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      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   06/04/2017

      Depression, Mental Health and Crisis Support   Depression and other mental health difficulties are common amongst people on the autistic spectrum and their carers.   People who are affected by general mental health difficulties are encouraged to receive and share information, support and advice with other forum members, though it is important to point out that this exchange of information is generally based on personal experience and opinions, and is not a substitute for professional medical help.   There is a list of sources of mental health support here: <a href="http://www.asd-forum.org.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=18801" target="_blank">Mental Health Resources link</a>   People may experience a more serious crisis with their mental health and need urgent medical assistance and advice. However well intentioned, this is not an area of support that the forum can or should be attempting to offer and we would urge members who are feeling at risk of self-harm or suicide to contact either their own GP/health centre, or if out of hours contact NHS Direct on 0845 4647 or to call emergency services 999.   We want to reassure members that they have our full support in offering and seeking advice and information on general mental health issues. Members asking for information in order to help a person in their care are seeking to empower both themselves and those they represent, and we would naturally welcome any such dialogue on the forum.   However, any posts which are deemed to contain inference of personal intent to self-harm and/or suicide will be removed from the forum and that person will be contacted via the pm system with advice on where to seek appropriate help.   In addition to the post being removed, if a forum member is deemed to indicate an immediate risk to themselves, and are unable to be contacted via the pm system, the moderating team will take steps to ensure that person's safety. This may involve breaking previous confidentiality agreements and/or contacting the emergency services on that person's behalf.   Sometimes posts referring to self-harm do not indicate an immediate risk, but they may contain material which others find inappropriate or distressing. This type of post will also be removed from the public forum at the moderator's/administrator's discretion, considering the forum user base as a whole.   If any member receives a PM indicating an immediate risk and is not in a position (or does not want) to intervene, they should forward the PM to the moderating team, who will deal with the disclosure in accordance with the above guidelines.   We trust all members will appreciate the reasoning behind these guidelines, and our intention to urge any member struggling with suicidal feelings to seek and receive approproiate support from trained and experienced professional resources.   The forum guidelines have been updated to reflect the above.   Regards,   The mod/admin team
weelewy

just to say hi

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weelewy   

hi there, im new to this, so just a short message to say hi and a bit about us, i have 2 lovely boys, ryan is 1 and lewis is 3, lewis was diagnosed with asd in december so i am new to this and am looking for any suppot and as much information as i can get, Lewis has very little speech and can only understand some things you say to him, he has all the pecs equip, but doesnt seem that interested any help or advice would be very much appreciated

luv kirst :wacko:

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jb1964   

Hi Weelewy,

 

I'm pretty new to this too - can't offer any advice on PECS as my daughter was diagnosed AS at the end of last year (she's 12yrs).

 

Someone will come along soon with some great advice for you - this forum has been fantastic for me - to know you're not alone and loads of helpful friendly people with vast experience and advice.

 

Take care,

Jb

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noogsy   

hi kirsty there is tons and tons of information on this site..all very good but remember that some is relevant to england but not scotland..this is a very helpfull friendly site you can come here and ask for advice any time and people will help you...love noogsy

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lizzie   

Hi Kirst, Im pretty new here myself, I have found this forum very helpful in many ways, new members are all made to feel welcome, Im sure you will get all the advice and support you need. :D Lizzie xx

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board   

just wanted to say hello i have a daughter dx aspergers on the 12 of last month so new to all this but the nice people on here are a god send couldent be with out them all the best to you and your family jill

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Guest hallyscomet   
Guest hallyscomet

>:D<<'> >:D<<'> Welcome Kirst >:D<<'> >:D<<'>

 

You have found a great place for support :)

 

Hailey

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Jill   

Hello mate! We're in a not dissimilar position. The Boy was 4 in January and was dx last Sept.

 

We found that he paid little attention to the PECS initially, but do persevere - if he's anything like The Boy, he will get the message!

 

The only PECS that initially worked for us was the "bed" one. He knew what "Bed" meant, but didn't react when we said it. When we showed him the "bed" card for the first time, whilst saying it too, he went upstairs and climbed into bed! :o It was if he though "oh, you want me to GO to bed".

 

Since then he's gone from strength to strength & it's helping his language too - he's still pretty much non verbal but he does have a few bits of language. The thing is tho, with PECS, we're a bit less worried now about verbal communication because he's started to use PECS a little to communicate with us. That just makes it so much easier all round, because he didn't communicate at all before.

 

We've also taken photos of common things we want him to do or that he wants, these seem to work better than the PECS because he recognises our bath, his bed, his cup, cadbury chocolate rolls! We still use the PECS too though, because they work anywhere e.g. it would be no good showing him a picture of HIS bed on holiday cos he would be confused when it was a different bed!

 

Anyway, welcome to this site. It's a marvellous place for info and support.

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elun1   

Hi :D I'm pretty new to forum too. I have 2 boys like you aged 5 and 6. Youngest has autism, SLD and loads of other bits thrown in for good measure! ds2 used PECS for quite a long time. He was completely non verbal for ages but after initial resistance really took to PECS. It'd probably be a big help to you if you could go on the 2 day PECS course. A consultancy called pyramid travel all around Britain. If you check out their website details of courses are usually on there. Along with this I used a bookn called 'More than Words' which is based on a Hanen program which helps develop communication and interaction with your little one. I found this a very helpful book. National Autistic Website is also an absolute godsend packed full of information. These are all good starting points but a word of caution!! It's a long hard slog taking it all in so try and take it a bit at a time. It just completely does your head in otherwise! Take care

Elun xxx

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MumTee   

Hello and welcome >:D<<'>

 

My little 'un (nearly 3) uses PECS to exchange for food and drink and it made a huge difference to him to have the power to ask for what he wants. I had to get a digital camera and start off using pictures of things he REALLY wanted (like chocbuttons!) to get the initial exchanges going, but its been worth its weight in gold just for that - do PM if you want a bit of moral support - am no expert, but sometimes you just want to run your ideas past someone

 

>:D<<'>

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Hi Kirst and a big welcome

 

You'll find loads of helpful advice here and make loads of friends here. We'll cheer you when you're up and send you cyber hugs >:D<<'> when you're down and I think we've all had our fair share of those in our time. Welcome to this wonderful world :D

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Gilbo   
You'll find loads of helpful advice here and make loads of friends here. We'll cheer you when you're up and send you cyber hugs >:D<<'>

 

That is so very creepy.

Edited by Gilbo

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It's not creepy Gilbo it's lovely - believe you me those cyber hugs have got me through some pretty rough times - I don't know what I would have done without our friends here! :D

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melly   

Hi

 

My son is 3 1/2 and hjaving a whale of a time with pecs. It was such a break thro when he first used it to ask for something (a drink I think it was).

 

The whole system of how to introduce pecs is q long and involved, I am lucky I have the support from the trained staff at his nursery who are teaching me it step by step. The course sounds like a good I dea or there is a book (search for pecs on amazon).

 

If you want to get on with teaching him I'll tell you the first step that we did (then if you want you are welcome to pm me for more info etc, but i'm no expert!)

 

You have to start with somethiong that is particulary motivating for the child, something that they cant do them selves or some thing that you can control. If it is a toy, keep it just for this use for a while. With my boy, it was food, namely raisins. Raisins or grapes work really well as they get eaten quickly so the child has to come back and ask for more.

 

I'll explain it with the raisins, he sits on one side of the table, you facing him and an extra adult behind him.

 

On the table have a picture (real or pecs one - can send you a pecs one if you need it) of the raisins, ours is the pecs piccy which shows a little raisnin box and some raisins around it.

 

You hold a pot with 5 / 6 raisins in, saying 'mmmmm' or 'nice raisins' some thing to get their attention. Eat one maybe!

 

When the kiddy shows that they want the raisins, reaching out their hand or sim, the etra adult guides kiddies hand onto the picture. They may pick it up or may need extra adult to place it in their hand.

 

You then put out your hand and coax them to give you the picture 'want raisins', smiles reach over towards them etc.

 

Esxtra adult can guide the picture into your hand.

 

You immediately say 'raisin' and 'good boy' etc and give the child ONE raisin.

 

Picture goes back on the table in front of them and you go again.

 

 

You can use raisins, grapes, bits of biscuit (quater at a time maybe) a few crisps. Or with toys a wind up thing (as long as it doesn't last more than a few seconds), some thing that lights up or plays a tune. Or bubbles, where you only blow more when they give you the picture. Its whatever motivates your child.

 

 

The extra adult is not supposed to say n e thing whilst the are helping. The idea being that they are involved less and less as time goes by until the child can do it by themselves. We tried to do this 3 or 4 times a week, and my boy took only a few weeks before he could do this stage himself.

 

Having written it all down it sounds a bit confusing, i hope it makes sense. Its worth a try.

 

Good luck, let me know how it goes

 

Mel

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Eva   

Hi,

 

I'm new here too, I only joined up the other day. My son is 5 and has AS. This is a great forum!

 

Eva

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forbsay   

Hi

 

My wee boy is now nearly 6 ( his birthday is this weekend). He was diagnosed when he was 2.5 years old. He never showed any interested in pecs intially. Just persevere with it and you will see the rewards. It took my son a wee while - he just need to do it in his own time.

 

Take care

 

Forbsay

x

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