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Guest master yoda

Cranial Osteopathy.

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Guest master yoda   
Guest master yoda

Hmmmm-during a VERY informative discussion with an IPSEA bod, the subject of Cranial Osteopathy was mentioned.

A bit tricky to explain but the Osteopath's take is that in SOME cases there appears to be unnusual cranial development which can place undue pressure on the brain which with manipulation can be eased. I thought wahoo here we go, cheque books and bank loans at the ready, but from what I have actually seen it appears to be an inexpensive therapy which only requires about 6 sessions with the Osteopath. Particular cases which might be worth them looking at are those where children bang heads, never settle to sleep lying down and a few others. I'll paste a link on here for those who might like more information-there are no magic remedy claims, just some very common sense physiological observations and assistance worth exploring for some people:

http://www.cranial.org.uk/page4.html

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I actually tried this with Caghal but he would not tolerate it. Problem is he hates having his head touched, and as this is pretty much what happens during cranial osteopathy, it was a no-goer... :tearful:

It looked helluva relaxing to me, I love having a head massage!!!

Esther x

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niki   

same as esther, trickys head is a no go zone dont even go there my friend!

thanx for sharing that though.

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Is also good if you have a colicky baby or a child who has a lot ear infections or glue ear.

 

Two of my sons have had it, and it does seem to calm them down.

 

Karen

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am very interested in this, my asd son has very misshapen head and also had pyloric stenosis as a baby, and topic always appears if you do a search for this.

wonder if there's a connection there ?

wac

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oops,

realised that this topic appears if you search for pyloric stenosis and autism ! am still thinking there might be a connection especially through peptides, different subject again.

still think this is a very interesting area, but think it unlikely that my son would let anyone manipulate his bones, he is the master manipulator in this house !

 

wac.

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My son has been really awful for the last few weeks - very negative, un-co-operative, noisy, etc. He has had a difficult time at school this half-term.

 

Took him for cranial osteopathy on Friday - he really did not want to go - said it is boring, and doesn't do anything, but I made him.

 

The therapist said his system was totally locked. He was there for half an hour. Afterwards the change was amazing - he was co-operative, talking at a normal volume, holding a normal conversation, and seemed really happy. I hope the effects last!

 

Karen

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elaine1   

ooh wonder if this would help both my kids, ellie is very loud and her sleeping patterns have got worse and worse, and tom has headaches quite often.

 

he dosne like having his head messed with though, :blink: only glitch !!

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elaine1   

in connection with last post, wonder if u cd give me an idea of price ranges, is it diff in diff parts of the country. Im in west mids does anyone have experience of this there, and if so cd u let me know how much?

thanks

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In Hants (SE) it is about �30 per session, but there can be concessions if you are on benefit. You don't need to go that often after the intial sessions

eg: once a month/every six weeks, three times a year.

 

Karen

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Amanda32   

Just been reading a little on this discussion and it sounds interesting. Is this treatment similar to head massage/indian head massage etc? i will read more about it later when i have time. I am on Working Tax credit would i qualify for this?.how long do you have to wait to see someone for appointment?

Many thanks

Take carexxxxx >:D<<'>

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Fel   

We've started today on some cranial work with a clinic in Southampton with a guy who specialises in paediatric chiropractic. He said if we don't see an improvement in gait, coordination, swimming, etc., in four sessions then it's unlikely we'll see any, but seems positive at this stage that he can help. I'll let you know how we get on. My son makes a great fuss when his hair is being washed or combed as he says it hurts (he's 10), but he didn't make the slightest fuss when the guy did his head. All very subtle and gentle. Just as a by the way, he asked if my son had reached all his normal physical milestones as a baby. He was v. interested in the fact that my son didn't crawl - he completely missed out this phase and went straight from sitting to hauling himself up on things and then walking at 13 months or so. He said that the crawling stage is very important as it is a phase connected with the cerebellum and right/left side coordination. I just nodded knowingly as if I knew what the hell he was talking about ........

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Interesting comments on this subject. My son was delivered in 4 hrs, the last past part using forceps due to him becoming distressed. He is 11 now and I can plainly remember the consultant having one foot up against the delivery bed asking my wife to give it some welly whilst trying to pull the little fella out! Of course you don't question what they are doing as they are trained people (alledgedly!).

 

Due to this he had a strange shape head with a ridge which runs longitudally down to between his eyes although physically it is not noticeable. After one of his aggressive outbursts his usaully complains of a headache and cannot remember anything.

 

He did have a skull xray when he was about 18mths and we were told there was nothing unusual.......... makes me wonder now - this is something I definately will look into

 

Woodstock

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Fel   

Just thought I'd give an update. My son has now been for three sessions. It's hard to define whether it's improved any coordination, but I do really think his general mood has "lifted". He seems to be in a good mood the majority of the time and is quite cooperative about things that he previously dug his heels in and sulked with (like school work for instance). This morning he even said "this is such a happy life".

 

Obviously I can't say whether it is or is not anything to do with the cranial work, it may just be coincidence. His swimming has improved (he got his 20m badge this morning) but again, this could have happened anyway.

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I took my youngest to a paediatric cranial osteopath because he had other injuries which 4 paeds couldn't improve. Whilst there, the osteopath noted problem with cerebellar functioning (dodgey balance), difficulties crossing the midline, retained reflexes, poor concentration etc etc. She cost �40 for 1/2 hour (Berks)but we went on seeing her for about �350 worth (and it could have been more...)

 

To cut a long story short, I'd actually already realised that the little one had "sensory integration" problems and "dyspraxic" problems so I'd already had him on the waiting list for OT assessment. He was assessed proir to seeing the osteopath and offered 6 sessions of 1:1 therapy, but with a waiting list making it 6 months before he could start. So we went on and did the osteopath privately. By the time we had our 1:1 OT sessions our son had made tremendous progress and the OT couldn't believe it was the same child. He was assessed again and didn't come out as needing any therapy any all. I guess we really did have accurate "measures" of our child's performance pre- and post- osteopathic treatment and the osteopath deserves a pat on the back.

 

The down side was the cost. It got to be a strain on the resourses. Also the osteopath was less willing to work on my older son as she said that results are much more difficult to get in children once they are over 5 years of age (sorry folks).In fact we never took my older son, despite him being severely dyspraxic and AS, although I did "borrow" his brother's exercises and we did them as a family.

 

This is just one set of experiences, so don't let me put anyone off trying with a child over 5 years old. I haven't spoken to enough osteopaths to know if others claim better results with older children.

 

We eventually gave up the osteopathy due to youngest son getting Osgood Schlatter's disease on the original knee injury, which required complete rest. But he's 7 now and can "A sailor went to sea, sea, sea..." with the best of them! Overall he seems far less affected than his older brother.

 

For those of you with children who seem "clumsy", may I point you in the direction of the dyspraxia literature? The yahoo group "parentsofdyspraxickids" is a good source of links too. I have come to the autism groups via "dyspraxia" and "sensory integration dysfunction" and it worries me a little that I've met several parents now with kids dxd as AS or whatever, who in fact probably have dyspraxia and SID as well, and are not aware of the links to AS or the fact that they could/should be asking for OT assessments. If you can't get an OT assessment it is quite possible to look up books on dyspraxia at the local library as most include exercise programmes and a multitude of tips. This is what I did and I'm glad that I avoided a sense of "helplessness" by simply getting on with it in the face of extreme apathy/obstruction by our LEA. Having said that, I've found the OTs to be the "best" professionals I've had dealings with. They have never "played things down" or tried to "disempower the parent" but have always made me feel as if I am NOT going mad! Bless 'em.

 

Valiant_Skylark xx

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If anyone lives in the Bournmouth area, there is a great training college here for Osteopaths, people come from all over Europe to train here, our consultant was from Finland - which S found really interesting!

 

I took my son before he was seen by any professionals and before we knew is was on the Spectrum. He has a mis-shapen head and if you put a cycle helmet on him it sits out of line. He had cranial osteopathy and this gave some improvement to his outbursts and anger. Having seen this post I may try taking him again as he is now older. I was also told to take him after any bang to the head or fall.

 

Because the people here are training under a senior doctor they only charged �6 per session! That was a few years ago and they may have increased a little, but I thought they were wonderful people. :thumbs:

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Hi,

We tried Joe with a cranial therapist. Joe loves being touched, stroked, having his haircut etc. We thought he looked like a good candidate. He was really good ,bless him and the therapist was wonderful letting him have a ride up and down on the bed etc. However Joe would just not lie down which it seemed was virtually essential for one of the places on his head. So it became a bit of a 'no go' . Anyway rather than distress Joe it seemed sensible to wait a little time and try again. ( We weren't charged!)

The therapist was great and was really intersted in Joe and has promised to send me the latest info he has just received on the treatment of ASD through cranial therapy. I'll pass the info on of course once it arrives.

Love Joe's gran.x

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Yorkie   

We took D for his first CO appointment on Tuesday, she said she had never felt such tension (in the back of his neck/base of his skull) in a 6 year old!!! Birth trauma apparently....I know about that - I had it too!!!

 

Also, apparently the left and right side of his skull are slightly out of alignment.

 

All this can cause sleep problems/tantrums/frustrations etc etc.....

 

We're doing it weekly for 4 weeks then reviewing it, hope to have a much calmer little fella soon!! Might not ram me with a plastic cow quite so often......... :wacko:

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Merlin   

Hi My son and I both go for cranio sacral therapy (therapist also does Reiki). It doesn`t have to be hands on. My son lays on the couch with a book, fidgets and it`s no problem. We are in Surrey. If anyone wants to know more, please ask. It`s been brilliant, for me too, but my son has really benefitted. I also learned Reiki, so can use that at home....highly recommended. Hope that helps.

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KarenT   

I'm considering this for James. Can anyone recommend a cranial osteopath in the north east (Newcastle/Gateshead)? What is the cost range?

 

Karen

x

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lil_me   

Tyne & Wear Newcastle-upon-Tyne Robin Watkins 44 Harley Terrace Gosforth NE3 1UL 0191-284-3678

 

Tyne & Wear North Shields Ann Farthing The Basement 2 Northumberland Place NE30 1QP 0191-296-2159

 

Tyne & Wear North Shields Robin Watkins The Basement 2 Northumberland Place NE30 1QP 0191-296-2159

 

 

Never used any myself so far Karen but found those whilst looking for one

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KarenT   

Thanks lil me - I'd found those when researching the directory, but wondered if anyone had direct experience of using them. I like word of mouth recommendations!

 

I'm definitely considering it, but will try homeopathy first. I also have a referral to C&FP for a nurse to come out and observe James and our strategies for managing him, sort of Supernanny for autistics. Don't want to try everything at once in case it blurs the edges.

 

Thanks for the numbers.

 

Karen

x

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Hi folks i thought i should report on our experiences with Cranial Osteopathy so far. The first and most important thing i feel i should point out is that Cranial Osteopathy should NOT be confused with any other treatments such as Reiki which are not hands on because they are something quite different indeed. Osteopathy actually has to be hands on because it involves the physical manipulation of the seperate parts of the skull to alleviate birth stresses and areas causing pressure on the brain. As mentioned in another posting my son appeared to be experiencing what could only be described as discomfort when he lay down and at certain other times too from a very early age coupled with quite severe speech, language and cognitive delays. He is now 5 so we are at the higher end of the 'window of opportunity' to gain the maximum benefit from this therapy but went for broke and got him booked in. He has so far had 5 treatments each lasting around 20 minutes-I was not expecting to see a huge amount of change in my son being the eternal sceptic that i am but have got to say I have been nothing short of overwhelmed by the change in my son in such a very short space of time. He has acquired verbal and communicative skills he just did not have before and seems to be able to make much better sense of the world around him already after a very short space of time. He now increasingly makes appropriate verbal responses and can even comment on situations 'off his own bat' now which is a welcome replacement for the very challenging range of behavioural outbursts which previously constituted his main means of expression and communication especially emotional response. A fantastic example: sitting at dinner table I asked him last week to have a go at eating some of his (still quite limited in range) dinner. Fully expecting the usual array of noises, leaping off chair and general antics which constituted anything but a 'normal' verbal response, instead a quite indignant little voice pipes up '~sigh~I'm TRYING to mummy' :D:D:D That might sound quite a cheeky thing to say by any ordinary parents standards, but in our case it was nothing short of a complete breakthrough for K because there's no way he could've even found the words or expression that way as short a time ago as a couple of months.

I realise that this therapy probably won't solve all his problems and I am prepared for the fact he may still have some lifelong differences/difficulties but I cannot dispute the fact that he has gained such huge benefit from it and that it cannot be dismissed as coincidence or development that would have happpened anyway. I also understand that this particular therapy won't benefit all children displaying autistic traits but for those who do fit the 'criteria' for benefitting I would say to parents that you have very little to lose and the potential for so much to gain from giving it a try. B):clap::thumbs:

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Flora   

A few years ago I took my youngest child for cranial osteopathy to help cure his glue ear. However, we did see a vast improvement in his reading and general development. I couldn't afford to keep it up or I would have more done. However, I agree, it's certainly worth giving it a try.

 

lauren

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smiley   

Just had a read through this link, sounds facinating. My son has an acnariod cyst on the right frontal lobe, it caused petite mal fits when he was younger and i've been told there is a very definate link between AS and frontal lobe development. Im due to see his consultant soon - i'll run it by her and see what her experience of it is (i'm lucky enough to have a fab consultant :D ).

 

Thanks for the info xx

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Flora   

Smiley. You mentioned the frontal lobe and it's link to Aspergers syndrome. When my 11 yo AS son was 9 weeks old he had an MRI brain scan to find out why he was having seizures.

 

What they found was that he had an above normal amount of fluid over the frontal lobe area which wasn't enough to cause problems. However, the neurologist pointed out that there was a link to fluid on the frontal lobe and high brow academics etc (it's no cooincidence they refer to them as 'high brow'!!).

 

We had no way of knowing then that our son had Aspergers syndrome (in fact it was in 1994 when AS wasn't used so much as a diagnosis), he wasn't actually diagnosed until 2002. However, like you I've since discovered that research suggests a link between the frontal lobe and the development of Aspergers syndrome.

 

Bristol university did some recent research on adults. They have promised to get in touch with me if they decide to repeat the research on younger people. I'll keep you posted. And good luck with trying out cranial osteopathy.

 

Lauren

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I tried 2 sessions of CO with my baby when he was 8 weeks old as he was fractious and colicky ... the first time I went I thought it was a load of old cr*p .. she hardly touched him and I felt like I'd been ripped off �35 for half an hour of nothing, then I went again (my HV insisted)... and I can honestly say, it worked wonders, he was cured instantly. I would happily give my 4 year old ASD son a try with it (I didn't know older kids could have it!) .. I'll try anything for him .. I'll be phoning her tomorrow to make an appointment. If anyone in Surrey (Egham) wants her number, let me know. Stephanie x

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The frontal lobe thing interested me. When I was 36 months preggo with Asa, we had a scan and they told me that he had too much fluid in the ventrical horns in his brain ... we returned after 2 weeks of hell for a follow up scan to which some Doctor said "oh it's more than average, he's not got hydrocephalus and we think he'll be ok blah blah, the baby will be fine.... And he was (until I realised he was a bit different at 2 years of age). I wonder now if there was a link. But then I'm always wondering about the cause. Thanks for the info though.

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smiley   

Thanks Stephanie, i'd love the number :) i'm in Hampshire, but only just! On the hampshire, Berkshire, AND Surrey borders!

The frontal lobe thing has got all of M's drs nodding in agreement, from my very basic understanding, that is the part of the brain that 'puts the brakes' on your behaviour. M's very impulsive, very socially clumbsy etc etc so it seems to fit.

M was born very premature so i always assumed it was because of that, i've since found out it would have developed quite early on in the pregnancy, so it's interesting to hear that the fluid was picked up in your pregnancy Lauren. (I'd be really interested to hear what Bristol Uni have found out)

 

Mary x

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Flora   

Hi smiley, Yes me too re Bristol Uni. I'll see what I can find out and keep you posted.

 

Lauren

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If anyone lives in the Bournmouth area, there is a great training college here for Osteopaths, people come from all over Europe to train here, our consultant was from Finland - which S found really interesting!

 

I took my son before he was seen by any professionals and before we knew is was on the Spectrum. He has a mis-shapen head and if you put a cycle helmet on him it sits out of line. He had cranial osteopathy and this gave some improvement to his outbursts and anger. Having seen this post I may try taking him again as he is now older. I was also told to take him after any bang to the head or fall.

 

Because the people here are training under a senior doctor they only charged �6 per session! That was a few years ago and they may have increased a little, but I thought they were wonderful people. :thumbs:

 

i live in bournmouth

 

(*** Removed by the moderators to protect the private address of the member ***)

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trekster   

Im interested to find out if anyone here has found it to help with ear wax problems?

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