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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team

jen

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About jen

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    warwickshire
  1. School named on Statement

    Karen, We had a very similiar problem to yours. After all you have been throught sometimes you think you have not got the energy to look at other schools than go through the process of transfering schools. Go and see what is on offer and explain your concerns. A school who are willing to offer support and take a child on with problems, means your have a school who you can communicate with and address any issues for the benefit of the child. Communication is the key to our children being happy, supported and succesful. The main questions you need to ask is: Is you child happy at the school? Are the school willing to work with you to help address any problems? This should give you the answers you are looking for. Keep strong, stay positive there are good schools out there for our children. Jen Jen
  2. How did your child learn to read?

    My child is aged 9 years with a reading age of 6.5 years. They have tried all sorts of reading schemes and none of them to seem to make a difference. Spellings are another problem. He learns his five spellings every week and get all five right. Yet two weeks later he has not retained them. We thought he may have dyslexia because he constantly has problems remembering B and D. Also reads them the wrong way round. We have found out he does have dysgraphia which explains the reasons why he finds it so difficult to write. Our son goes to a wonderful school and they have tried all sorts with no results so I decided I would complete a reading scheme with him. We started the reading scheme last month and I have been surprised at the results. My child even breaks down the words to read, something he has never done before. This reading scheme is called toe to toe. Jen
  3. Melatonin and the doctors.

    We always have to get ours from the hospital. We ring up the psych secretary and than she rings us when it is ready. Jen
  4. Fairplay For All

    We had the same situation. The eldest wanted a dog and the youngest 9years ASD was scared of dogs. We went to the dogs home and looked for an older dog. One that was not too large but likes to play with balls, toys etc. We had the dog in last September and its taken until now for our youngest to get confidence with the dog. Now he will go up and stroke the dog, he will play ball with the dog. At first the dog was kept in a separate room, away from our youngest child. When we were altogether the dog came into the room with us. Slowly over 6 months our youngest confidence has grown and it is one of the best things we have done. If you do have a dog choose one carefully. Jen
  5. Getting up in the morning

    Warm clothes help my child to relax when he wakes up. He also sits on the settee wrapped in a blanket to calm down prior to having breakfast. Regards Jen
  6. Hi Taggie, I am in exactly the same position as you. My son is doing well in a mainstream school with full time support. The local senior school of 1200 pupils was not ASD friendly. Yet another senior school with 1100 pupils were very ASD friendly. The senco was very honest and explained that the majority of teachers have some training in ASD but in reality it is very difficult for them to remember to include an ASD child. Than there are the days when teachers are off sick or on training. Although the second school we viewed were very ASD friendly I know deep down that my son will not cope with all the sensory input from such a busy environment. We have looked at a small private school (400 pupils). This school has experience of children with ASD and Aspergers. The attitude of the staff is very encouraging. We have walked round the school on an open day and met all the staff. What surprised us the most was the different members of staff actually asking how our child was effected by ASD and what happened during meltdowns and how we handled it. Since the open day we have been in to see the school in working order and were very impressed by how quiet it was. At the schools suggestion our son has also attend the school for a morning supported by his LSA. The feed back we got from our son and the LSA was very favourable. Our son will spend another day there (even though he is in year 5) to see if it is suitable for him or not. It is very early days to make a decision but we need to make the decision by June. I have decided to go by the environment. If the environment is right than my child can settle into school life and maybe achieve what he is capable of. If the environment is wrong I can predict my child will be excluded before the end of his first year. This school has got several pupils funded by the LEA because there is no where appropriate for children similiar to yours and mine within my area. The senco also has two letters on her desk regarding ASD children who has transfered up to mainstream schools yet had been excluded because the school could not manage with the childs ASD. All our children are individual so we have to go by our experience and what we can percieve of the schools we are requesting our children to go to. Taggie I wish you well with what ever decision you make.
  7. Letter of complaint to Governors

    I agree you need the statement to quantify the hours Jen
  8. Its sounds like the school feel that your child does not have the right support. What does the ED Psy say you can always ask for him to reassess your son if he has not seen him recently. If the LEA are not going to increase funding than you may have to choose a special school. Within our area children who are doing well at special school are sometimes placed back in a mainstream with the correct support. So this may help you consider the situation. From experience I can tell you the priority has to be the happiness of your child. If he is not happy move him, you could always try another mainstream school close by you. What does your ASD team advise? It sounds like the behaviour is due to your child not coping. This may be due to the teachers not having the right skills or it could be the school is not suitable for your child. Good luck in what ever you decide. Jen
  9. I am new and need direction!

    Hi Vicky, Welcome to the forum. You have to remember that the statement is his passport to a decent education. Get that right and the majority of your problems will go away. You do need professional help. Regards Jen [
  10. I have two children aged 9 and 17 years. Sometimes the gap is an advantage at other times its worse because your first child is going through the hormonal stage. You find the youngest will soon learn to fight quickly and will take hits off his older brother that are very agressive. But saying that they do love each other dearly. I think you may be surprised at how your eldest will be pleased he has a younger brother, also its good to have a brother or sister. Jen
  11. Secondary education for AS boy...

    Some LEA's will fund places in private schools or specialist private schools. The independent schools council lists all the private schools in England. You can obtain a free guide from www.isciscentral.info Jen
  12. Blood tests

    You can ask your GP for a prescription of EMLA cream. You put the EMLA cream on both arms at least 30 minutes prior to the blood test. After applying the cream put cling flim round the arms and go to the appointment. The cream can stay on longer than 30 minutes if necessary. The child will not feel any pain as the cream sedates the area. Butterflies can be used which are safer to use if the child/adult is likely to move. Good luck Jen
  13. HE'S IN !!!

    congratulations. <'> <'> <'> I hope your son enjoys his new school. What a wonderful early christmas present. Jen
  14. sensory profile

    We did a sensory profile. Our sons teacher did one and also the specialist support services. It took about 6 weeks to compare them. This was than used with the OT assessment to make a diagnosis. Jen
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