBT recently.

#14 call me jaded

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 07:57 AM

Wasn't there some research that said CBT may not be effective for people with autism?

#15 zenemu

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 09:06 PM

QUOTE (call me jaded @ Aug 12 2010, 08:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wasn't there some research that said CBT may not be effective for people with autism?


CBT is actually thought to be the best therapy for people with ASD, but generally it is a very short term device. Funding someone with ASD in the long term is probably not thought to be particularly cost effective pon the NHS, and typically the benefits of CBT for ASD's is probably poorly understood.

#16 call me jaded

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 10:11 PM

Maybe things have moved on (I'm sure they have), but the STEER published in 2004 couldn't find much in the way of rigorous research to support CBT.

Anybody got anything more current? What do NICE say?

#17 smiley1590

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 10:08 PM

on my own personal experience not saying CBT can't work with people with ASD and MH probs connected but i didn't find it very helpful productive or effective in any way shape or form when offered by CAMHS i so confused and lost in trying to turn negative into positive i became frustrated angry .... felt impossible task ... as couldn't see how i was going to achieve what expected ... so much to turn around ... task seemed never ending as i had long list of MH probs linked with A.S! i don't if treatment i having at the moment with N.A.S pyschologist is C.B.T but i suspect it is i again finding it so challenging hard going know isn't suppose to be easy fun etc but feels like dragging you under more further for some reason hurt talking over everything ... i wish could be positive thinker i really do! but everything always been blinkered in my world with personal experiences shaded as negative so hard to shift that thought process pattern etc after years of thinking in certain way got some how untrain AS mind not easy task whatsoever!

XKLX

#18 smiley1590

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 10:09 PM

C..B.T makes me clam up more become more reserved within myself i tend to withold information as get scared i feel like pushed pressured find hard to explain how i 'see' things .... i get so irratable inside

#19 JsMum

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 11:05 PM

Have the Local Authority put it in writing and the reasons why, if so and you disagree or that you are not satisfied with the outcome ie they have not recommended any other suitable treatment, then you could write in a letter of complaint, you need to contact your PCT and request the Manager of the Complaints department who will recommend that you write in your complaint.

I would also recommend you ring National Autistic Society who can go throw with you your rights to treatment via the NHS and it meeting your Autism Needs.

JsMumx


#20 Karen A

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 08:28 AM

QUOTE (call me jaded @ Aug 12 2010, 11:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Maybe things have moved on (I'm sure they have), but the STEER published in 2004 couldn't find much in the way of rigorous research to support CBT.

Anybody got anything more current? What do NICE say?


Hi.
I do not have access to current research as I am not now working in the NHS and cannot afford the cost of online subscription to relevant journals. whistle.gif whistle.gif
However I know that of the ''Talking Therapies'' CBT is considered most appropriate for individuals with ASD.
http://www.autism.or...ounselling.aspx

Tony Attwood has written ''Exploring Feelings :Anger .CBT to manage anger ''.
Our elder son was supported by a CAMHS Clinical Psychologist who used CBT.Ben has been supported by an ASD outreach teacher who uses some of the same techniques but just does not call it CBT. smile.gif

http://www.sign.ac.uk/pdf/sign98.pdf
This was the only document I could find from NICE.
It does not fully endorse CBT mainly on the basis that it might not be suitable for those with limited verbal ability or low IQ.
However neither does the document recommend OT , dietary intervention or many of the other approaches used by people here.There appears to be little solid rigorous evidence to support anything smile.gif
Karen.

Edited by Karen A, 16 August 2010 - 08:56 AM.


#21 macgumerait

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 08:29 PM

Thanks for all your replies.

I have another appointment (just an affirmation session, I suspect) next month. ive spoken to my welfare officer at work (this was hard to do - ive always tried to keep my issues internally, with no outside awareness) about the current issues, as well as what he could recommend.

He suggests I should take someone in with me to my session next month. As I have a few contacts, from social work and autism spectrum, there is scope to have someone in there with experience while Im being refused treatment.

As hinted in first thread, if CBT is not seen as a viable option, what other treatments should I consider?

<!--quoteo(post=293345:date=Aug 12 2010, 11:11 PM:name=call me jaded)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (call me jaded @ Aug 12 2010, 11:11 PM) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=293345"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Maybe things have moved on (I'm sure they have), but the <a href="http://www.wihrd.sot...rs/STEER_2004(5).pdf" target="_blank">STEER</a> published in 2004 couldn't find much in the way of rigorous research to support CBT.

Anybody got anything more current? What do NICE say?<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Hi.
I do not have access to current research as I am not now working in the NHS and cannot afford the cost of online subscription to relevant journals. <img src="http://www.asd-forum...#>/whistle.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":whistle:" border="0" alt="whistle.gif" /> <img src="style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/whistle.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":whistle:" border="0" alt="whistle.gif" />
However I know that of the ''Talking Therapies'' CBT is considered most appropriate for individuals with ASD.
<a href="http://www.autism.or...unselling.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.autism.or...elling.aspx</a>

Tony Attwood has written ''Exploring Feelings :Anger .CBT to manage anger ''.
Our elder son was supported by a CAMHS Clinical Psychologist who used CBT.Ben has been supported by an ASD outreach teacher who uses some of the same techniques but just does not call it CBT. <img src="style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

<a href="http://www.sign.ac.u...pdf/sign98.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.sign.ac.u.../sign98.pdf</a>
This was the only document I could find from NICE.
It does not fully endorse CBT mainly on the basis that it might not be suitable for those with limited verbal ability or low IQ.
However neither does the document recommend OT , dietary intervention or many of the other approaches used by people here.There appears to be little solid rigorous evidence to support anything <img src="style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />
Karen.



#22 Karen A

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 07:45 AM

Thanks for all your replies.

I have another appointment (just an affirmation session, I suspect) next month. ive spoken to my welfare officer at work (this was hard to do - ive always tried to keep my issues internally, with no outside awareness) about the current issues, as well as what he could recommend.

He suggests I should take someone in with me to my session next month. As I have a few contacts, from social work and autism spectrum, there is scope to have someone in there with experience while Im being refused treatment.

As hinted in first thread, if CBT is not seen as a viable option, what other treatments should I consider?


Hi.
I may sound sceptical but with the current financial climate decisions about what to offer often come down to funding or the availability of suitable professionals.
There are other types of counselling or psychotherapy.However as far as I am aware they are all more long term and so more expensive .They are also not generally considered as appropriate for people with ASD.If you are hoping to have counselling funded then I would be very surprised if the person making the decision would agree to any of the other talking therapies rather than CBT.

I think that rather than considering other options to suggest at the next session it might be worth being assertive and asking what can be offered if CBT is not considered appropriate.If you are told that nothing else is being offered then you could decide whether you want to make a complaint or challenge the decision.

Professionals can be very creative in the way they word things.I challenged professionals within our local CAMHS user group who talked about ''transition to adult services'' when the reality was that for many CAMHS clients the adult services do not actually exist.I felt that at least professionals should be honest and use the term ''discharge'' rather than the reality which was transition to nothing. :rolleyes: :(
Karen.

#23 macgumerait

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:21 PM

Hi.
I may sound sceptical but with the current financial climate decisions about what to offer often come down to funding or the availability of suitable professionals.
There are other types of counselling or psychotherapy.However as far as I am aware they are all more long term and so more expensive .They are also not generally considered as appropriate for people with ASD.If you are hoping to have counselling funded then I would be very surprised if the person making the decision would agree to any of the other talking therapies rather than CBT.

I think that rather than considering other options to suggest at the next session it might be worth being assertive and asking what can be offered if CBT is not considered appropriate.If you are told that nothing else is being offered then you could decide whether you want to make a complaint or challenge the decision.

Professionals can be very creative in the way they word things.I challenged professionals within our local CAMHS user group who talked about ''transition to adult services'' when the reality was that for many CAMHS clients the adult services do not actually exist.I felt that at least professionals should be honest and use the term ''discharge'' rather than the reality which was transition to nothing. :rolleyes: :(
Karen.


Transition to nothing is quite an accurate phrase for our state of services in the UK, crisis or not. Before we were skint, the government were still shutting down good projects to help people. In my case, something has to give, coz ive went years ignoring the problems I have, ever since I was first diagnosed in 2002. No action is no option, as far as Im concerned.

#24 matzoball

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:43 PM

I personally think CBT is a bit hit and miss, as in it really depends on who you get as your therapist.

I went to my first CBT session last week, and she focussed on the fact I was attacked 7 years ago as the reasons for my panic attacks and issues with losing it if my routine was disrupted or in a situation I couldn't handle.

She more or less said I didn't have AS.

Luckily I am being referred to an evening session with a different therapist as it interferes with work - second time lucky?

#25 Karen A

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 10:23 PM

Transition to nothing is quite an accurate phrase for our state of services in the UK, crisis or not. Before we were skint, the government were still shutting down good projects to help people. In my case, something has to give, coz ive went years ignoring the problems I have, ever since I was first diagnosed in 2002. No action is no option, as far as Im concerned.


Hi.
No action might be no option in your opinion.
However think it is still worth making sure that the option offered is better than nothing.
My son Ben who is 12 spent three years in weekly individual psychotherapy as did my husband and myself.
After three years one of the psychotherapists accepted that Ben has AS just before he was discharged.
School have just started a circle of friends which would have been helpful three years ago.
My husband and myself have a much stronger marriage than we would have done without the psychotherapy and I had a lot of support that was very useful.However I would not advocate that approach for others with a child with AS.

There are also plenty of accounts on the Forum from people who have found therapists who do not work well with them or who have been told that their difficulties have nothing to do with AS.So in my opinion it is worth careful consideration.After all you would not accept medication without considering the side effects just because the Dr said it was the only thing on offer.
Karen.

#26 macgumerait

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 12:35 AM

Hi.
No action might be no option in your opinion.
However think it is still worth making sure that the option offered is better than nothing.
My son Ben who is 12 spent three years in weekly individual psychotherapy as did my husband and myself.
After three years one of the psychotherapists accepted that Ben has AS just before he was discharged.
School have just started a circle of friends which would have been helpful three years ago.
My husband and myself have a much stronger marriage than we would have done without the psychotherapy and I had a lot of support that was very useful.However I would not advocate that approach for others with a child with AS.

There are also plenty of accounts on the Forum from people who have found therapists who do not work well with them or who have been told that their difficulties have nothing to do with AS.So in my opinion it is worth careful consideration.After all you would not accept medication without considering the side effects just because the Dr said it was the only thing on offer.
Karen.


Maybe I never explained myself well the first time.

The therapist said that CBT was not going to be recommended, coz too many of the problems, in her opinion, are intwined in the AS.

While she has ruled out CBT, she didnt offer any alternatives. This validates my statement of not accepting the current situation at all. I am in fulltime employment, and am finding it difficult to keep a balance with no assistance.

If CBT isnt recommended, then I will be demanding an alternative therapy is identified.

#27 Karen A

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 07:25 AM

Maybe I never explained myself well the first time.

The therapist said that CBT was not going to be recommended, coz too many of the problems, in her opinion, are intwined in the AS.

While she has ruled out CBT, she didnt offer any alternatives. This validates my statement of not accepting the current situation at all. I am in fulltime employment, and am finding it difficult to keep a balance with no assistance.

If CBT isnt recommended, then I will be demanding an alternative therapy is identified.


Sorry.I had not understood. :)
I am sure that current guidance does advocate CBT rather than other forms of therapy for people with AS where talking therapies are considered appropriate.
So I am not sure about the therapists theory that because the problems in her opinion are entwined with AS CBT should be ruled out.

It might though be worth bearing in mind that whatever style of therapy or counselling a professional uses the most important factor in terms of outcomes is the working relationship between the counsellor and the client.So it is unlikely to be helpful if at the outset you cannot agree on significant issues.
There are some counsellors and psychotherapists around who have more understanding of AS.
I could not say that with any degree of certainty until a few months ago when it turned out that two joined the Forum.
So it may be worth attempting to find a counsellor with better awareness.
There are counsellors and psychotherapist who work either privately or at low cost for charities.
I do not know whether either of these might be an option depending on your financial situation.
If you wanted to consider this option UKCP maintain a register of counsellors and psychotherapists.It is worth checking that any prospective professional is registered with them.
Another option if you feel that you are finding work difficult might be to see if any support is available either through your employer or your employer might assist with funding.

Unfortunately there is still a huge gap between the counselling provision available for individuals with common mental health needs such as anxiety and depression and the number of people who might benefit.In my area it is very difficult to obtain anything but very short term CBT.There is very limited severely stressed charity provision for those on very low incomes.There is private provision for those who are able to self fund.However for those in employment there is very little provision on the NHS.



I know that the husband of a Forum member was able to obtain funding from the PCT for counselling from an outside agency some time ago.However this happened only after lengthy negotiations with the PCT and others.
http://www.asd-forum...164#entry265164
I found the thread but it was some time ago now, :)
Karen.

Edited by Karen A, 19 August 2010 - 07:34 AM.


#28 call me jaded

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 07:47 AM

Is your employer big enough to have an Occupational Health dept? Sometimes you can access 'preventative' therapy through that especially if your job is contributing to your stress.

#29 macgumerait

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 06:49 PM

Is your employer big enough to have an Occupational Health dept? Sometimes you can access 'preventative' therapy through that especially if your job is contributing to your stress.


Yes - my employer does have an occupational health department, but Im concered about discretion. I know what gossip is like, and I dont want colleagues having something else to talk about me.

Some good advice about accessing funds for private therapy, Ill certainly check out. I had a negative experience, the last time I sought private help, as hundreds of pounds were spent and wasted.

Thanks again.

#30 call me jaded

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 10:07 AM

I wuld expect Occ Health to work in confidence and not disclose anything without your permission. We had an anonymous counselling service at one employer I worked for.

#31 trekster

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:25 PM

im currently appealing because i was refused CBT on the grounds of 'we dont treat people with Asperger syndrome'!

#32 anewman

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 12:17 AM

To be honest I doubt you can get more benefit from meeting a clinician, than you can working through this book http://www.amazon.co...99197450&sr=8-1

#33 Aeolienne

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 03:30 PM

This is the text of an email I sent in March 2008 to Emily Holmes at Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry:


I was interested to read the article 'Imagining how to tackle trauma' in the latest Oxford Today, in which you were featured. Specifically the bold claim that "CBT works", a point hammered home even more forcefully in a recent episode of 'Imagine' about self-help books, in which Alan Yentob said that CBT is known to produce positive results in just three sessions. All of which make me wonder why CBT has proved so ineffective on me. Are there different versions of the therapy? Are some versions more equal than others?

My motivation for seeking CBT was my having Asperger's syndrome. I was officially diagnosed with AS in 2001, nearly two years after finishing an MSc at Somerville and just days after taking up a full-time post at the Met Office, but did not seek CBT until late 2003. Rightly or wrongly, I thought it best to wait until after the Met Office relocation from Bracknell to Exeter. I asked the National Autistic Society to recommend a CBT specialist, but the person they put me in touch with was a complete waste of time. He didn't give me therapy so much as chit-chat with the odd bit of advice thrown in. Worse, he was often patronising or belittled my worries. For instance, I tried to talk about the apprehensions I had about getting onto the property ladder and he said "Just go round the estate agents" as if it were the easiest thing in the world! After four sessions I asked him if he was really giving me CBT and he said no, just practical advice and why did I want CBT anyway? I said I'd heard great things about it, that it had really turned people's lives around. He told me to forget it, that Asperger's lives can't be turned around.

I then resorted to the official CBT practitioners register to find one, but all the ones in Devon, bar one, turned me down because they weren't qualified to treat someone with Asperger's. The only one who was qualified initially gave me several sessions at a venue near my office over a six-month period, but then for some reason the venue became unavailable and I had to travel to his usual office in Barnstaple (some 40 miles north of Exeter) once a month. On top of that I was expected to keep a diary of noteworthy emotional experiences, which made huge inroads into my time and meant that most of the session time would be taken up by the therapist reading my notes. Eventually our meetings dwindled to once every 2-3 months, so the therapist suggested we call it quits. This was after over two years of this supposedly miraculous treatment. It was pleasant enough having someone to talk to while it lasted, but it hasn't really altered my fundamental problems of loneliness and not fitting in etc.

Did I expect too much?

#34 DameBeverage

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 12:16 AM

I have attempted CBT but it did not achieve much. I seemed to need to try and understand the emotions and all the questions, which seemed a barrier. I can only provide my own experience. I also have had other therapies that they only do for a particular time and then it is stopped due to time allocated was over.

The best therapy I have had, regarding a trauma was from a college counselor, who offered me free counseling in the summer break and also did it to my instructions. I even was allowed to tape it, so I could listen to it back, so could absorb it, by hearing it back. There definitely does need to be some ability to adapt for how someone may need to overcome something and I think we all will differ with need, depending on how we have structured our own coping stategies.

There has been a promise that we will get better services and that they will be providing toolkits as one thing to help improve things, but am unsure what this actually means as it just looks like a lot of words to me, but seems to be recognising that some adaptation is needed.

http://www.dh.gov.uk...eases/DH_125770


I am also still waiting 4 months later for my local council to get back to me about how they plan to implement the autism bill within services. Seems all very cagey at the moment.

Edited by DameBeverage, 06 April 2011 - 12:22 AM.


#35 Aeolienne

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 09:12 PM

An email I sent in 2008 to Emily Holmes at Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry:


I was interested to read the article 'Imagining how to tackle trauma' in the latest Oxford Today, in which you were featured. Specifically the bold claim that "CBT works", a point hammered home even more forcefully in a recent episode of 'Imagine' about self-help books, in which Alan Yentob said that CBT is known to produce positive results in just three sessions. All of which make me wonder why CBT has proved so ineffective on me. Are there different versions of the therapy? Are some versions more equal than others?

My motivation for seeking CBT was my having Asperger's syndrome. I was officially diagnosed with AS in 2001, nearly two years after finishing an MSc at Somerville and just days after taking up a full-time post at the Met Office, but did not seek CBT until late 2003. Rightly or wrongly, I thought it best to wait until after the Met Office relocation from Bracknell to Exeter. I asked the National Autistic Society to recommend a CBT specialist, but the person they put me in touch with was a complete waste of time. He didn't give me therapy so much as chit-chat with the odd bit of advice thrown in. Worse, he was often patronising or belittled my worries. For instance, I tried to talk about the apprehensions I had about getting onto the property ladder and he said "Just go round the estate agents" as if it were the easiest thing in the world! After four sessions I asked him if he was really giving me CBT and he said no, just practical advice and why did I want CBT anyway? I said I'd heard great things about it, that it had really turned people's lives around. He told me to forget it, that Asperger's lives can't be turned around.

I then resorted to the official CBT practitioners register to find one, but all the ones in Devon, bar one, turned me down because they weren't qualified to treat someone with Asperger's. The only one who was qualified initially gave me several sessions at a venue near my office over a six-month period, but then for some reason the venue became unavailable and I had to travel to his usual office in Barnstaple (some 40 miles north of Exeter) once a month. On top of that I was expected to keep a diary of noteworthy emotional experiences, which made huge inroads into my time and meant that most of the session time would be taken up by the therapist reading my notes. Eventually our meetings dwindled to once every 2-3 months, so the therapist suggested we call it quits. This was after over two years of this supposedly miraculous treatment. It was pleasant enough having someone to talk to while it lasted, but it hasn't really altered my fundamental problems of loneliness and not fitting in etc.

Did I expect too much?

#36 Mumble

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:48 AM

Did I expect too much?

To be honest, I'm not sure what you were expecting - though that may just be to do with missing details in your post. You state that:

My motivation for seeking CBT was my having Asperger's syndrome.

but that doesn't actually give anything to work on. It's a diagnosis. The only way really to read that would be "I have AS and I want it cured" - you haven't actually explained why you want CBT and what you hope to achieve from it.

CBT works by addressing your thought/feeling patterns and responses to situations. When I started CBT, one of the first things I did was produce a list of 'now', 'short-term', and 'long-term' issues I wanted to work on / goals I wanted to achieve. Many of these could be read in terms of difficulties related to my ASD, but the focus was on the issues.

I noticed too that you talked about keeping the diary taking up too much time. CBT does involve homework (for want of a better word) and is something you need to be prepared to commit to and work with if you want it to work. It's not a cure that someone can give you, they're supporting you to find ways of fixing things for yourself. Often I've read people saying they've had CBT (or other counselling) and it didn't work, but then also making comments like, I didn't do the task, I didn't think it would work, I was thinking about something else whilst the therapist was talking, I thought the therapist was talking nonsense/wasting my time. Well dur, why do you think it didn't work... :rolleyes:

#37 Aeolienne

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:56 AM

To be honest, I'm not sure what you were expecting - though that may just be to do with missing details in your post. You state that:

but that doesn't actually give anything to work on. It's a diagnosis. The only way really to read that would be "I have AS and I want it cured" - you haven't actually explained why you want CBT and what you hope to achieve from it.

I'd have liked to work on my difficulties in forming/maintaining friendships and relationships. Preferably not by being fobbed off with the same old same old "just join clubs and societies".

#38 dekra

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 08:47 PM

My husband went to CBT for his OCD.

There was what could be called a clash of personalities between himself and the therapist. He never went back. Having discussed it with his Psychiatrist he is back on the exceedingly long waiting list for it once more (first therapist has now left) and Dr H told him that CBT is 60% the actual CBT and 40% the person doing the therapy with you. If there are issues the patient/therapist don't gel then it can be fruitless.

Don't want to be negative on CBT but just telling his tale so that anyone getting this treatment and not getting results can look at if this may be a personal issue with the bond between patient/therapist rather than the CBT just not working.

Edited by dekra, 10 August 2011 - 08:47 PM.





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